What We Are Reading: October 3rd Edition
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In many ways, family history is about finding what has been lost. The relationships, the stories, the struggles ? the people who lived it knew those things, but that knowledge got lost somewhere between them and us. What we try to do now is to rediscover what they knew. We dig into the records and evaluate what we've found, all to piece together the clues that they left for us. These articles that we read this week have all tried to do just that. "Alive Inside: The Movie and My Mother," by Annette Januzzi Wick, on These Darn Writing Shoes. Annette talks about the role of music in unlocking the memories trapped in the minds of people with dementia. "Eureka! ? Not," by Lisa Y. Henderson, on Scuffalong: Genealogy. Lisa discovered a new family member in a city directory' or did she' "Simon (1809-1904) Wilcox and Lydia Sharp/Sharpf (1810-1893) Wilcox ? In Which I Disagree With the Book of Wilcox," by Jo Henn, on Climbing My Family Tree. Sometimes we think that someone else has already made our discoveries for us. Jo took a step back and decided that in one case, they really hadn't. "When Things Work Out Just Right," by Kathryn Lake Hogan, on Looking 4 Ancestors. Kathryn shares a different kind of reunion story. "Why I Add All of My Research to My Ancestry Member Tree," by Randy Seaver, on Genea-Musings. Randy shows us that it's not just knowledge that can be lost; it can also be something tangible. What have you been reading this week' Let us know in the comments below. "Children looking at picture books at school, Santa Clara, Utah." From the Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000. "Children looking at picture books at school, Santa Clara, Utah." From the Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000.