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Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Robert Garcia (View posts)
Posted: 1120653751000
Classification: Query
There are two schools of thought out there as to what happened to the bodies buried at the old Campo Santo (current Milam Park) in downtown San Antonio. Some folks say the bodies are still there and others believe the bodies were removed and reinterred at San Fernando Cemetery #1. If they were removed, does anyone know the date and has anyone ever located a newspaper article about such a move? Thanks for any help.

Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Robert Garcia (View posts)
Posted: 1120942421000
Classification: Query
Got my own answer to my own question: I called Brother Ed at the San Antonio Archdiocese and he said that the Catholic portion of the Campo Santo was actually the part of the cemetery north of today's Houston Street. It was located under the most southern part of the present day Santa Rosa Hospital. The portion of the Campo Santo located south of Houston St. is the old Protestant Cemetery. Brother Ed said that as the Santa Rosa Hospital was being built (as improvements were being added) that the excavated bodies would be moved to San Fernando Cemetery #1. But that most recently, any excavated bodies are now being reinterred at San Fernando Cemetery #2.

Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Posted: 1178916645000
Classification: Query
Surnames: Curbelo, Travieso, De Arocha, Bueno de Rojas
Mr. Garcia: If I am understanding you correctly, the Catholics who were formerly buried under Santa Rosa Hospital are now located in San Fernando Cemetery #1. Do you know who I can contact to find out where a particular person is buried? I have several relatives (Curbelo, Travieso, De Arocha, Bueno de Rojas, etc.) that I would like to locate. Thank you,
Pat Curbello Anderson
JonAnderson1452@AOL.com

Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Posted: 1210428749000
Classification: Query
Surnames: Morawietz
Apologize for the length of this post but it may be of interest. Originally I posted this to the http://boards.rootsweb.com/topics.cemetery.us.tx/ message board but received no replies.

What and/or where was Campo Santo de San Fernando Cemetery, San Antonio,TX in 1857?

My ancestor Marianna Rudolf Morawietz (1810 – l Oct 1857 Bexar Co. TX), wife of Ludwig (Louis) Morawietz/ Morawiez was buried in “Campo Santo de San Fernando Cemetery, San Antonio, TX.”

Burial records show: San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, TX, p. 202, entry #1362 (LDS Microfilm #0025450). The priest wrote her name as “Maria Franciscia Morawiec” the “”uxor” or wife of “Ludovici” Morawiec. [Silesian Profiles II, p. 156, Panna Maria Historical Society]

(See notification quoted below which was posted in San Fernando Cemetery file at rootsweb.com.)

Is the Campo Santo de San Fernando Cemetery the same as San Fernando #1 referred to in the notification? Present address?

Or was Campo Santo the Catholic Cemetery located at today’s Milam Park?

Where her remains transferred? Are there any records of the transfer?

More on old Campo Santo Cemetery from list of 55 Bexar Co Historic Markers, see #25 Milam Park:

Camposanto Burials:"In 1731, with the arrival of 56 Canary Islanders, the Villa de San Fernando - now San Antonio - was established by King Phillip of Spain. The Camposanto Cemetery was located in this area and was used between 1808 and 1860."
http://www.co.bexar.tx.us/historic/Center/center.htm

NOTIFICATION POSTED ON
http://ftp.rootsweb.ancestry.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/bexar/cemet... and sanfrnd1hst.txt or:
http://ftp.rootsweb.ancestry.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/bexar/cemet...
“The City Cemetery and Catholic Cemetery were located at today’s Milam Park and Santa Rosa Hospital, respectively. In the 1850s, City Council announced that all bodies would be removed and moved to a new cemetery. In reality, based on excavation work in both Milam park and Santa Rosa
Hospital, either the bodies were not moved at all or many were left behind, as many human remains have been found, including Ben Milam. An estimated 3,000 persons were buried from 1808 to 1860.The Archdiocese of San Antonio owns and operates San Fernando #1.

The name San Fernando Cemetery was originally applied to the cemetery located within the walls of the Alamo, the area where the post office building is located. During excavation for the post office human remains were found and many believe these to be the remains of the Alamo heroes. Also buried are 37 unidentified victims of the 1921 flood, all identified as “Mexican-American”.
http://boards.rootsweb.com/topics.cemetery.us.tx/
For many years, San Fernando #1 was the exclusive burial ground for all Catholics who resided in San Antonio. However, the need for a new cemetery lead to the purchase of 91.25 acres in 1919 and the creation of San Fernando Cemetery #2. The first burial occurred at #2 in 1922.
San Fernando #1 is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places for two main reasons, the predominance of buried men who were key in the development of the country of Texas and the growth of San Antonio and the relocation in the 1850s reflecting the city’s changing needs to
accommodate growth and development.”


Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Posted: 1210440434000
Classification: Query
Thanks to Larry C. for researching this article.

Excerpt from San Antonio Express, March 17, 1935, Section D possible page 3 or 5.

This 1935 article may be a reprint. See the reference to 1927: “This cemetery is already (1927) the silent abode…” The first paragraph is missing so the author is unknown. The legible portion begins:
“1868 – Sept 17, the corner stone of the new Cathedral of San Fernando is laid with impressive ceremony on Sunday.” And continues with entries for 1872, 1873, 1874, 1877, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1898, 1902, 190?, and 1916. Then:

“The Grounds around old San Antonio served for many years, the purpose of a cemetery. Based on the records, we may ascertain that the Old Cemetery was not opened until 1808. Then, the grounds which are today the Santa Rosa Infirmary, were blessed for a new cemetery. The first person buried in this new spot in 1808, Nov. 1, was the renowned citizen Don Angel Navarro of Corsica, married to the noble Spanish lady Josefa Ruiz. Nearby this Campo Santo was the Protestant graveyard, but time pushed aside all the little mounds of earth and in their place stood macadamized Houston Street, Milam Park and later, the Market House. Fourteen years after the brave Milam fell in the Veramendi property, the Masonic Order of which he was a member, exhumed his remains and under escort of a detail of the United States Army, placed them in the center of the old City Cemetery. When the cemetery was discontinued Milam’s remains were undisturbed, and the square has since been known as Milam Park. His grave is marked by a handsome granite monument erected by the Daughters of the Republic, July 11, 1878. Milam Square, or Park, was so named at the request of Alderman Lockwood, Jan 9. 1984.

On May 18, 1855, Rt. Rev. J. M. Odin, first Bishop of Texas, bought the burial grounds known today as San Fernando No. 1. We found out that the name of the first parishioner buried in this blessed place was Ellen Clark. This is another of San Antonio’s landmarks. It is enclosed by a stone wall with its wide gate and stone arch bearing the inscription “Cemetario de San Fernando.” It lies far from the din and noise of the city, but well within the environs of “Little Mexico” with its humble “jacals” and tiny stores carrying characteristic Mexican wares.

...Many of the oldest and best known Mexicans, also members of the early German, Irish and French families, and others, descendants of the old Spanish grandees, are sleeping here. Their well kept graves and simple or gorgeous monuments, bear such names as Juan Cortez, Santa Ana Aya, Marian Oca de Cantes, Venesladita Chagoya, Castanola, Mocegemba, Giraud, Jacques, Bryan Callaghan (father of the many years’ mayor of San Antonio), Dunbar and John Twohig. Near a large statue of Christ in the center of the cemetery lies Bishop Neraz. To the left of the statue is a plot set aside for the nuns.

...The growth of San Antonio and of the San Fernando parish, says Father Camilo Torrente in his Old and New San Fernando, made necessary the purchase of a new burial ground, so His Grace the Most Rev. A. J. Drossaerts, D.D., acquired the spacious burial grounds of San Fernando Number Two.

San Fernando Number Two was dedicated March 13, 1921, and open for burials on March 2, 1921. This cemetery is already (1927) the silent abode and necropolis of 5,039 dead people, all of Spanish or Mexican descent, except one hundred of other nationalities.

...Father Torrente’s is a fitting Conclusion for Old and New San Fernando: Old San Fernando is a silent, living monument of history and romance in America. Before Washington was born, this venerable place was a center of human activity and culture, and 70 years before the liberty bell rang out in Philadelphia the rebel cry of Independence from England, the Old San Fernando bells pealed the message of Christ to the Indian Commanches as well as to the sturdy Spanish conqueror and colonist.

…The city that lives on the realities of the present and on the memories of the past is immortal.

That is why San Antonio is immortal.”

Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Posted: 1261853105000
Classification: Query
Surnames: Moravietz, Moraviec, Kindla
A kind volunteer from wwww.FindAGrave.com researched the Moravietz grave for me. She reports the office for San Fernando cemeteries is at SF#2. The staff there suggested San Jose Burial as some of the downtown graves were moved there but that conflicts with other info. See below for addresses, & FindAGrave.com for maps and name searches, etc.

A previous post stated: "...Catholic portion of the Campo Santo was actually the part of the cemetery north of today's Houston Street. It was located under the most southern part of the present day Santa Rosa Hospital. The portion of the Campo Santo located south of Houston St. is the old Protestant Cemetery...as the Santa Rosa Hospital was being built (as improvements were being added...the excavated bodies would be moved to San Fernando Cemetery #1. But that most recently, any excavated bodies are now being re-interred at San Fernando Cemetery #2."

The Cathedral of San Fernando is located on Main and Dolorosa, some distance west of the Alamo and west of the SA River. One/two blocks further west is Santa Rosa Medical, north side of Houston St., and Milam Park on the south side of Houston, just inside HY 35/10.

This is the site of the old old Campo Santo de San Fernando, predecessor of San Feranando #1 at 1100 South Colorado, based on: "The City Cemetery and Catholic Cemetery were located at today’s Milam Park and Santa Rosa Hospital, respectively. In the 1850s, City Council announced that all bodies would be removed and moved to a new cemetery."

If you have further information on this subject, please post it on the message board. Thanks.
San Jose Burial Park
8235 Mission Rd
San Antonio 78214
Phone: (210) 923-0272

San Jose Mission Cemetery
701 E Pyron Ave 78214
Phone: (210) 922-0543

http://catholiccemeteriesofsa.org/
San Fernando Cemetery I
1100 S. Colorado
San Antonio, TX 78237
Tel (210) 432-2303

San Fernando Cemetery II
746 Castroville Road
San Antonio, TX 78237
Tel (210) 432-2303

San Fernando Cemetery III
1735 Cupples Road
San Antonio, TX 78226
Tel (210) 432-2364

Re: Old Campo Santo Cemetery

Posted: 1542010421000
Classification: Query
So from what I was told by a nun at the San Fernando Cemetery #2, was that alot of the records of the graves that were moved from Campo Santos, were lost in a fire. Its sad also that alot of my ancestors are buried in San Fernando #1 and they let the headstones fall over with no care of picking them up. I hope I can get a group going to keep the headstones safe.
But their is a Book called "CampoSanto An Ancient Burial Ground of San Antonio Texas 1808 - 1860". I can send a copy of it to you through email if youd like.
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