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Otho Cotton

Otho Cotton

Phyllis Cotton Henley (View posts)
Posted: 963015232000
Trying to find Otho Cottons parents, he died in Indiana in approx. 1947. He farmed around Churubusco,IN. His wife was Ida Chase, they had four children; Edna, Mabel, Ruth, and Lawrence. Lawrence being my father.Dr. John Cotton was his brother or his father. Any information would greatly appreciated.

Otho Cotton

Ethel Cotton (View posts)
Posted: 966017425000
In reply to your querie, a John Cotton is in our lineage (but that isn't unusual). However, Otho sounds familiar and I will check my Papers to try to find it. Our place of beginnings was Virginia and Zionsville,IN.
You may email me if you choose.

Otho Cotton

Linda B. (View posts)
Posted: 966597898000
Ethel I'm answeriing this for my Aunt Phyllis Cotton Henley, she has pocket mail and was unable to recieve your message so I relayed it to her.You can send her an email via her pocketmail phenley@pocketmail.com she just can't receive URLs. she would like to correspond with you.

IDA CHASE

Raymalene (View posts)
Posted: 970985398000
Would your IDA, have been from NH ???
Would she be the daughter of Jonathan Chase Sarah Haynes ??
I have been looking for my IDA for some time cant seem to locate her.
Thanks, Ray
rsvp@together.net

"Dr." John Cotton is your grandfather

Posted: 972181926000
Edited: 1023192201000
Phyllis,

Greetings and it seems the "hello cousin" may be appropriate.

I have been engaged in some "in depth" research on our Cotton line
and I would like to open the world of your grandfather and your great
grandfather to you in what follows. I have much more but too much to
post on a "public message board". So please get in touch with me.

Barry A. Cotton

ps your lineage goes back (in a direct line) to both the Rev. John Cotton of Boston
and to Richard Warren, Mayflower Passenger and signer of the Mayflower Compact.

Yes, Phyllis, there is a Santa Claus!!!!!!!

Name: "Dr." John Cotton1,2, G Grandfather
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Birth Date: abt 18263
Birth Place: Jackson Township, Trumbull County, Ohio
Death Date: 24 Jan 18814,5,6 Age: 55
Death Place: Heller's Corner, Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana
Burial Date: Jan 18816
Burial Place: Buried in Eel River Cemetery- Section B; Row 14
Census Date: 18803 Age: 54
Census Place: Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana, US Census
Census Memo: John Cotton age 54 with listed profession as "physician"; Eliza A. age 41; Elmer age 4.
Occupation: farmer and "doctoring" as a physician3
Education: trained as a hospital steward during the Civil War; no record of medical school7,3
Religion: Christian
Cause of death: pneumonia or lung fever caused by acute bronchitis4
Father: Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton (1785-1861)
Mother: Elizabeth A. Williamson (1791->1866)

Spouses_____________________________________________________________________________________
1: Sarah Higley
Birth Date: 30 Sep 1834
Birth Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Death Date: 9 Dec 1853 Age: 19
Death Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Father: Robert M. Higley (1804-1890)
Mother: Lydia Mary Conant (1802-1853)
Marriage Date: 1 Jan 1848
Marriage Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Children: Robert McKown (1849-)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
2: Elizabeth J. Riddle, 1C3R
Birth Date: 18428
Birth Place: Belleville, Richland County, Ohio
Death Place: Unknown
Father: Joseph B. Riddle
Mother: Traney Knox
Marriage Date: 5 Apr 18649
Marriage Place: Kendallville, Noble County, Indiana
Children: Joseph B. (~1865-)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3: Elizabeth A. Knox10, G Grandmother
Birth Date: 25 Aug 184010,3
Birth Place: Richland County, Ohio
Death Date: 21 May 192210,6 Age: 81
Death Place: Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana
Burial Date: 24 May 192210,6
Burial Place: Buried in Eel River Cemetery- Section B; Row 14
Occupation: Housewife
Religion: Christian
Father: William Knox (1815-1881)
Mother: Isabell Beatty (1815-1854)
Marriage Date: 26 Feb 186611
Marriage Place: Trumbull County, Ohio
Children: Otho (1868-1948)
Lola B. (1872-)
Elsworth (Twin) (1874-1875)
Elmer (Twin) (1874-1937)
John B. (1876-1906)


Notes for "Dr." John Cotton:_______________________________________________________________

Will of Dr. John Cotton12
(From: Allen Country, Indiana Probate Records 1824-1899)

JOHN COTTON
February 18, 1881

In the name of the Benevolent Father of all. I, John Cotton, of the County of Allen and State of Indiana do make and publish this my last will and testament:
Item 1st: I give and bequeath to my son, John Cotton, Five-Dollars.
Item 2nd: I give and bequeath to my son, Joseph B. Cotton, Five-Dollars.
Item 3rd: I give and bequeath to my son, Robert M. Cotton, One Hundred Dollars.
Item 4th: It is my will that no sale, division or distribution be made of the residue of my estate, either real or personal after payment of all specified requests and expenses of my last sickness and funeral expenses: (except that my executor, here-in-after named, shall have the power to sell at his discretion such articles of personal property as he may deem necessary for the purpose of carrying on my farm, or for the use of my family.) but that is may be and remain undivided until my youngest child shall become twenty-one years of age, or if he shall not live until that age, then until my youngest living child shall have attained the age of twenty-one years and then I wish all my property to be divided between my wife, Eliza A. Cotton, and my four children by her (or such of them as may then be living) to share and share alike.

It is my will that the house in which I am now living shall be occupied by my wife and family until the time for the distribution of my estate as herein before directed.

I, hereby, nominate and appoint Burt S. Butt of Allen County, Indiana, my executor and it is my will that my said executor shall have full control and management of the farm on which I now live and that he shall maintain my family and educate my four children by my wife, Eliza A., out of the proceeds of my farm and hold the overplus, if any, until the final distribution of my estate, as herein before directed.

It is my will that provided my said wife, Eliza A., shall refuse to accept the provision made for here herein, but shall claim her one third of my property under the statute, then the remaining two-thirds, shall be divided equally among my seven children or such of them as may be living share and share alike.

In testimony hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 8th day of January in the year 1881.

John Cotton (signature and seal)

Signed and acknowledged by said
John Cotton, as his Last Will and
Testament in our presence; and
Signed by us in his presence.

Charles F. Sipes (signature)
John F. Criswell (signature)


Military
Served in the Civil War in Company A of the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry along with his younger brother Sylvester Cotton. John entered as a Private and was a Hospital Steward when the Civil War ended.7
___________________________________________________________________________

7Sept. 21, 1861 John Cotton volunteered and was enrolled at Anderson, Indiana as a Private in Company A of the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

Oct. 10, 1861 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry moved to Jeffersonville, Indiana

Nov. 15, 1861 the 34th moved to New Haven, Kentucky, was attached to the 10th Brigade, Army of the Ohio and remained in New Haven, Kentucky until December 14, 1861.

Dec. 14, 1861 moved to Camp Wicliffe, Kentucky and remained on duty there until February 7, 1862.

Jan Feb. 1862 John Cotton was absent from duty with Company A of the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry and detailed as a Hospital Nurse. His widow, Eliza A. Cotton, reported in her application for a pension that he was hospitalized for malaria, chronic diarrhea and disease of the lungs.

Feb. 7, 1862 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry was attached to the 10th Brigade, 4th Division of the Army of the Ohio and moved to Green River, Kentucky until Feb. 14, 1862.

Feb. 14, 1862 the 34th moved to the Ohio River.

Feb. 17-20, 1862 relocated to Cairo, Illinois with Nelson's Division of the Army of the Ohio.

Feb. 27-March 3, 1862 the 34th detached from Nelson's Division of the Army of the Ohio , moved to Commerce, Missouri and attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Mississippi until April 1862.

March 1862 John Cotton rejoined the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry as a Hospital Steward.

March 5-14, 1862 the 34th laid siege to New Madrid, Missouri.

March 15-April 8, 1862 the 34th laid siege to captured Island #10 on the Mississippi River and took Riddell's Point on March 17, 1862 .

April 7, 1862 attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the Mississippi to July 1862 and garrisoned at New Madrid, Missouri.

May 19-23, 1862 the 34th went on an expedition down the Mississippi River to Fort Pillow, Tennessee and captured Fort Pillow on June 5th.

June 14-15, 1862 the 34th moved to Memphis, Tennessee then to Duvall's Bluff on July 7th and Aberdeen on July 9th.

July 14, 1862 the 34th arrived at Helena, Arkansas and joined the District of Eastern Arkansas, Department of Missouri until November 1862.

Nov. 1862 the 34th was attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, Department of Tennessee until January 1863.

Jan. 1863 the 34th was attached to 3rd Brigade, 12th Division, 13th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee until August 1863.

April 14, 1863 the 34th was ordered to Milliken's Bend, Louisiana.

April 25-30, 1863 the 34th moved on Bruinsburg and Grand Gulf.

May 1, 1863 the 34th participated in the Battle of Port Gibson.

May 12-13, 1863 the 34th fought at Fourteen-Mile Creek.

May 16, 1863 the 34th fought at the Battle of Champion's Hill.

May 18-July 4, 1863 the 34th joined the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi and assaulted Vicksburg on May 19 and May 22nd.

July 4-10, 1863 the 34th advanced on Jackson, Mississippi and laid siege to Jackson from July 10th through July 17th.

Aug. 1863 the 34th was attached to the Department of the Gulf of Mexico until March 1864.

Aug. 4, 1863 the 34th was ordered to New Orleans, Louisiana.

Sept. 12, 1863 the 34th moved to Brashear City, Louisiana.

Oct. 3-Nov. 30, 1863 the 34th participated in the Western Louisiana Campaign and saw action at Grand Coteau on October 19th and Carrion Crow Bayou on November 3rd.

Nov. 30, 1863 the 34th was reassigned to New Iberia until December 19th during which time the Regiment re-enlisted at New Iberia on Dec. 15, 1863.

Dec. 23, 1863 to Jan. 8, 1864 the 34th moved to Pass Cavallo, Texas and were stationed there until February 21, 1864.

Feb. 21, 1864 the 34th marched to New Orleans and remained on duty there until March 20th. During this time veterans of the regiment were given furlough until May 1864.

Feb. 29, 1864 John Cotton was honorably discharged from service at Algiers, Louisiana and paid through Feb. 28, 1864.

March 1864 the 34th attached to the Defenses of New Orleans and remained on duty at the New Orleans Garrison until June 16, 1865.

December 1864 the 34th supplemented U.S. Forces in Texas and marched from Brazos to Santiago between May 11 to May 14, 1865 and saw their last action of the war at Palmetto Ranch on May 12th 13th of 1865.

May 23, 1865 the 34th camped at White's Ranch for about a month and then were ordered to move 260 miles up the Rio Grande River to Ringgold Barracks. The trip took from June 16th to June 28th and the 34th remained at Ringgold Barracks until July 24, 1865.

June 1865 the 34th was attached to the Department of Texas until February 1866.

July 24, 1865 the 34th was reassigned to Brownsville, Texas and remained there until February of 1866.

Feb. 3, 1866 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry was mustered out of service.

During the Civil War the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry lost a total of 243 men:

2 officers killed or mortally wounded
32 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded
5 officers died of disease
204 enlisted men died of disease

Of those enlisted men who suffered from disease, John Cotton was hospitalized early in the war, recovered and went on to serve faithfully as a Hospital Steward for over two and a half years.13

Research

Note by B.A. Cotton: John Cotton is referred to as "Dr." John Cotton in his burial records and in affidavits in the Civil War Widow's Pension Application submitted by his wife, Eliza A. Cotton. In addition, the 1880 Census lists John Cotton's occupation as a physician. However, I have found no evidence of his having had any formal medical training other than that he received during the Civil War as a Hospital Steward.5
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for Elizabeth A. (Spouse 3)
Obituary from the "Fort Wayne News Sentinel", Fort Wayne, Indiana, Monday, May 22, 1922, page 12, column 4:

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Cotton, 82 years old, a former resident of Fort Wayne, died at the home of her son, Elmer K. Cotton of Churubusco at 9 o'clock last night. The funeral will be held at the home of the son, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock and from the Eel river Baptist church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in the Eel River Cemetery.14
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Extracted from "Alvord's History of Noble County, Indiana" by Samuel E. Alvord, published 1902 by B.F. Bowen, Publisher:

"Eliza Ann, who married John Cotton (now deceased) and lives near Churubusco, Ind., is the mother of four children."15
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Research
Elmer and Elsworth were born twins but Elsworth died at about one year of age. As a result, the four children referred to as the children of "Eliza Ann" in John Cotton's Last Will and Testament are Otho, Lola, Elmer and John Jr. Eliza (Elizabeth) Ann Cotton was the third wife of John Cotton. Therefore, Joseph B. Cotton and Robert M. Cotton must have been the children of John Cotton's second wife, Elizabeth J. Riddle.)
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Sources
1. "General Affidavit of Marital Status," October 1888, For Civil War Widow Pension Application of Eliza A. Cotton, Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, USA, Eliza A. Cotton listing her children to include Elmer Cotton then age 15.
2. Elizabeth Cotton vs Eliza Allen et. al Complaint for Partition, August 1865, Wells County Circuit Court, T. W. Wilson, Plaintiff's Attorney.
3. "1880 Census of the United States of America," Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana, USA, June 4, 1880, 1-101/5-1, Allen County Library, July 1999.
4. "General Affidavit of Death," October 1888, For Civil War Widow Pension Application of Eliza A. Cotton, Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, USA, John Flaiswell, attending physician at the death of John Cotton on Jan. 24, 1881.
5. Undertaker Record, Jan. 26, 1881, The Estate of Doctor John Cotton: for his casket box $35; for 1 robe $6; for 1 shirt $1; for 1 pair of gloves $.25; for a yard of blue crape $.25. Died Jan. 24, 1881, aged 55 yrs.; Eel River Cemetery B-14, Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, Roberson Undertakers.
6. Cemetery Readings of Eel River and Riverview Cemeteries, 1980, Allen County, Indiana, Stuart Harter, R.R. 2, Churubusco, Indiana.
7. "War Department Record and Pension Division," Application for Civil War Service Pension, Eliza K. Cotton (widow of John Cotton), 9 9 1898, Department of Interior Bureau of Pension File 501736, Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, USA, James E. Graham, Solicitor of Government Claims, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, Department of Interior Bureau of Pensions.
8. Census Records Ohio/Indiana 1830/40/50/60
9. Marriage Records, Noble County, Indiana, Volume I 1830-1930
10. "Certificate of Death," May 22, 1922, Churubusco, Whitely County, Indiana, USA, 17372, Jesse H. Briggs, MD attending physician at death of Eliza A. Cotton, paper certificate, Indiana State Board of Health.
11. "Marriage License Marriage Record," 2 26 1866, Noble County, Indiana, USA, Book 1, Page 586, Noble County Circuit Court, Registration Book, Noble County Court House, Indiana, USA.
12. "Will of Dr. John Cotton," pages 1234-1237, Recorded on Feb. 18, 1881, Allen County Court House, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA.
13. Fredrick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of Rebellion, Copyright 1908.
14. "Funeral Notice," Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, 5 22 1922, newspaper, Allen County Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, page 12 column 14.
15. Samuel E. Alvord, Alvord's History of Noble County, Indiana, B.F. Bowen, Publisher, 1902, page 467.

_________________________________________
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2000
Created: 26 Aug 2000


Name: Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton1,2,3,4, GG Grandfather
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Birth Date: 1785
Birth Place: Plymouth Township, Massachusetts
Death Date: 1861 Age: 76
Death Place: Ossian, Wells County, Indiana
Burial Date: 18615
Burial Place: buried in Prairie View Cemetery, Jefferson Township, Wells County, Indiana
Census Date: 18604 Age: 75
Census Place: Wells County, Indiana, US Census
Census Memo: Joshua T. Cotton, age 75, and his wife, Elizabeth, age 68, are shown living with their son, Sylvester Cotton, younger brother of "Dr." John Cotton. Sylvester is age 24 and his wife, Sarah is age 25. The Civil War has yet to begin. John Sylvester join up together in 1861.
Occupation: soldier and farmer6,2
Religion: Christian
Father: Lieutenant John Cotton (1746-1831)
Mother: Lucy Tyler Little (1757-1837)

Spouses
____________________________________________________________________________________________
1: Elizabeth A. Williamson3,4, GG Grandmother
Birth Date: 1791
Birth Place: Bedford County, Pennsylvania
Death Date: aft Aug 1866 Age: 75
Death Place: Ossian, Wells County, Indiana
Father: Joseph Williamson (1756-1823)
Mother: Margaret Williamson (1771-)
Marriage Date: 16 Mar 18117
Marriage Place: Austintown, Trumbull County, Ohio
Children: William W. (1811-1852)
Victory (1818-)
Joshua L. (~1819-)
Lucy (~1822-)
John (~1826-1881)
Julia (~1830-)
Angeline (~1834-)
Sylvester (1836-1878)


Notes for Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton

"Joshua T. Cotton, who was a captain in the War of 1812, moved to Jackson township about 1818. He married Miss Williamson, and brought up a large family. From Jackson he moved to Indiana, where he died. Captain Cotton was a true specimen of the hardy pioneer as well as a good and brave soldier." 8
____________________________________________________________________________________________


Joshua Thomas Cotton moved to Indiana about 1818 and purchased 40 acres of land from the Federal Government in 1850 as follows:

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA9

To All to whom these present shall come, Greeting: Where as, Joshua T. Cotton of Wells County, Indians has deposited in the General Land office of the United States a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Fort Wayne whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the said Joshua T. Cotton according to the provisions of the Act of Congress of the 24th of April, 1820 entitled: "An act making further provisions for the sale of Public lands", for the North East quarter of the South West quarter of Section Thirteen, in Township Twenty Eight North of Eleven East in the district of lands subject to sale at Fort Wayne, Indiana containing forty acres according to the official plat of the survey of the said lands returned to the General Land Office by the Surveyor General which said Tract has been purchased by said Joshua T. Cotton, now know ye, that the United States of America, in consideration of the premise and in conformity with the several Acts of Congress in such case made and provides, have given and grants and by these present do give and grant unto the said Joshua T. Cotton and t his heirs, the said Tract above described: to have and to hold the same, together with all the rights, privileges, amenities and appurtenances of whatsoever nature hereunto belong, unto the said Joshua T. Cotton and his heirs and assigns forever.

In witness whereof, Mr. Zachary Taylor, President of the United States of America, have caused these letters to be made patent and the seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed.

Given under my hand at the City of Washington, the tenth day of April in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty and of the independence of the United States the Seventy Fourth.

By the President, Z. Taylor
recorded Vol. 5; Page 90
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Military

Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton commanded the 1st Company of the First Regiment, Third Brigade, Fourth Division during the War of 1812. What follows is an account of Ohio's involvement in the War of 1812 and the small role that Capt. Joshua T. Cotton played in this war.10

War was formally declared on June 18, 1812, and Ohio militiamen awaited orders to move. The war department plans, however, called for an initial attack by the regulars under Gen. William Hull, commandant at Detroit, who was instructed to cross the river into Canada, seize Malden and invade and hold Upper Canada. Hull followed these instructions late in July 1812 but hearing that Major General Brock with a force of British regulars was approaching and that the Indians were also preparing to make a descent on the Americans, he retreated to Detroit. Back actually arrived at Malden a few days later, and, crossing the river with a force of less than 1,500 mend, demanded the surrender of Detroit. Hull ignominiously complied with this demand on August 14, 1812.

This surrender meant something more than giving up of a mere fort. It actually turned over American supplies, placed the British in possession of the key to the Northwest, virtually surrendered all Michigan to the British, and laid the frontier wide open to the attack of the British and Indians alike. It was a stunning blow to the entire country; while throughout Ohio and the Northwest the news of the surrender appalled the people. the protection they had depended upon was swept away at one blow.

Without waiting for instructions from the war department, General Wadsworth hurriedly ordered the mobilization of the four brigades of his division, ordering them to report at Cleveland preparatory to marching to Northwest Ohio to protect the frontier. Rumors, in fact, were in circulation within a few days after Hull's surrender that the British were approaching by way of Lake Erie, and as far east as Ashtabula County even civilians mobilized to repel the invaders. The probable basis for this scare was the return to Cleveland of boats bound from Detroit and carrying paroled men whom Hull had so basely surrendered.

The regiments commanded by Colonels Rayen and Edwards were on their way to Cleveland almost immediately after the receipt of the news of Hull's surrender. Practically all Trumbull County had been mobilized, and at Cleveland it was actually necessary to send men home.

General Wadsworth began immediately to bring order out of chaos. On August 26, 1812, he wrote that many troops had already arrived and that others were coming in continually from all quarters. "I expect in a few days to have sufficient force to repel any force that the enemy can at present bring against us, " he said, "but I am destitute of everything needed for the use and support of an army. The troops are badly armed and clothed, with no provisions or camp equipage, or any means of procuring any. But the dangerous situation of the country obliges me to face every difficulty."

The commanding general acted accordingly. Within a week he had dispatched a body of men under General Perkins to Camp Avery, on the Huron River in what is now Erie County. This was to be the headquarters of the Ohio troops guarding the frontier. early in September General Perkins reached Camp Avery with 400 to 500 troops. The regiment commanded by Colonel Rayen of Youngstown reached there about September 19th.

The Ohio militiamen received their first taste of war within a few days. lack of preparation on the part of the Federal Government made it necessary that the troops care pretty much for themselves in every way, and one of their tasks was to obtain provisions. A quantity of stores had been collected at Sandusky, just north of Camp Avery, to be forwarded to General Hull at Detroit, but with Hull's capitulation the stores were held, and with the arrival of the Ohio men these were available for their use. It was in an attempt to bring these stores to camp, and also to obtain a quantity of wheat on the Ramsdale plantation (located on the peninsula north of Sandusky) that a battle took place with the Indians.

From the Huron River west the country was beset with hostile redskins so that the position of the militiamen was at all times dangerous. The news that the Indians were so close was brought to Camp Avery on September 28, 1812. Joshua R. Giddings, then a youth but a member of Captain Burnham's company in Perkin's brigade, wrote in later years:

"The news found our little band in a most enfeebled state. The bilious fever had reduced our number of effective troops until we were able to muster but two guards, consisting of two relieves; so that each man in health was actually compelled to stand on his post one-fourth part of the time.' ****

"At the time now referred to General Perkins was absent from the camp. Colonel Hayes was dangerously ill of fever, and Major Frazier was absent at Sandusky. I think Major Shannon, of Youngstown, Trumbull County, was commanding officer of the forces then at Camp Avery.

"Captain Joshua T. Cotton, then of Austintown, was our senior officer. Lieutenant Ramsay and Lieutenant Bartholomew of Vienna accompanied the party."

The "party" referred to were the volunteers who went to reinforce the men who had gone for the provisions. they started out the evening of September 28th and reached the peninsula shortly after sunrise. The engagement (actually two separate engagements) was fought with the Indians that day, September 29, 1812, at Ramsdale's plantation, resulting in the killing of six militiamen and wounding ten, but achieving a victory nevertheless. in his report to General Wadsworth of the outcome of the battle, General Perkins wrote:


"To the Commander of Cleveland:

"I arrived at camp last evening, and found that the engagement on the Peninsula was less unfortunate that was first apprehended. our loss is six killed and ten wounded. The wounded are mostly very slight, and none I think, is mortal.

"The names of the killed are, James S. Bills, Simon Blackman, Daniel Mingus, Abraham Simons, Ramsdale, Mason. (Lieutenant Ramsdell and Alexander Mason)

"Wounded are Samuel Mann, Moses Eldridge, Jacob French, Samuel W. Tanner, John Carlton, John McMahon, Elas Sperry, James Jack, a Mr. Lee, an inhabitant of this neighborhood, etc. Mr. Ramsdale also of this vicinity. Knowing the anxiety of the inhabitants at the eastward, I detain the messenger no longer than to write the above.

SIMON PERKINS

"PS - Our men fought well and the Indians suffered very considerably."
"Camp at Avery, Huron County, October 3, 1812."

Abraham Simon, referred to in the list of killed, was from Boardman Township. He was scalped before his body was recovered, this act of savagery being charged up against Omick, the Ashtabula County Indian, whose son, Devil Poc-Con, had been hanged at Cleveland three months previously for the murder of two white men. The "John McMahon" referred to was probably John McMahon, or McMahan, of Jackson Township, although his name has been confused in tradition with Joseph McMahon, slayer of Captain George, the Indian, at the salt spring in Weathersfield Township in July 1800.

On September 5 1812, the Federal Government called for 100,000 men for regular army service, and on November 28th General Wadsworth notified the war department that he had sent three regiments under General Perkins to report to General William Henry Harrison, commander of the American forces the Northwest. Having successfully complete the organization of the Fourth Division, placed it on a war footing, and turned it over to General Harrison, General Wadsworth returned home on November 28, 1812 and retired on December 20. He was at the time sixty-five years of age and a Revolutionary war veteran, but the services he rendered were invaluable despite his age.

On February 24, 1813, the year's enlistment of Ohio troops expired and the 1,500 men under General Perkins were mustered out. Their term of service had been short but their work was successful. it was the rapid and willing movement of Ohioans and Kentuckians to Northwest Ohio in the summer of 1812 that effectually checked any attempt of the British to invade the Western Reserve or Central Ohio, or to send their savage allies on such a mission. Within a few months, in fact, all danger of an enemy invasion into Ohio was definitely ended with the magnificent victory at Put-in-Bay on September 10, 1813, when Oliver Hazard Perry drove the British force from Lake Erie, and the crushing defeat that William Henry Harrison administered to the British and the Indians on the banks of the Thames River, in Upper Canada, on October 5, 1813. Harrison's victory on the Thames, Andrew Jackson's victory at New Orleans, and the splendid and daring work of American seamen on the lakes and the ocean were the outstanding features of the entire war.

It is regrettable that a complete roster of Youngstown and Trumbull County soldiers in the War of 1812 is not available, but such lists can not be obtained since the records at Columbus were destroyed and those at Washington were burned when the British sacked the national capitol building in 1814. ******

The sole available records appear to be a return of the draft from the First Regiment, Third Brigade, Fourth Division made by Colonel Rayen on September 5, 1812, as follows:

First Company Commissioned Officers
Captain Joshua T. Cotton
Lieutenant George Monteith
Ensign Jacob Erwin

Non-commissioned Officers

Sergeant John Cotton
(see below for complete list)
____________________________________________________________________________________________

ROLL OF CAPT. JOSHUA T. COTTON'S COMPANY11
(From Trumbull or Mahoning Counties, Ohio)
S

Please Pass on to Phyllis

Posted: 972182145000
Edited: 1023192201000

Phyllis,

Greetings and it seems the "hello cousin" may be appropriate.

I have been engaged in some "in depth" research on our Cotton line
and I would like to open the world of your grandfather and your great
grandfather to you in what follows. I have much more but too much to
post on a "public message board". So please get in touch with me.

Barry A. Cotton

ps your lineage goes back (in a direct line) to both the Rev. John Cotton of Boston
and to Richard Warren, Mayflower Passenger and signer of the Mayflower Compact.

Yes, Phyllis, there is a Santa Claus!!!!!!!

Name: "Dr." John Cotton1,2, G Grandfather
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Birth Date: abt 18263
Birth Place: Jackson Township, Trumbull County, Ohio
Death Date: 24 Jan 18814,5,6 Age: 55
Death Place: Heller's Corner, Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana
Burial Date: Jan 18816
Burial Place: Buried in Eel River Cemetery- Section B; Row 14
Census Date: 18803 Age: 54
Census Place: Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana, US Census
Census Memo: John Cotton age 54 with listed profession as "physician"; Eliza A. age 41; Elmer age 4.
Occupation: farmer and "doctoring" as a physician3
Education: trained as a hospital steward during the Civil War; no record of medical school7,3
Religion: Christian
Cause of death: pneumonia or lung fever caused by acute bronchitis4
Father: Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton (1785-1861)
Mother: Elizabeth A. Williamson (1791->1866)

Spouses_____________________________________________________________________________________
1: Sarah Higley
Birth Date: 30 Sep 1834
Birth Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Death Date: 9 Dec 1853 Age: 19
Death Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Father: Robert M. Higley (1804-1890)
Mother: Lydia Mary Conant (1802-1853)
Marriage Date: 1 Jan 1848
Marriage Place: Windham (Portage), Preble County, Ohio
Children: Robert McKown (1849-)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
2: Elizabeth J. Riddle, 1C3R
Birth Date: 18428
Birth Place: Belleville, Richland County, Ohio
Death Place: Unknown
Father: Joseph B. Riddle
Mother: Traney Knox
Marriage Date: 5 Apr 18649
Marriage Place: Kendallville, Noble County, Indiana
Children: Joseph B. (~1865-)
____________________________________________________________________________________________
3: Elizabeth A. Knox10, G Grandmother
Birth Date: 25 Aug 184010,3
Birth Place: Richland County, Ohio
Death Date: 21 May 192210,6 Age: 81
Death Place: Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana
Burial Date: 24 May 192210,6
Burial Place: Buried in Eel River Cemetery- Section B; Row 14
Occupation: Housewife
Religion: Christian
Father: William Knox (1815-1881)
Mother: Isabell Beatty (1815-1854)
Marriage Date: 26 Feb 186611
Marriage Place: Trumbull County, Ohio
Children: Otho (1868-1948)
Lola B. (1872-)
Elsworth (Twin) (1874-1875)
Elmer (Twin) (1874-1937)
John B. (1876-1906)


Notes for "Dr." John Cotton:_______________________________________________________________

Will of Dr. John Cotton12
(From: Allen Country, Indiana Probate Records 1824-1899)

JOHN COTTON
February 18, 1881

In the name of the Benevolent Father of all. I, John Cotton, of the County of Allen and State of Indiana do make and publish
this my last will and testament:
Item 1st: I give and bequeath to my son, John Cotton, Five-Dollars.
Item 2nd: I give and bequeath to my son, Joseph B. Cotton, Five-Dollars.
Item 3rd: I give and bequeath to my son, Robert M. Cotton, One Hundred Dollars.
Item 4th: It is my will that no sale, division or distribution be made of the residue of my estate, either real or personal after
payment of all specified requests and expenses of my last sickness and funeral expenses: (except that my executor,
here-in-after named, shall have the power to sell at his discretion such articles of personal property as he may deem necessary
for the purpose of carrying on my farm, or for the use of my family.) but that is may be and remain undivided until my
youngest child shall become twenty-one years of age, or if he shall not live until that age, then until my youngest living child
shall have attained the age of twenty-one years and then I wish all my property to be divided between my wife, Eliza A.
Cotton, and my four children by her (or such of them as may then be living) to share and share alike.

It is my will that the house in which I am now living shall be occupied by my wife and family until the time for the distribution
of my estate as herein before directed.

I, hereby, nominate and appoint Burt S. Butt of Allen County, Indiana, my executor and it is my will that my said executor shall
have full control and management of the farm on which I now live and that he shall maintain my family and educate my four
children by my wife, Eliza A., out of the proceeds of my farm and hold the overplus, if any, until the final distribution of my
estate, as herein before directed.

It is my will that provided my said wife, Eliza A., shall refuse to accept the provision made for here herein, but shall claim her
one third of my property under the statute, then the remaining two-thirds, shall be divided equally among my seven children or
such of them as may be living share and share alike.

In testimony hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 8th day of January in the year 1881.

John Cotton (signature and seal)

Signed and acknowledged by said
John Cotton, as his Last Will and
Testament in our presence; and
Signed by us in his presence.

Charles F. Sipes (signature)
John F. Criswell (signature)


Military
Served in the Civil War in Company A of the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry along with his younger brother
Sylvester Cotton. John entered as a Private and was a Hospital Steward when the Civil War ended.7
___________________________________________________________________________

7Sept. 21, 1861 John Cotton volunteered and was enrolled at Anderson, Indiana as a Private in Company A of the 34th
Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

Oct. 10, 1861 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry moved to Jeffersonville, Indiana

Nov. 15, 1861 the 34th moved to New Haven, Kentucky, was attached to the 10th Brigade, Army of the Ohio and remained in
New Haven, Kentucky until December 14, 1861.

Dec. 14, 1861 moved to Camp Wicliffe, Kentucky and remained on duty there until February 7, 1862.

Jan Feb. 1862 John Cotton was absent from duty with Company A of the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry and
detailed as a Hospital Nurse. His widow, Eliza A. Cotton, reported in her application for a pension that he was hospitalized for
malaria, chronic diarrhea and disease of the lungs.

Feb. 7, 1862 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry was attached to the 10th Brigade, 4th Division of the Army of
the Ohio and moved to Green River, Kentucky until Feb. 14, 1862.

Feb. 14, 1862 the 34th moved to the Ohio River.

Feb. 17-20, 1862 relocated to Cairo, Illinois with Nelson's Division of the Army of the Ohio.

Feb. 27-March 3, 1862 the 34th detached from Nelson's Division of the Army of the Ohio , moved to Commerce, Missouri
and attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the Mississippi until April 1862.

March 1862 John Cotton rejoined the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry as a Hospital Steward.

March 5-14, 1862 the 34th laid siege to New Madrid, Missouri.

March 15-April 8, 1862 the 34th laid siege to captured Island #10 on the Mississippi River and took Riddell's Point on March
17, 1862 .

April 7, 1862 attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the Mississippi to July 1862 and garrisoned at New Madrid,
Missouri.

May 19-23, 1862 the 34th went on an expedition down the Mississippi River to Fort Pillow, Tennessee and captured Fort
Pillow on June 5th.

June 14-15, 1862 the 34th moved to Memphis, Tennessee then to Duvall's Bluff on July 7th and Aberdeen on July 9th.

July 14, 1862 the 34th arrived at Helena, Arkansas and joined the District of Eastern Arkansas, Department of Missouri until
November 1862.

Nov. 1862 the 34th was attached to 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, Department of Tennessee until
January 1863.

Jan. 1863 the 34th was attached to 3rd Brigade, 12th Division, 13th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee until August 1863.

April 14, 1863 the 34th was ordered to Milliken's Bend, Louisiana.

April 25-30, 1863 the 34th moved on Bruinsburg and Grand Gulf.

May 1, 1863 the 34th participated in the Battle of Port Gibson.

May 12-13, 1863 the 34th fought at Fourteen-Mile Creek.

May 16, 1863 the 34th fought at the Battle of Champion's Hill.

May 18-July 4, 1863 the 34th joined the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi and assaulted Vicksburg on May 19 and May 22nd.

July 4-10, 1863 the 34th advanced on Jackson, Mississippi and laid siege to Jackson from July 10th through July 17th.

Aug. 1863 the 34th was attached to the Department of the Gulf of Mexico until March 1864.

Aug. 4, 1863 the 34th was ordered to New Orleans, Louisiana.

Sept. 12, 1863 the 34th moved to Brashear City, Louisiana.

Oct. 3-Nov. 30, 1863 the 34th participated in the Western Louisiana Campaign and saw action at Grand Coteau on October
19th and Carrion Crow Bayou on November 3rd.

Nov. 30, 1863 the 34th was reassigned to New Iberia until December 19th during which time the Regiment re-enlisted at New
Iberia on Dec. 15, 1863.

Dec. 23, 1863 to Jan. 8, 1864 the 34th moved to Pass Cavallo, Texas and were stationed there until February 21, 1864.

Feb. 21, 1864 the 34th marched to New Orleans and remained on duty there until March 20th. During this time veterans of the
regiment were given furlough until May 1864.

Feb. 29, 1864 John Cotton was honorably discharged from service at Algiers, Louisiana and paid through Feb. 28, 1864.

March 1864 the 34th attached to the Defenses of New Orleans and remained on duty at the New Orleans Garrison until June
16, 1865.

December 1864 the 34th supplemented U.S. Forces in Texas and marched from Brazos to Santiago between May 11 to May
14, 1865 and saw their last action of the war at Palmetto Ranch on May 12th 13th of 1865.

May 23, 1865 the 34th camped at White's Ranch for about a month and then were ordered to move 260 miles up the Rio
Grande River to Ringgold Barracks. The trip took from June 16th to June 28th and the 34th remained at Ringgold Barracks
until July 24, 1865.

June 1865 the 34th was attached to the Department of Texas until February 1866.

July 24, 1865 the 34th was reassigned to Brownsville, Texas and remained there until February of 1866.

Feb. 3, 1866 the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry was mustered out of service.

During the Civil War the 34th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry lost a total of 243 men:

2 officers killed or mortally wounded
32 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded
5 officers died of disease
204 enlisted men died of disease

Of those enlisted men who suffered from disease, John Cotton was hospitalized early in the war, recovered and went on to
serve faithfully as a Hospital Steward for over two and a half years.13

Research

Note by B.A. Cotton: John Cotton is referred to as "Dr." John Cotton in his burial records and in affidavits in the Civil War
Widow's Pension Application submitted by his wife, Eliza A. Cotton. In addition, the 1880 Census lists John Cotton's
occupation as a physician. However, I have found no evidence of his having had any formal medical training other than that he
received during the Civil War as a Hospital Steward.5
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Notes for Elizabeth A. (Spouse 3)
Obituary from the "Fort Wayne News Sentinel", Fort Wayne, Indiana, Monday, May 22, 1922, page 12, column 4:

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Cotton, 82 years old, a former resident of Fort Wayne, died at the home of her son, Elmer K. Cotton of
Churubusco at 9 o'clock last night. The funeral will be held at the home of the son, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock and
from the Eel river Baptist church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in the Eel River Cemetery.14
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Extracted from "Alvord's History of Noble County, Indiana" by Samuel E. Alvord, published 1902 by B.F. Bowen, Publisher:

"Eliza Ann, who married John Cotton (now deceased) and lives near Churubusco, Ind., is the mother of four children."15
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Research
Elmer and Elsworth were born twins but Elsworth died at about one year of age. As a result, the four children referred to as
the children of "Eliza Ann" in John Cotton's Last Will and Testament are Otho, Lola, Elmer and John Jr. Eliza (Elizabeth) Ann
Cotton was the third wife of John Cotton. Therefore, Joseph B. Cotton and Robert M. Cotton must have been the children of
John Cotton's second wife, Elizabeth J. Riddle.)
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Sources
1. "General Affidavit of Marital Status," October 1888, For Civil War Widow Pension Application of Eliza A. Cotton,
Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, USA, Eliza A. Cotton listing her children to include Elmer Cotton then age 15.
2. Elizabeth Cotton vs Eliza Allen et. al Complaint for Partition, August 1865, Wells County Circuit Court, T. W. Wilson,
Plaintiff's Attorney.
3. "1880 Census of the United States of America," Eel River Township, Allen County, Indiana, USA, June 4, 1880, 1-101/5-1,
Allen County Library, July 1999.
4. "General Affidavit of Death," October 1888, For Civil War Widow Pension Application of Eliza A. Cotton, Churubusco,
Whitley County, Indiana, USA, John Flaiswell, attending physician at the death of John Cotton on Jan. 24, 1881.
5. Undertaker Record, Jan. 26, 1881, The Estate of Doctor John Cotton: for his casket box $35; for 1 robe $6; for 1 shirt
$1; for 1 pair of gloves $.25; for a yard of blue crape $.25. Died Jan. 24, 1881, aged 55 yrs.; Eel River Cemetery B-14,
Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, Roberson Undertakers.
6. Cemetery Readings of Eel River and Riverview Cemeteries, 1980, Allen County, Indiana, Stuart Harter, R.R. 2,
Churubusco, Indiana.
7. "War Department Record and Pension Division," Application for Civil War Service Pension, Eliza K. Cotton (widow of
John Cotton), 9 9 1898, Department of Interior Bureau of Pension File 501736, Churubusco, Whitley County, Indiana, USA,
James E. Graham, Solicitor of Government Claims, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, Department of Interior Bureau of Pensions.
8. Census Records Ohio/Indiana 1830/40/50/60
9. Marriage Records, Noble County, Indiana, Volume I 1830-1930
10. "Certificate of Death," May 22, 1922, Churubusco, Whitely County, Indiana, USA, 17372, Jesse H. Briggs, MD attending
physician at death of Eliza A. Cotton, paper certificate, Indiana State Board of Health.
11. "Marriage License Marriage Record," 2 26 1866, Noble County, Indiana, USA, Book 1, Page 586, Noble County Circuit
Court, Registration Book, Noble County Court House, Indiana, USA.
12. "Will of Dr. John Cotton," pages 1234-1237, Recorded on Feb. 18, 1881, Allen County Court House, Fort Wayne, Indiana,
USA.
13. Fredrick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of Rebellion, Copyright 1908.
14. "Funeral Notice," Fort Wayne News Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, 5 22 1922, newspaper, Allen County Library,
Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA, page 12 column 14.
15. Samuel E. Alvord, Alvord's History of Noble County, Indiana, B.F. Bowen, Publisher, 1902, page 467.

_________________________________________
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2000
Created: 26 Aug 2000


Name: Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton1,2,3,4, GG Grandfather
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Birth Date: 1785
Birth Place: Plymouth Township, Massachusetts
Death Date: 1861 Age: 76
Death Place: Ossian, Wells County, Indiana
Burial Date: 18615
Burial Place: buried in Prairie View Cemetery, Jefferson Township, Wells County, Indiana
Census Date: 18604 Age: 75
Census Place: Wells County, Indiana, US Census
Census Memo: Joshua T. Cotton, age 75, and his wife, Elizabeth, age 68, are shown living with their son, Sylvester Cotton,
younger brother of "Dr." John Cotton. Sylvester is age 24 and his wife, Sarah is age 25. The Civil War has yet to begin. John
Sylvester join up together in 1861.
Occupation: soldier and farmer6,2
Religion: Christian
Father: Lieutenant John Cotton (1746-1831)
Mother: Lucy Tyler Little (1757-1837)

Spouses
____________________________________________________________________________________________
1: Elizabeth A. Williamson3,4, GG Grandmother
Birth Date: 1791
Birth Place: Bedford County, Pennsylvania
Death Date: aft Aug 1866 Age: 75
Death Place: Ossian, Wells County, Indiana
Father: Joseph Williamson (1756-1823)
Mother: Margaret Williamson (1771-)
Marriage Date: 16 Mar 18117
Marriage Place: Austintown, Trumbull County, Ohio
Children: William W. (1811-1852)
Victory (1818-)
Joshua L. (~1819-)
Lucy (~1822-)
John (~1826-1881)
Julia (~1830-)
Angeline (~1834-)
Sylvester (1836-1878)


Notes for Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton

"Joshua T. Cotton, who was a captain in the War of 1812, moved to Jackson township about 1818. He married Miss
Williamson, and brought up a large family. From Jackson he moved to Indiana, where he died. Captain Cotton was a true
specimen of the hardy pioneer as well as a good and brave soldier." 8
____________________________________________________________________________________________


Joshua Thomas Cotton moved to Indiana about 1818 and purchased 40 acres of land from the Federal Government in 1850 as
follows:

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA9

To All to whom these present shall come, Greeting: Where as, Joshua T. Cotton of Wells County, Indians has deposited in the
General Land office of the United States a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Fort Wayne whereby it appears
that full payment has been made by the said Joshua T. Cotton according to the provisions of the Act of Congress of the 24th
of April, 1820 entitled: "An act making further provisions for the sale of Public lands", for the North East quarter of the South
West quarter of Section Thirteen, in Township Twenty Eight North of Eleven East in the district of lands subject to sale at
Fort Wayne, Indiana containing forty acres according to the official plat of the survey of the said lands returned to the General
Land Office by the Surveyor General which said Tract has been purchased by said Joshua T. Cotton, now know ye, that the
United States of America, in consideration of the premise and in conformity with the several Acts of Congress in such case
made and provides, have given and grants and by these present do give and grant unto the said Joshua T. Cotton and t his
heirs, the said Tract above described: to have and to hold the same, together with all the rights, privileges, amenities and
appurtenances of whatsoever nature hereunto belong, unto the said Joshua T. Cotton and his heirs and assigns forever.

In witness whereof, Mr. Zachary Taylor, President of the United States of America, have caused these letters to be made
patent and the seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed.

Given under my hand at the City of Washington, the tenth day of April in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred
and Fifty and of the independence of the United States the Seventy Fourth.

By the President, Z. Taylor
recorded Vol. 5; Page 90
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Military

Captain Joshua Thomas Cotton commanded the 1st Company of the First Regiment, Third Brigade, Fourth Division during the
War of 1812. What follows is an account of Ohio's involvement in the War of 1812 and the small role that Capt. Joshua T.
Cotton played in this war.10

War was formally declared on June 18, 1812, and Ohio militiamen awaited orders to move. The war department plans,
however, called for an initial attack by the regulars under Gen. William Hull, commandant at Detroit, who was instructed to
cross the river into Canada, seize Malden and invade and hold Upper Canada. Hull followed these instructions late in July
1812 but hearing that Major General Brock with a force of British regulars was approaching and that the Indians were also
preparing to make a descent on the Americans, he retreated to Detroit. Back actually arrived at Malden a few days later, and,
crossing the river with a force of less than 1,500 mend, demanded the surrender of Detroit. Hull ignominiously complied with
this demand on August 14, 1812.

This surrender meant something more than giving up of a mere fort. It actually turned over American supplies, placed the
British in possession of the key to the Northwest, virtually surrendered all Michigan to the British, and laid the frontier wide
open to the attack of the British and Indians alike. It was a stunning blow to the entire country; while throughout Ohio and the
Northwest the news of the surrender appalled the people. the protection they had depended upon was swept away at one
blow.

Without waiting for instructions from the war department, General Wadsworth hurriedly ordered the mobilization of the four
brigades of his division, ordering them to report at Cleveland preparatory to marching to Northwest Ohio to protect the
frontier. Rumors, in fact, were in circulation within a few days after Hull's surrender that the British were approaching by way
of Lake Erie, and as far east as Ashtabula

John Cotten

Posted: 972234528000
Edited: 1027039463000
Do you have any information about John Cotten who was born in Northampton County, N.C..I don't have his birth date, but he married Elizabeth Andrews in 1795. They both moved to Hinds Co., Mississippi. This is my gggg(I don't really know how many g's it is)grandfather.

North Carolina "Cottens"

Posted: 972252167000
Edited: 1023192201000
Linda,

The following website could help you out:

http://www.southern-style.com/cotton.htm

The presentation is a bit confusing because line seems to want to
connect with just about every "Royal" in history... however, it seem
that the "John Cotten" you seek is from this line... if you can only get
through all the "extras"...

The website shows an "Abner Cotton" born in Northhampton County, NC in 1738
and this line of Cotten/Cotten seems to use either spelling.

There are also several good referals to other websites like:

"Jean Cotton's wonder Web Site and Jean Cotton's recommendation of:
http://www.tiac.net/users/pmcbride

The site belongs to Paul McBride and I have come across his site on many
web-searches for info on "Cottons".

Unfortunately, the enthusiasm of many "Web-genealogists" does not make up
for a sever lack of disciplined research methodology. As the saying goes,
"The path to hell is paved with good intentions." and many a well intentioned web-user
posts or passes on misleading information.

I only use the web for "clues" and work with a professional Certified Genealogical Researcher, for
all research into the line of Cottons that I descend from. Free genealogy off the web is a lot like
free sex... eventually you pay... one way or anothrer. So my advise is check out the differednt genealogy links
and find the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Site or your state Genealogical Site or
a the North Carolina State Genealogy Society or Historic Society to ask for a recommendation of a good
professional genealogist. The fees are usually reasonable and they have access to "proven" material that
will be of benefit to you.

Each generation in a line is best proven with birth, death and/or marriage certificates.
When these are not available for ancestors born in the 1800s and before, some other family member may
have already "proven" your line and you are unaware of it. For access to this information, I highly
recommend State and Local Genealogical Societies and the services of Professiona Certified Genealogical
Researchers.

Hope this helps.

Barry A. Cotton

Barry A. Cotton

Otho Cotton (View posts)
Posted: 972295543000
Thank you for your information. A niece, Linda, called me and forwarded it to a friend here in MT for me. I live off the grid and do not have access to Internet. My pocketmail does not accept attachment, or over 4,000 characters. My first cousins live in Churubusco. I am so excited that you responded. Please e-mail me at :
phenley@pocketmail.com and we can continue this.
LUV CUZ

Cotton Package will come via Snail Mail

Posted: 972296934000
Edited: 1023192201000
Please send your "snail mail" address to me at so we can get "off line".

I am working with a Certified Genealogical Researcher in Fort Wayne, Indiana. My father grew up in Churubusco and went to Purdue Universtiy. So I have "proven" our branch of the Cotton Family back to Rev. John Cotton of Boston... there are a lot of colorful "characters" you need to meet. A distant cousin married Ralph Waldo Emerson. We had three "distinguished Patriots" in the Revolutionary: Capt. Nathaniel Little and Colonel Theophilus Cotton and his son, Lt. John Cotton. Lt. John married Cpt. Little's daughter Lucy Little and connected us back to Richard Warren Mayflower passenger and signer of the Mayflower Compact. The same Little line started one of the first Newpapers in America and this enterprise eventually evolved into the publishing firm, Little Brown. Colonel Theophilus was a real character... one of the Sons of Liberty who hatched a plot to relocate Plymouth Rock from sea shore to a safer location in the Plymouth town square. (Fear was the Brits would destroy it or something). Using 30 teams of oxen and a huge "screw" to lift the rock... the boys nearly made it but ended up breaking Plymouth Rock into two... one piece fell back into the sand and the other was removed to the Plymouth town square where the Sons of Liberty had planted their "Give Me Liberty of Give Me Death" flag. Mr. Winslow (a wig) called the boys "Sons of Licentiouness"...

So send me your address and I will send you what I have so far...

How many Cottons are you in contact with?

It would be nice to get a network going... I am sure most (like myself) have been unaware of our heritage.
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