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Preuben

Posted: 1233822692000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1268597270000
Understand now that Preuben is Prussia. My great grandfather is shown as coming from For. Preuben. Does anyone know where that might be or what it stands for.

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1233906191000
Classification: Query
Have you any original you could post or mail?

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1233940801000
Classification: Query
The German word for Prussia is Preussen, not Preuben. The symbol for a double "s" looks something like a "B". I would guess that "For. Preussen" might mean "formerly Prussia," meaning this reference was made after 1871 when the nation of Germany was formed. Prussia did not exist as a political entity any more.

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1233967638000
Classification: Query
I don't think this is exactly right. The unification of the German states in 1871 created the German Empire, not the German nation. Within this entity many of the individual states retained very considerable powers. Prussia was a kingdom (as were Bayern (Bavaria), Sachsen (Saxony) and Hannover (Hanover) and the most powerful and important state in the empire. Prussia ceased to exist by a decree of the Allied Control Commission in 1947. I have no suggestion as to what "For." in front of Preussen might mean but I doubt if it meant "formerly" for one reason that it is English and if the reference was English it would surely be "For. Prussia", and anyway Prussia most certainly still existed. If I have a brainwave about the "For." I'll come back - at the moment it is a complete blank. Best of luck anyway.

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1234111411000
Classification: Query
Could you attach a copy of the original document? It would be helpful to have more information to go on. Is the document written in German or English? When was it created?

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1234113941000
Classification: Query
I'm sure you're correct about the historic details of Germany. But I wasn't thinking along the lines of absolute historical accuracy as much as I was attempting to put myself in the mind of the person who might have been writing this document. A polyglot expression such as "formerly Preussen" could very likely issue from an U.S. census-taker who was a native German speaker. A German/Texan language grew up in South Texas and persisted until WWI. A few Texas German speakers persist even till today, and efforts are being made to record the language before it dies out.
I digress. Going back to the U.S. Census, in the 19th-century Census I commonly run across birthplace designations recorded as Sachsen, Preussen, Anhalt, etc. But with the 20th-century Census, the reference to birthplace is almost always simply, "Germany," no matter that "Germany" as a nation did not exist when the person was born. This was the common usage.
Just some thoughts I had. Without more details about the original document to go on, it is impossible to be sure of anything.

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1268587984000
Classification: Query
Being on the subject of PreuBen would anyone help in providing where I may obtain the marriage records of Henry Dieters To a Christine Stender about 1839+?

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1268588521000
Classification: Query
German vital records are (and have ever been) only held locally so unless you know where the marriage took place (and Prussia was a vast state - look at a 19th century map) you do not have much hope. In addition I believe you can only get records if you are a direct descendent, if you are, good, if not bit tough I'm afraid.

Re: Preuben

Posted: 1268629249000
Classification: Query
The information for my great grandfather came from Uk census.
If it means" formally " Preussia does that make us German descendants.
Any other ideas on how to proceed.
Thanks
Posted: 1268657576000
Classification: Query
Tell us anything you can about your great-grandfather: his name, where he lived, birth and death dates if you have them, the year of the census you mentioned.

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