Data Collections


Data Collections
Sorted by Northern Ireland Census & Voter Lists
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Ireland, Tithe Applotment Books, 1805-1837606,726
Ireland, 1841/1851 Census Abstracts (Northern Ireland)24,749
Ireland 1766 Religious Census11,371
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Birth, Marriage & Death
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Ireland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1620-191111,630,002
Ireland, Civil Registration Births Index, 1864-195811,438,248
Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-19586,662,503
Ireland, Civil Registration Marriages Index, 1845-19584,568,834
Web: Global, Gravestone Photograph Index, 1265-2014Free876,327
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Data Collections
Sorted by Northern Ireland Military
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UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-185628,249
UK, De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, 1914-191926,928
UK, Electrical Engineer WWI and WWII Rolls of Honour, 1924, 1949Free378
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Immigration & Emigration
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UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-185628,249
The Wandering Irish in Europe270
Later Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725 Part Three212
Irish Passenger Lists, 1803-1806162
Irish Emigration Lists, 1833-1839125
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Data Collections
Sorted by Northern Ireland Newspapers & Periodicals
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Belfast, Northern Ireland, The Belfast Newsletter (Birth, Marriage and Death Notices), 1738-1925Free726,123
Ireland, Newspapers, 1763-18900
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Data Collections
Sorted by Northern Ireland Pictures
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Ireland, Lawrence Collection of photographs, 1870 - 191021,531
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Directories & Member Lists
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U.K., City and County Directories, 1600s-1900s404,728
UK, Civil Engineer Lists, 1818-1930194,446
UK, Electrical Engineer Lists, 1871-1930164,887
Ireland, Lord Viscount Morpeth's Testimonial Roll, 1841Free158,389
Irish Flax Growers List, 179656,018
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Court, Land, Wills & Financial
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Ireland, Tithe Applotment Books, 1805-1837606,726
Web: Northern Ireland, Will Calendar Index, 1858-1965Free404,657
Ireland, Lord Viscount Morpeth's Testimonial Roll, 1841Free158,389
Ireland, Famine Relief Commission Papers, 1844-1847FreeUpdated87,044
UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-185628,249
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Dictionaries, Encyclopedias & Reference
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Ireland, Famine Relief Commission Papers, 1844-1847FreeUpdated87,044
Irish Names and Surnames742
Heirlooms of Ireland181
Surnames in Ireland175
Irish Passenger Lists, 1803-1806162
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Maps, Atlases & Gazetteers
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There are no Maps, Atlases & Gazetteers collections unique to Northern Ireland
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Sorted by Northern Ireland Stories, Memories & Histories
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Ireland, Famine Relief Commission Papers, 1844-1847FreeUpdated87,044
Irish Pedigrees1,624
Genealogy of the Mac Claughry family480
UK, Electrical Engineer WWI and WWII Rolls of Honour, 1924, 1949Free378
Return of Owners of Land in Ireland 1876327
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A Genealogical History

Northern Ireland in brief

Government: Devolved government
Population: 1,775,000
Total area: 13,843 sq km
Capital: Belfast
Currency: Pound sterling
Common languages: English, Irish, Ulster Scots
Patron saint: St Patrick


Royal Avenue & Castle Place, Belfast

Interesting Facts

  • Northern Ireland was actually part of the Irish Free State for one day, on 6 December, 1922. As expected, it opted to ‘rejoin’ the UK the following day.
  • Ireland is the third largest island in Europe, and the twentieth largest in the world.
  • Northern Ireland is often referred to as ‘Ulster’. However, the province of Ulster actually spans both Northern and Southern Ireland, with three of its counties in the south.
  • Disruptions in the supply of cotton around the world during the American Civil War (1861-65) led to a revival in Irish linen. This led to Belfast earning the nickname ‘Linenopolis’.
  • The Irish language varies greatly across different regions of Ireland. Even the simple phrase ‘How are you?’ is worded differently in Ulster, Connacht and Munster.
  • When the Black Death hit Ireland in 1348, it hit the English and Norman inhabitants much harder than the native population, largely because they tended to live in towns and villages, rather than dispersed rural settlements.

Featured Northern Ireland Data Collections

Ireland, Famine Relief Commission Papers, 1844-184787,044
Belfast, Northern Ireland, The Belfast Newsletter (Birth, Marriage and Death Notices), 1738-1925726,123
Web: UK, Register of Railway Employee Injuries and Deaths, 1911-19153,915
Web: Northern Ireland, Will Calendar Index, 1858-1965404,657
UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-185628,249

Famous People

Resources

Northern Ireland census research

The first complete Irish census was taken in 1821. The island then adopted the British practice of recording the whole population every ten years. Sadly, one of family history’s great disappointments is that few of the records from before 1901 remain. The Irish Government itself destroyed the 1861 and 1891 returns, and almost all those for 1821 to 1851 burned in a fire that destroyed the Public Record Office in 1922. The first census after Partition was held in 1926, and it will be some time before these records are made available.

The good news is that the 1901 and 1911 returns are hugely detailed. As well as basic information such as names, ages and occupations, they tell you your ancestors’ religions, any disabilities, their ability to speak the Irish language, and much more. They’re housed in the National Archives in Dublin and the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) in Belfast. However, you can view and search them for free online.

For the missing years, you can turn to a number of ‘census substitutes’ to build a picture of your forebears’ lives. For example, when old age pensions were introduced in 1908, many people used old census information to apply. These certificates have survived, and you can see them at the National Archives, PRONI and the Family History Centres managed by the Church of Latter Day Saints.

 

Northern Ireland vital records

  • Parish registers - For any research up to the middle of the 19th century, the best resources for tracing details of your ancestors’ vital events are the registers of christenings, marriages and burials compiled by churches up and down the land. Unfortunately, these records present their own problems. An 1876 law required all Church of Ireland registers be sent to the Public Record Office in Dublin for safekeeping. Almost all registers that were sent to the PRO, about half of all those that existed, were destroyed in the 1922 fire. Of those that survive, many remain with the local clergy, but you’ll find some in the National Archives, the Representative Church Body Library in Dublin and the PRONI.

    Most rural Catholic churches didn’t begin to keep records until 1820 because of political restrictions upon the Catholic church. Most records that do exist are still with the relevant church. However, you’ll find many on microfilm at the National Library of Ireland.

  • Civil registration - In the 19th century, Ireland began recording births, marriages and deaths centrally. The civil registration of non-Catholic marriages started in 1845, and births and deaths, along with Catholic marriages, followed in 1864. If you can find your ancestors’ certificates, they provide a wealth of detail: birth records, for example, include the mother’s maiden name and the father’s occupation;

    Northern Ireland’s certificates are kept at the General Register Office (GRONI). Before you can order copies, you need to consult the indexes, to get the relevant details. You can do this at the GRONI. However, the LDS Church has created an online index for events before 1958.

 

Northern Ireland research routes

If you’re starting research in Ireland, make sure you pay these organizations a visit. Also bear in mind that many records are kept at a local level, either in record offices, libraries or within churches.