What We Are Reading: November 14th Edition
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Cold weather and even snow (no!) has hit much of the U.S. this week. It's another reminder that the year is coming to close. With that, we are drawing ever closer to the holiday season and more opportunities for sharing our family history. Many of us (myself included) will be taking a ton of photos in the upcoming weeks. If you feel overwhelmed with all of those photos on your computer and your smartphone, Sally at Practical Archivist has some suggestions in her article, "Please Delete: De-Clutter Your Digital Photos." Holidays can mean seeing family members. While we often think of sharing family history with the older members of the family, sometimes we overlook the kids because we think they're not interested. Shannon Reese on the California Genealogical Society's blog shares her experiences with a group of kids ranging in age from 4 to 8 in her article, "Think kids don't like family history' Think again." Speaking of children, it's hard to imagine that there is anyone alive today who is a child of a Civil War veteran. Surprisingly, there are still some who are living. David A. Lande at National Geographic highlights a few of them in "Children of Civil War Veterans Still Walk Among Us, 150 Years After the War." Changing subjects completely, the Library of Congress opened its exhibition featuring the Magna Carta. Talk about some history! The exhibit will be in Washington until January 19, 2015. "Middle River, a small crossroads in the vicinity of Baltimore, Maryland. FSA (Farm Security Administration) housing project (later administered by the National Housing Agency) for Glenn L. Martin aircraft workers. At the children's library." From Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000. "Middle River, a small crossroads in the vicinity of Baltimore, Maryland. FSA (Farm Security Administration) housing project (later administered by the National Housing Agency) for Glenn L. Martin aircraft workers. At the children's library." From Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000.