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Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1105563439000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1115000557000
Does anyone have any basic information/history of the Knox County Home, aka the County Almshouse at Bangs Ohio? I am looking for an address, does it still exist and, if not, when it was "decommissioned"?

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Burdetta Cunningham (View posts)
Posted: 1110141950000
Classification: Query
Could you be referring to the Knox County Infrimary? AKA the Old Folks Home, Poor House, etc. (I never heard of Almshouse) This building still stands. The cemetery that was used for the people that died there is still there but the markers are gone. When they closed the Infrimary (in the 50's I think), the Four Square Gospel Church bought the property and operated a Bible College there until 1988. It is now part of a Golf Course. It is only used at Halloween time as a ghost house. I have recent pictures of this building if it is the one for which you are searching.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Burdetta Cunningham (View posts)
Posted: 1110143535000
Classification: Query
Just found some more info. The Knox County Infrimary (Knox County Home) in Bangs was established in 1877. In 1957 it was purchased by the Four-Square Gospel Church and was opened as a Bible College in 1958.

In the 1912 "Past and Present of Knox County Ohio" Volume 1 on Page 80, the section on The Knox County Infrimary in part reads: "from an early date (Knox County) had charity and compassion on it unfortunate poor. In 1842, the county commissioners bought 132 acres in southwest corner of Liberty township as its first poor farm. In 1874, it became necessary to provide better quarters for the poor of the county due to an increase in the numbers of poor. After several difficulties, the new building was completed in 1877. This instiitution is located on section 2, Liberty township, on a beautiful elevation of ground on the south side of Dry Creek, near Bangs Station along the line of the Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Columbus railway. The original main building is 75 by 127 feet, with an open court in the rear 34 by 55 feet. It is four stories high with a tower rising 65 feet above the roof. Over one million bricks were used in the construction. It has three water tanks on the upper floor holding 40 barrels of water each. The building was heated by steam throughout. There were 100 good rooms, accommodating easily 125 inmates. The tax-payers of Knox county have ever cared for her soldiers and other unfortunate citizens."

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1110158387000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1115000557000
Thanks Burdetta. I am sure this is the place. I believe it was described in the 1920 US Census as the County Almshouse, Bangs, Ohio. I was researching someone who died there in 1941. I am still awaiting a death certificate, but if it turns out she was buried there I guess the grave will be unmarked (and under the 9th tee.) Thanks again.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Burdetta Cunningham (View posts)
Posted: 1110166927000
Classification: Query
Rick,
The cemetery has a nice board fence around it and the owners show respect by keeping it mowed and clean. The problem is most of the graves and maybe all of them were wooden crosses. Some of them hang on the fence. But I don't think there are any markers of any kind on the graves themselves. There might be some burial records with grave numbers or locations. The commissioners were responsible for the burials. So there should be some records somewhere.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1123708124000
Classification: Query
Surnames: Geroge, Jacobs, Bell, Barker
Is there a chance this place had or has somewhere a list of residents circa 1920 - 1930? Can I find a list on the internet?
Thanks,
Judy

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1126981302000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1129215905000
There is a listing in knox county cemetery book vol 1 for this cemetery. 68 names and a note stating there were also 109 Markers there with no first or last name.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1334435866000
Classification: Query
It was Mount Vernon Bible College. I was there from 1972 to 1978. It was a wonderful place.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1334435869000
Classification: Query
It was Mount Vernon Bible College. I was there from 1972 to 1978. It was a wonderful place.

Re: Knox County Home (Almshouse)

Posted: 1482771852000
Classification: Query
In the interest of keeping this thread alive...this magnificent building was destroyed by fire in 2015. I have not seen anything in the news at this time that indicates whether the investigation is complete or cause known. The last thing I read was that the owner had not responded to the Mount Vernon News with comments, though I may have missed it if he did. The building was on the National Register of Historic Places, and there were many people who hoped to see it conserved. As I understand it, getting funds and support to do this with such a large building in need of a lot of repair was a challenge and was still sure to be a long process at the time of the building's demise. The graves in the cemetery are marked with small metal plates with the information engraved on them. They are flat to the ground, and mowing keep the site tidy without damaging the markers. Visitors can park on the roadside and walk into the site to view markers. A few years ago, I asked one of that township's trustees if they had any information about the relationship between the graves and the infirmary, and he confirmed that the burials were mostly of persons who died at that facility, plus it was also a "Potter's Field" for people who had no other options for cemetery burial. I set up the cemetery and memorials on Find A Grave for all the persons listed in the burial book mentioned in this thread. It is filed as "County Home Cemetery" and has alternate names listed. From time to time, I try to find more information about the individuals so their stories are not lost forever. One of the burials is a man who was killed when a car hit him, and he was never in the infirmary. He had no contact information on his person. I have found all released US Census records for the building, regardless of its use at the time, and just comparing those to the cemetery listing is a story unto itself. For everyone who enjoys research and is working on their own families already, I encourage you to give some time to preserving the records of persons in all kinds of institutions. I've made a "Sharing Tree" for people who aren't my kin and have no other apparent researchers. You might be paying it forward for someone else who has hit a brick wall. Document the sites, too. I'm one of the last people to have photographed the infirmary before the fire. I was, therefore, shocked when I just happened to be driving by it when the first fire and police responders arrived as the smoke was starting to billow out of the top. I stopped and shot a short video and a few still pictures since traffic was being turned back anyway. By the time I left, there were many people catching the fire on video. Let's not wait till things are destroyed and people forgotten. Thanks, all who have commented in this thread. I have no connection to the facility or any of the people buried there. I just figure that somewhere, someone is documenting something I need, and I appreciate their help and am trying to help someone else.
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