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Charles Lepley Civil War Diary/Died Andersonville, Sept 1864

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Charles Lepley Civil War Diary/Died Andersonville, Sept 1864

Posted: 1050965156000
Classification: Military
Surnames: Lepley, Leply, Beighley
The following is a transcription of a diary passed down from Banjamin F Lepley [younger brother to Charles]. to his daughter Benja Lepley, my grandmother. It is a small 2 1/2" by 4" leather bound book published James J Purcell, New York.

Charles Lepley was the 10th of 12 children born to Michael Lepley and Catharena Beighle.
Jacob, Henry, Tobis, Isaac, John, William, Christian, Salome(died young), Charles, Emily, and Benjamin. They lived in Butler Co, PA. (Connoquenessing Twp 1830, Franklin Twp 1850 census).

Some names mentioned in the Diary are Weston Hall, Weber, Ellis, Kennedy, M Meyers, Wessel, Richard C Wick, Solomon Moses, Roscoe Warner, Harrison H Pugh, Chaplain Billingsly, Rev Rowlings, Rev Dickinson, Milton Myers, S.B. McCandlass, James Bracken, Sargent Logan, and Corporal Bertner.



Charles Lepley Diary
Co. E. 103rd Pa Vols
Plymouth, N.C.
Jan. 16th, 1864




Friday, January 1, 1864
Wrote a letter to Sister. Otherwise passed the Day foolishly wearily away with hardly a good resolution for the New Year or a regret for the follies of the past.
Here am I at Plymouth, North Carolina This 1st day of 1864 and may well ask where may I be one year from now but must wait for Time to answer.

Saturday, January 2, 1864
Dull and drearily the day
Slowly and wearily wears away
And Surely
But I think I’d better wake up if I can and Time if it didn’t pass less surely. Would perhaps pass more gayly, pleasantly, profitably and speedily away. Yes I often think I must only be dreaming and not really living because I’m most always sad and I see others enjoy themselves.

Sunday, January 3, 1864
On Picket duty on Extreme right post on the line. Warm and pleasant day.
On post with Roscoe Warner of the 85th N.Y. A Regular Pennsylvania Yankee from Potter Co. Pa. An agreeable fellow too.

Monday, January 4, 1864
A little wet this morning and rather unfavorable for catching Squirrels But we made out to destroy The Head quarters of 4 or 5 of them. But they made their escape to our disappointment and cost as I tore my Sock.
Keountersign “Santafe

Tuesday, January 5, 1864
Monthly inspection at 11 oc Rather wet for good business
Came very near Enlisting in the “Veteran Corps to day
About 500 of them turned out this evening and paraded the muddy streets by order of “Genl Wessle.

Wednesday, January 6, 1864
Blowing and
Raining and
Sleeting all day.
Vaccinations examined.

Thursday, January 7, 1864
On Picket on Red Hill post. Plastered the shanty and kept up a big fire and kept pretty comfortable in spite of the wind snow and ice and rain. Countersign Memphis

Friday, January 8, 1864
Came in off Picket and out of the rain to shake and freeze and things. With this ague and things its worse than mosquitoes.

Saturday, January 9, 1864
Ague and fever to day

Sunday, January 10, 1864
Cold clear and windy
Six Rebel deserters came in to day
Went to the Doctor this morning got 30 grains quinine Feel no better

Monday, January 11, 1864
Considerable better this morning but went to Doctor

Tueday, January 12, 1864
Read a letter with a Ring in it. Mailed a letter.
Made a Requisition for pr pants 1 shirt 2 pr socks

Wednesday, January 13, 1864
Raining all day Slightly

Thursday, January 14, 1864
On Picket on Lees Mill Road

Friday, January 15, 1864
The Dixie gals the Southners Pride
Graceful, Lovely and gay

Saturday, January 16, 1864
No entry

Sunday, January 17. 1864
No entry

Monday, January 18, 1864
A Small expedition Sailed This morning at 4 oc on the “Messasoit bound up Chowan River for Recruits to fill up some North Carolina Companys that are forming here
Refugees and Deserters are daily coming in and swelling our Ranks here.
[first letters of lines are in black ink and remainder in red ink]

Tuesday, January 19, 1864
Felt like Shaking this evening but prevented it by taking a dose of quinine which made me Sicker.
The weather is clear and windy and not very warm.
Rebel “ Longstreet reported advancing on this place with 40 thousand men
I think he’ll stand a good chance of getting his street Shortened.
[lines alternate black and red ink]

Wednesday, January 20, 1864
Detailed at 10 oc to relieve the Veterans that were on duty that they might be mustered in and on returning to camp at 4 oc was informed that I with 13 others were to get ready with 3 days rations to march at 7 oc It is now 6. At 8 oc 175 men Embarked on the Massasoit. At 12 oc 20 men of (sic) landed 7 miles below Harrellsville tried to Capture a picket post of guerrillas failed

Thursday, January 21, 1864
At 4 oc the Ballance (sic) landed 4 ½ miles from town. Marched up to town and Captured 6 mule teams, 8 horses, 5 hogheads of sugar salt pork in profusion. Were fired on by the Guerrillas had 1 man killed 1 wounded Captured 1 Rebel wounded
Returned to Plymouth at 7 oc.

Friday, January 22, 1864
Another expedition left to day at 12 oc
Sold a captured pipe for 26 cts
Rambling around through town inspecting the Captured Stock and waggons
There was on(e) Beautiful 2 horse Carriage valued at $5000.
A grand Consort this evening 25 cts Brahms

Saturday, January 23, 1864
A Splendid day and night for picket. My turn for standing was from 2 till ½ past 4 as ever decided by casting lots.
It was a beautiful Moonlight night and
Nothing to break the Quiet but
Stealthy Tread of Otter and Mink
and the plunging of Muskrat
in the sluggish water of the stinking Swamps
Mixed with the gentle splashing of the Alligator.

Sunday, January 24, 1864
A lovely Sabbath Morning without a darkening cloud or rude breath of wind.
Our new Chaplin preached to day but I wasn’t here to hear him but understand He did not make a favorable impression on the soldiers. He is of the Episcapalion (sic) Church
The 15th & 16th Connecticut landed here this Evening to Relieve our Veterans.

Monday, January 25, 1864
Myself had a Chill this morning and Racking fever all day.
Did nothing but lay in bed all day and bear it and such a beautiful day warm, sunny and airy
An Expedition went off to day and showed with one prisoner.

Tuesday, January 26, 1864
Fell (sic) a little better to day in spite of Dose the Doctor gave me yesterday But am sorry he had no Quinine to give me today.
Another Expedition to day

Wednesday, January 27, 1864
Expedition of 22nd Returned this evening by land with about 100 head of sheep and poultry in proportion Captured near lake “Phelps.
Connecticut troops Relieve our Picket this morning

Thursday, January 28, 1864
“Camp Guard to day. Verry (sic) warm
“Countersign “Vicksburgh.

Friday, January 29, 1864
Good Music I hear just now by the Brass Brigade Band of the Connecticut troops here.
Grand Consort at the M.E. Church this Evening
At 9 0c got orders to get ready immediately with 2 days rations. 10 oc found 60 of Regt on Massasoit. Sailed at 11 up the Roanoke

Saturday, January 30, 1864
We land at 4 oc 6 miles above Hamilton 500 strong and 1 piece Marine artillary
Marched 8 miles and come upon 300 Rebs at Windsor and Route them completely taking 3 prisoners and Instruments of a Brass Band. Burn their Barracks and return to the Boat at 5 oc. Arrive at Plymouth at 9

Sunday, January 31, 1864
At Church this Evening Preaching by the Chaplin of the 101st

Monday, February 1, 1864
Down at the market post this morning. An Expedition at 2 oc
Amador County
Fiddletown PO
California.
Fayette PO
Fayette County
Iowa
Tuesday, February 2, 1864
Expedition of 70 men to Edenton
Start from here at 11 oc Return at 8
While there an Old woman told me to be carefull of my gun and not let her children get Shot with it as she did not want her children shot by a Yanke or a Yankees gun ugh

Wednesday, February 3, 1864
Monthly inspection
The 15th Connecticut leaves for Newbern Had a chill to day

Thursday, February 4, 1864
Another shake
18 Transports with Reenforcments (sic) for Newbern passed Roanoke Island today

Friday, February 5, 1864
Still another shake was at the Doctor
Fighting reported continueing at Newbern
One Battery Captured by the Rebs and gunboat under water
Genrl Pickett in command of the Rebls (sic) forces

Saturday, February 6, 1864
At the doctors this morning
The troops at this place were all called out at 3 oc to watch the moon rising
Paid $15.00 to Harrison Pugh for a watch

Sunday, February 7, 1864
Was at the Doctor
Rec’d 2 letters from home Answer the same
Sent a Blue Back 5 dollar bill captured at Harrellsville Jan 21st `64

Monday, February 8, 1864
Clear windy and rather cool
Rebels Raise the siege at Newbern and Retreat towards Goldsboro. Reported to have been 15 thousand strong uner General Pickett and Ransom

Tuesday, February 9, 1864
On Provost Guard Clear and cool
two Rebel deserters came in to day. One from Stewarts Cavalry the other from the 11th NC
One man named Hughs in prison was conscripted paid 16.00 dollars for a substitute


Wednesday, February 10, 1864
Relieved of guard
Warm and pleasant weather
Dress parade every evening
No drill

Thursday, February 11, 1864
At Church this evening
Cooked a Chicken for supper

Friday, February 12, 1864
Sent for a pair of pant and a shirt

Saturday, February 13, 1864
Two companies of second Massachusetts heavy artillery landed here to Day to garrison the fort and let Veterans go home.

Sunday, February 14, 1864
At Church to day Preaching by Chaplain of 16th Connecticut
Again by Chaplain Billingly of 101st

Monday, February 15, 1864
Mailed a letter to SCR (presumed to be SC Roth)

Tuesday, February 16, 1864
On Camp guard post no 2.
Clear Cold and Windy

Wednesday, February 17, 1864
Relieved of guard
twas verry (sic) windy and verry cold last night
Countersign Lodi
Drawed clothing viz
1 pr Trowers 2.50
1 shirt 1.53
2 pr socks 32 per pr…64cts

Thursday, February 18, 1864
Pretty cold and windy
Commenced snowing finely about 9 oclock this evening

Friday, February 19, 1864
Sacra Mondue
Snow and freeze unto death. 2 inches deep and windy quantum sufficit
The sun shining Nevertheless

Saturday, February 20, 1864
28 Guerrillas were brought in this morning from Hyde County
41 negroes and 38 white Refugees came yesterday
Rect a package of papers from HWR (presumed to be HW Roth) Snow not going Detailed for carrying wood for kitchen

Sunday, February 21, 1864
Preaching to day by Rev Rowlings
Warm and snow disappearing
Detailed

Monday, February 22, 1864
Washingtons Birthday Celebrated by an address by Chap Billingsly of 101st
Music by the Band
Hail Columbia
Star Spangled Banner and the Doxology
Address at 6oc by the Rev Dickinson Chaplin 16 Conn Subject American Republic

Tuesday, February 23, 1864
Blank

Wednesday, February 24, 1864
Expedition up the Chowan [river] of 30 men on Genl Foster

Thursday, February 25, 1864
Expedition returned after capturing 1500 lbs tobacco and 2 negros (sic)
Shingles in the country are made of cyprus (sic) and juniper principally

Friday, February 26, 1864
Have a little Chill to day
A little chill is not such a little thing, either

Saturday, February 27, 1864
More Ague to day Received a letter from home. Tomorrow

Sunday, February 27, 1864
Inspection and whole regiment on picket with knapsacks included

Monday, February 28, 1864
Relieved of picket. Inspection and Mustered for 2 months pay and a miserable shake.

Tuesday, March 1, 1864
Shake again Went to the Doctor
An Expedition is ordered out with 2 days rations. Bumb Shell sent off up Chowan.

Wednesday, March 2, 1864
Shelling up the Chowan Rebels have a Battery on a bluff but are driven off and the Bumb Shell rescued by the Gunboats Southfield and Whitehead. At Doctors Got a Dose Worse


Thursday, March 3, 1864
Pretty well to day at again got some powders this morning
Warm pleasant day
Reports of Genrl Longstreet moving on Newbern

Friday, March 4, 1864
The 101st PV and 116 Connecticut were ordered away yesterday evening at 9 oc Destination supposed to be Newbern

Saturday, March 5, 1864
On Picket to day on Boyls Mill road Verry (sic) warm till 2 oc a heavy rain cooled the air and another shower at night made it cold and disagreable
Tying to fish in Welsh Creek

Sunday, March 6, 1864
Verry cold and cloudy and windy this morning
Countersign Snow Hill
At church by Rev Billingsly of the 101st

Monday, March 7, 1864
Warm again as usual to day
Great and exciting game of Ball in which Chaplain Rowlings figures conspicuously

Tuesday, March 8, 1864
A little rain this morning
Detailed for Provost Guard 30,000 Rebels reported moving on Norfolk

Wednesday, March 9, 1864
Relieved of Guard
fine morning A small mail came in on the Lancer last night

Thursday, March 10, 1864
Mailed a letter to sister
An Expedition on the Dollie last night a 9 oc Started to go up the Chowan for a Refugee but wind being high on the Sound the waves came near breaking over her, compelling her to Retreat for fear of drowning

Friday, March 11, 1864
Made a Gutta percha Ring


Saturday, March 12, 1864
Detailed for Picket but traded with H Pugh for Provost guard
Two refugee from Petersburgh are in the jail They give woefull account of affairs
Qoute [quote] Meal at 30 doll per bushel sometimes none to be had at that
Hotel meals 8 dollars
A small drink of Whiskey 2.50.


Sunday, March 13,1864
Relieved of guard. Dress parade at 5 oc Warm and verry pleasant

Monday, March 14, 1864
On Picket on Reserve post pleasant enough this morning gets cloudy and windy and cool towards night at 12 oc night begins to snow and blow but not freez it continues to snow till near morning
Drawed $2.00 sutler Check paid 30 [sutler was a person who followed the army and sold food, liquor etc to soldiers]

Tuesday, March 15, 1864
Several inches of snow fell last night but now at 12 0c it has almost disappeared by the influence of the Sun. Yesterday I Drawed 1 pr Pantaloons & 1 pr shoes.

Wednesday, March 16, 1864
This is a Blunder
To day I was relieved of picket and last night the snow fell etc
“Countersign Bachelors Creek
Recd 3 copies of the Lutheran

Thursday, March 17, 1864
On Picket to day again On post on Right of Acre Road
Very pleasant day and night
Colonel Maxwell officer of day

Friday, March 18, 1864
Relieved of Picket at 10 oc. Countersign “West point.
This evening the Veteran of 101st arrived from Roanoke Island
Talk of the Rebel Ram coming down the River to day

Saturday, March 19, 1864
Four escaped prisoners arrived here to day from Richmond. Were captured at Catletts Station last October. Were being conveyed from Richmond to Georgia Jumped out of the cars arrived after being 13 days in the swamp 2 were from N Jersy (sic) 2 from NYC
Detailed for loading Rations Draw Ham 2 next time


Sunday, March 20, 1864
Rain last night and cold and windy this morning
Had a chill this evening didn’t go on dress parade

Monday, March 21, 1864
Went to doctor this morning got 80 gr pow
A slight chill in the evening
Commenced snowing a little this morning about 8 oc Continued all day snowing and blowing

Tuesday, March 22, 1864
This is another error
Inspection as usual A Rain last night and cool this morning
Prisoners yesterday Reported 14 persons froze to death on Belle Island 2nd morning January. Snowed and(sic) all night and all day. At Doctors this morning

Wednesday, March 23, 1864
2 inches of snow pretty well friz this morning Commenced last night
went to Doctors this morning
Warmer to day and snow melting away
The 16th Connecticut arrived here again from Newbern

Thursday, March, 24, 1864
Feel pretty well this morning. Pretty hard freeze last night but the Remaining Snow is fast disappearing
An order for drill 2 hours a day from 10 am to 11, from 3 to 4 Batallion drill

Friday, March 25, 1864
Raining some today and cold
A Rebel was brought in to day that had been working on the Rebel Ram
An attack is expected

Saturday, March 26, 1864
On Provost guard
middling warm this morning but verry cool toward night
a Small Reconnoisance goes up the River on Massasoit and Returns and goes again

Sunday, March 27, 1864
This morning at 4 oc havenot Returned yet at 4 PM
Was at Church this evening Preaching by Chaplain of the 16th Conn Text 1st Peter 1st Chap latter part 12 verse

Monday, March 28, 1864
Drill at 10 oc to 11 AM and from 3 to 4 PM Dress parade from 5 to 6 Went at 8 oc to load wood get back just in time for drill

Tuesday, March 29, 1864
Commenced to Rain at 8 oc this morning
Recd 2 letter one from “Em one from S.C.R [Em may be his sister Emily]

Wednesday, March 30, 1864
On Provost Guard post no4 Cold rain Paymaster “Major “Crane came in at 3 oc from Norfolk on the “Tug S.C Brooks.

Thursday, March 31, 1864
Relieved of guard The 101st PV is being paid to day They get The 100 dollars old bounty and 60 of the new with 3 months wages

Friday, April 1, 1864
A little wet and cool to day
company drill from 10 to 11 Brigade ordered ---? Day commencing at 2 oc
The 88 N.Y. is being paid to day None but Veterans get their pay.

Saturday, April 2, 1864
On Picket on the Right post on Acre Road A cold wet disagreeable day
Part of our Regiment were paid to day

Sunday, April 3, 1864
Relieved of Picket at 10 oc “Countersign “Calladale”
Recd a letter from “Em.

Monday, April 4, 1864
Mailed a letter for ‘E.E.L. [could be sister Emily Elisabeth Lepley]

Tuesday, April 5, 1864
Company E Veterans are paid Barrowed $1.00 from Milton Myers paid .50 for Butter 5 for Honey 10 for walnuts
Rather cold and unpleasant a little Rain

Wednesday, April 6, 1864
On Provost Guard Still cold and Cloudy and windy

Thursday, April 7, 1864
Relieved of guard On company drill from 10 to 11 Batallion Drill from 2 till 5 I escaped from it and had chill at 5 PM

Friday, April 8, 1864
Went to the “Doctor this morning have headache all day
Sold Watch to H.H. Pugh at $21.50
Recd a package of papers from H.W.R. Another chill at 8 oc

Saturday, April 9, 1864
Was at the Doctor this morning excused of duty
Recd a copy of the Missionary from Home Raining all day
paid Milton “Myers $1.00

Sunday, April 10, 1864
At the Doctor this morning Clear warm and pleasant
At Church at 10 a.m. by Chaplain 16th And at 2 P.M. by Rev Rowlings in the Brick Church The first service in it since we came here

Monday, April 11, 1864
Brigade Drill from 2 till 5 Fair and warm

Tuesday, April 12, 1864
Company drill A little rain in the afternoon.
Bought a watch from SB McCandlass for $13.00 Sold the same to James “Bracken at $13.50

Wednesday, April 13, 1864
Detailed for Police and Escaped drill Right warm and pleasant again

Thursday, April 14, 1864
Warm and pleasant Company and Brigade drill

Friday, April 15, 1864
A little Rain and no drill Buying and trading Watches

Saturday, April 16, 1864
On Camp guard. [a paragraph is crossed out]
Not on guard This [paragraph] is a mistake

Sunday, April 17, 1864
On Camp guard
The Rebels attack our pickets at 4 oc P.M. Two companies of Cavelry charge on the Rebels and are Repulsed with the loss of 2 men killed one missing 1 Lieut wounded.
Our Forts open on the Rebels at 6 oc PM and a Sharp shirmish takes place up at Warren neck.

Monday, April 18, 1864
All was quiet last night But the ball opens just at sunrise and continues to Roll until this time 9oc. A Captain of the 16 is wounded
Our Pickets hold their ground and firing is kept up all day on the line. The Rebels advance in force at 6 oc PM and drive our pickets in and open with artillery

Tuesday, April 19, 1864
The firing yesterday evening continued 2 hours. The Bombshell and Whitehead are were sunk also
This morning the firing commenced at 3 oc and The Ram sinks the Southfield and chases the Miami off and fires on the town from below. The Rebles also captured Fort Wessle at daylight and are now firing on us from it We Build bomb proofs

Wednesday, April 20, 1864
Firing continued all night last night and the 101st Fort is Captured at daylight and the Rebels enter the town from both ends and we are surrounded and they have crossfire on us but we hold our works until 10 oc AM Wessel goes with a flag of truce and firing ceases for an hour and then commences but were forced to surrender about 11 oc AM.
The weather if fair. Sergent Logan killed and Corporal Bertner wounded.

Thursday, April 21, 1864
Fine morning and we are are(sic) living 1 mile from Town. The Rebels say they number 20,000 men in command of General Hoke
Started to March at 12 oc. Marched 15 miles and camped. 4 days ration were issued to us this morning, 32 hard tack 1 lb of pork

Friday, April 22, 1864
Williamston 13 minutes past 2 oc
started this morning at 6 oc
verry (sic) warm
Traveled about 12 miles to day Halted at 5 oc and are well treated
fine weather
Our guard is the 35 NC.

Saturday, April 23, 1864
Started at 6 oc Marched about 6 miles and Halted at Hamilton
distance 6 miles
{4 days Rations were issured to us this morning of our own Rations
32 hard tack and 1 lb of pork}this entry is crossed out and the word "not" writen over it

Sunday, April 24, 1864
Started 1/2 past 10 oc
Marched 10 miles
Camped in a wood
Our guard to day is the Alalcomb (?) [un readable word] and 17th NC
we are treated nice
A few drops of Rain

Monday, April 25, 1864
Fell in to line at 1/2 past 6. Arrived at Tau or, Taw, or Tar-bow at 12 M
Drawed Rations 1 pint of Meal and a little pork and peas for 2 men
Tuesday, April 26, 1864
The 88th were taken away at 10 oc without Rations The Rest of us are getting Rations "Ditto" Minus " pork
The 16th and part of the 101st left at 3 oc

Wednesday, April 27, 1864
No Rain yet verry (sic) warm
Drawed some Corn Meal and Onion 2 sides for 5 -6 men
a little salt
Have a Chill about 3 oc

Thursday, April 28, 1864
Sold a watch at $18.00
A sprinkle of Rain last night and to day
Took a dose of willow Tea this morning
Drew Rations
Meal, pork, peas salt

Friday, April 29, 1864
Fine morning and no rain yet
left Camp at 8 oc and Tarboro at 11 oc
Arrived at Goldsboro at at (sic) 5 oc distance60 miles
got some crackers and pork
Arrived Wilmington at 2 oc distance from Goldsboro 18 miles
Lot of cars at 6 oc crossed a river Cape fear River
There are 501 men in our train

Saturday, April 30, 1864
This morning at 7 oc Drawed soft bread about 3/4 of a lb
(can't read) and a small piece pork
left Wilmington at 12 oc Crossed The pee dee (?) Santee Rivers
distance from Wilmington to Charleston 205 miles

Sunday, May 1, 1864
arrived at Charleson at 7oc am left at 10 amrossed Savanah River at 6 oc and were in Georgia
Changed Cars at 3 miles (?E or S) of Savannah at 8 oc
from Charleston to Savannah 100 miles
Started for Americus by way of Macon
drawed Boiled pork an crackers
Rain this evening
Chill to day

Monday,May 2, 1864
Arrived at Macon at 12 oc from Savannah {?19 oc?} Arrived near Americus at Camp about 8 oc
Marched a few Rods from the cars and laid down for night

Tuesday, May 3, 1864
We are (?Counted?) of in messes of 90 men and an orderly sergent to draw rations and are marched 1 mile from road to camp with about 11000 more prisoners
drawe (sic) pork meal soap
Had a chill at 3 oc
We have Roll Call every morning at 8 oc [this last line is in ink, all the previous days are in pencil since his capture on the 20th]

Wednesday, May 4, 1864
It is very warm through the day and cold at night
Rations to day Ditto [this line is crossed out]
Rations for 1 man 1 day 1 quart of Meal and 1/4 lb of pork and a little salt
Confederate money is selling for 20 cts on the dollar in Greenbacks

Thursday, May 5, 1864
Rations of Meal and 3 spoonfulss (sic) of Molasses to a man and 1/4 lb of pork for 4 men
A squad of 25 or 30 men Escaped from prison last night through a tunnel and The Rebels have Hounds after them
Wrote a letter to Mother

Friday, May 6, 1864
Still verry warm
Ration of Meal 1 pt and 1/4 lb pork and 1 pt Rice for 4 men

Saturday, May 7, 1864
The Weather Remains the same
Rations of Baked corn 3 loaves to 4 men and Boiled pork 1/4 lb to 1 man
Three Rebel officers Ride through and inspect the camp

Sunday, May 8, 1864
A little warmer to day
Rations still smaller 2 loaves to 4 and a small piece of meat
The Three Officers Ride thrugh camp again to day
Rumors that Plymouth is Retaken

Monday, May 9, 1864
Had a chill and Fever to day about 3 oc
Eggs are selling at 10 dollars a Confederate or 2 dolls Greenbacks pr doz Bacon 5 confed or 1 Green Beans 2.00 per pot
Rations Do[ditto]
Tuesday, May 10, 1864
Still verry warm and sign of Rain
All kinds of Rumors are afloat about Exchanging Prisoners
Rations of Bread 66 loaves for 90 men
Rumors today that Fort Darling is ours

Wednesay, May 11, 1864
Another Chill today
Commenced Raining last night at 3 oc Rained Slightly all night and to day
Rebels say that "Lee Sold Richmond to Grant
Rather too cool for us this morning

Thursday, May 12, 1864
Went to the Doctor this morning but had no chill to day Got 4 little Black quinine pills
About one half of the prisoner got a little boiled rice today and a little less pork and bread instead
9 (8 crossed out) Prisoners Came in to [day] Captured at Dalton

Friday, May 13, 1864
At Doctors again this morning Cloudy and Cool A few more prisoners Come in to day
We get about 1 pt of Boiled Rice Mixed with pitch and a little less meat and Bread
Had a shake to day Was at the doctors

Saturday, May 14, 1864
A "Chill to day and high fever was at the Doctors
A few prisoners came in to day
Dalton reported surrounded by Genrl Thomas with 150000 men
The Rebellious Have a picnic in sight of Camp to day

Sunday, May 15, 1864
A Chill to day was at The doctor Weather of little more comfortable
A man with one leg was shot by the guard
Another tunnel was discovered to day
Rations of Vinegar issued to about 1/2 the prisoners

Monday, May 16, 1864
At the doctors again this morning feel pretty well No shake to day Rations as usual
Genrls Longstreet and Lee both reported wounded Mortally and Grant Moving closely on Richmond

Tuesday, May 17, 1864
Took 3 pills to day, feel better
Some prisoners were brought in to day They report Dalton in
our Possession with 4000 prisoners
They were captured on the 12th
They also report that a General Exchange of prisoners (have crossed out) has been agreed upon The weather still cool and cloudy
12 men that escaped last friday
night were brought in again to day

Wenesday, May 18, 1864
Am first rate to day Rations of Beans are issued to 1/2 the
camp to day
Our wounded are brought from Plymouth
and 12 more prisoners captured at
Dalton They report in our possession

Thursday, May 19, 1864
Fine day Everything quiet in camp
we get rations of Beans. Slop
The Macon Confederate of the 18th is
in camp They report no news from
Richmond since the 9. But that their army is being Victorious
in all points.

Friday, May 20, 1864
No News today
Dr E is digging a well. A(nd) is 15 feet to watter(sic)
Rations as usual plus a little soft soap

Saturday, May 21, 1864
A little excitement about Exchange
Reports of a General Order being issued by the Rebel authorities That all prisoners must be Exchanged or paroled (or crossed out) within 30 days.

Sunday, May 22, 1864
Three or four hundred more prisoners were
brought in to day Some from Danville and some from
Meades Army captured on the 5th.
The Rebels are taking prisoners out to work at enlarging the Stockade.

Monday, May 23, 1864

very warm to day About 1000 prisoners were brought in today from Meades Army Captured at Mine Run on the 3rd and 6th

Tuesday, May 24, 1864
6 or 7 hundred more prisoners were brought in to day from Meades Army
Had a chill today at 3 oc

Wednesday, May 25, 1864
Had a shower of rain last night. Still very warm
About 1500 prisoners were brought in from Meades army
(on the 24th written between the lines) in which wer (sic) some of the 11th Reserves
And 7 or 800 more came in today.

Thursday, May 26, 1864
Had a Shake and severe fever Great excitement to day about paroling

Friday, May 27, 1864
Nothing unusual occurs to day Except that the Rebs are pretty badly
Scared and Examine The Stockade and a double guard on and line of
Battle formed on all sides having been Reinforced also giving us a Caution
against forcing the Stockade

Saturday, May 28, 1864
Had a severe Chill and fever. Took a dose of nine.
A few prisoners were brought in from Sherman's Army Captured 20 miles beyond Atlanta

Sunday, May 29, 1864
About 900 more prisoners were brought in to day from Meade's and Segels Army Captured on the 14th/15th
Very fine day
Orderly got a letter from R R Bryson from Macon he reports that They have no Shelter and not half enough to eat
Took some more Medicine

Monday, May 30, 1864
Another shake to day Very warm Took some more Medicine
About 900 more prisoners were brought in from Shermans and Butlers Army
The colonel Commanding this post says we will all be out
of this inside of 13 days

Tuesday, May 31, 1864
Fell (sic) pretty well no shakes Took some medicine
Reports that Atlanta is ours
The Macon papers claim continual victories for their armies

Wednesday, June 1, 1864
Had a Shake to day and Severe fever A Heavy rain to day about 12 oc

Thursday, June 2, 1864
A little more Ague & fever
Still take (fever crossed out) medicine
More Rain to day
8 or 9 hundred more prisoners came in to day

Friday, June 3, 1864
Escaped the Shake to day
Another Heavy Rain
4 or 5 hundred more prisoners were brought in to day

Saturday, June 4, 1864
Raining again this morning

Sunday, June 5, 1864
Raining all day and gave us a good cooling

Monday, June 6, 1864
Heavy Showers
Many Reports are going around in Camp of a speedy Parol (sic)of all prisoners on both sides

Tuesday, June 7, 1864
Verry Hot to day and looks like Rain
About 500 more prisoners were brought in from Grants Army and from Bell Island
They Report "Lee driven inside his fortifications (near crossed out) at Richmond

Wednesday, June 8, 1864
Another shower of Rain to day Nights are verry warm. Everything is Dull in Camp no News
Confederate Money is played out entirely in Camp.
Biscuit are selling at 50 cts a piece Onions 1.00 for largest Eggs 3 for 1.00 or 4.00 pr dozen

Thursday, June 9, 1864
A little rain to day and Cool and pleasant
Cheering News in camp this evening It is said (in) The Rebel papers that Atlanta
and Richmond are both in the hands of the Yankees.
It Causes a Rise spirits and great hopes of getting out of prison

Friday June 10, 1864
A Hot sun part of the day but verry Cool fresh breeze and looks like rain

Saturday, June 11, 1864
More Rain to day Had a chill and severe fever this afternoon eat no supper
Another excitement about paroling

Sunday, June 12, 1864
Cloudy and cool Fell (sic) pretty well Eat 2 biscuit for breakfast
News this morning that our officers are paroled and we are to follow

Monday, June 13, 1864
Cloudy all day the sun only got one peep at us and it is very cold with a mist
Have a tremendous Shake from 9 oc AM till 1oc PM
We have no Roll call

Tuesday, June 14, 1864
Still cloudy and cold with a light mist and no sunshine
Went to the Doctor This morning
New Potatoes in camp 1.00 pr qt Cucumbers 50 cts for 1 Beets Do Raddishes(sic) Do
Onions 1.00

Wednesday, June 15, 1864
Rain again to day
Was at Doctors Took 7 pills and Had a severe "Chill" Shake about 9 oc and pain with Bowels

Thursday, June 16, 1864
More Rain And about 2000 prisoners were brought in to A(nd)
Heard that Henry (his brother) was wounded Have a feve (sic) all day and no appetite all

Friday, June 17, 1864
The more Rain the more rest
was at the Doctors this morning. Fell (sic) better this morning
Got some Whiskey this evening

Saturday, June 18, 1864
Fell (sic) some better to day Was at the Doctor again
Have some Diarhea and Can't eat
Still very wet weather Cheering news from our Armies

Sunday, June 19, 1864
No better to day was at the doctor
Rain to day again 7 more men were shot to day by the guard

Monday, June 20, 1864
Feel pretty well was not at the Doctor
Rain Showers to day Blackberries and Apples for sale in camp Berries

Tuesday, June 21, 1864
Better this morning
But verry slim

Wednesday, June 22, 1864
No rain to day Fell(sic) pretty well
Biscuit flour Onions are verry plenty and cheaper today
No news and things begin to look gloomy The Rebels find a tunnel completed


Thursday, June 23, 1864
Feel Better to day Washed a shirt and myself
About 200 more prisoners came in to day from Grants Army
They report him advancing on Petersburg

Friday, June 24, 1864
Took a dose of my Medicine this morning
A few more prisoners were brought in to day from Grants Army
Report Peterburgh in our possession Borrowed $10.00 of Weston Hall

Saturday, June 25, 1864
Verry warm but no rain
Great excitement about an exchange of prisoners to commence on the 7th July

Sunday, June 26, 1864
Feel a little Agueish to day Took some medicine
We have had no Roll Call for near week
47 Detachment went out for wood 18 men go evry(sic) day
to carry wood for 270 & is barely sufficient

Monday , June 27, 1864
Another hot day Feel better A few more prisoners were brought in to day that
were captured at Paines mills a month ago

Tuesday, June 28, 1864
Two fine showers of Rain

Wednesday, June 29, 1864
Cool and pleasant to day
Captain Wirs (?) Comanding Camp and quartermaster take the Raiders out of camp A Dead man is found buried near one of Their tents A jury of 12 Sargeants is taken out to try them.

Thursday, June 30, 1864
Captain Wirs issues an order for all men who had watches taken from them at Richmond to report at the Gate tomorrow evening to get them returned

Friday, July 1, 1864
An addition to the Stockade is finished to day and 49 detachments are taken out into it
A verry hot day I saw large new tomatoses (sic) in camp for sale to day
Great excitement again about an exchange Commencing of the 7th inst.

Saturday, July 2, 1864
Warmest day yet
Was over in the new stockade to see "Weber, Ellis & Kennedy
Reports in Camp that the guards say Richmond is in our hands and is (in) Peterburgh

Sunday, July 3, 1864
Had Roll Call this morning verry hot
no excitemnet here about the memorable (4 crossed out) Fourth of July
The paroled officers are Reported to be here to witness the Exhange which is to commence on the 7th

Monday, July 4, 1864
Warm and clear till toward (evening crossed out) noon and we had 2 fine showers
The Rebles are Reorganizing the Detachments in Camp The 44th(? 47th) is changed to the 96 Everything is quiet

Tueday, July 5, 1864
To day 13 thousand (line is crossed out)

Wednesday, July 6, 1864
blank page

Thursday, July 7, 1864
Have the Diarhea to(day) and feel bad
The Exchange passed off verry quietly too(sic) day. But the 16th is certain

Friday, July 8, 1864
Worse to Day

Saturday, July 9, 1864
Rain to day Very bad last night

Sunday, July 10, 1864
blank page

Monday, July 11, 1864
Six Raiders that were Sentenced to be Hung were Executed to day
Am Better

Tuesday, July 12, 1864
Am great deal better M Myers was taken to the Hospital
Verry warm
About 300 prisoners were brought in to day Grants Army
Reports that the parole Commences the 16th inst according our paper

Wednesday, July 13, 1864
Still some better Verry Hot day

Thursday, July 14, 1864
[blank page]

Friday, July 15, 1864
Verry warm This day and all quiet

Saturday, July 16, 1864
Not so well these days

Sunday, July 17, 1864
The Rebs fired 2 cannon as a signal for all troops to fall in in (sic) Readiness for any Emergency.

Monday, July, 18, 1864
Prisoners were brought in Captured 7 miles other side Atlanta

Tuesday, July 19, 1864
Reports in camp that “Shermans Cavalry is at Macon
Report also that Atlanta is in our possion (sic) and The Rebel “Johnson is Relieved of his Command

Wednesday, July 20, 1864
Great excitement about “Genrl Shermans Cavalry Coming to Release us
The “Rebels are fortyfying and Renforcing (sic) the guard
Heard a Sermon preached in Camp this evening. Preaching has been kept up for over a week

Thursday, July 21, 1864
The Rebs are Bringing woman and Children here from Atlanta and are hurying (sic) up works of defence around the Camp and Car loads of Soldiers are arriving to day
Am still no Better of Diarrhoaa (sic)

Friday, July 22, 1864
Several Hundred prisoners arrived to do (sic) from Grants army with no verry (sic) encouraging Reports
Middling Cool and pleasant

Saturday, July 23, 1864
The Old Story of a parole to commence on the 7th is Strongly Revived to day
Reports that the Commissioners of Exchange met at Wilmington on the 20th and agreed on a Parole of 3 months and then exchange This is the Coolest day since we have been in here Feel worse to day

Sunday, July 24, 1864
A Cool Breeze is going to day last night was Remarkably cool. Not so well to day

Monday, July 25, 1864
Very Cool and cloudy with a few showers
A man was Shot by the guard

Tuesday, July 26, 1864
Got some pills to Day am pretty Bad
Over a Hundred prisoners Came in from Grants Army
A large Tunnel was discovered to day 14 feet deep
Negroes are Employed to fill it up

Wednesday, July 27, 1864
No Better to day taking some more pills
Another man shot by the guard
The excitement about Parole is still kept up

Thursday, July 28, 1864
About 500 Prisoners were Brought in to day from Shermans army Captured within 1 mile of Atlanta
A shot was fired over Camp by the Rebs to prevent a Break being made by the prisoners

Friday, July 29, 1864
Several Hundred Prisoners Came in this morning
feel Better to day The sky is Cloudy and Threatning (sic) Rain Middling pleasant with a low breeze that arises eery (sic) morning about 9 oc or 10 oc

Saturday, July 30, 1864
I feel not better Diarrhoa bad
Reports that a Cavalry Raid is at Macon shelling the town
Great Excitement about Exchange
The Rebels are Building Forts and Mounting Guns

Sunday, July 31, 1864
Am worse to day
Cloudy all day and a Shower in the Evening
[on same page written in hand]
The 1st Aug
Col Winder and Capt “Wirs and a Minister visited the Camp
The Minister Red (sic) an extract from the NY (?) Herald that the Commisioners had met 3 times and it was hoped had agreed upon an Exchange

Monday, August 1, 8164
A little better to day Cloudy and Cool with a little Rain Nights pretty warm

Tuesday, August 2, 1864
Not so well today We had a heavy Shower of Rain this evening
The Sick are being taken out ot the rate of 4 to a Detachment Such as are not able to take care of themselves
Report say they are to be taken to our lines at Hilton Head to the Hospital
They are dying at Rate of 50 and 60 per day

Wednesday, August 3, 1864
Another Yankee was shot by the guard
Seven or eight hundred sick were taken out to day it said by some a train load was taken away
Verry (sic) Hot these days
Reported that Gen Stoneman was captured at Macon

Thursday, August 4, 1864
No sick were taken out to day
No Roll Call
A few prisoners were brought in Shermans Army

Friday, August 5, 1864
About 100 more prisoners were brought in from Shermans army They Report Atlanta surrendered
About 100 sick were taken out to day such are not able to walk
Feel worse do day

Saturday, August 6, 1864
A little Better to day
Another Yanke was shot today
No sick were taken out
A Macon paper stated that 2 train loads of Yankee sick passed though there

Sunday, August 7, 1864
Verry warm to day and I feel worse with Diarrhoea
The Exchange excitement has considerably abated and all is quiet

Monday, August 8, 1864
Warm and Cloudy and and (sic) Heavy Rain about 4 oc
The Exchange story is Revisited this morning
21 men were sent from Here for our lines
Three men were sent with Petition to our Government for our speedy Release.

Tuesday, August 9, 1864
A few more Prisoners were brought in to day from Shermans Army none are arriving from Grants Army
Another Heavy Rain the Evening which caused about 40 Rods of the Stockade to fall and no little excitement among the Rebs
Am some Better

Wednesday, August 10, 1864
Another Heavy shower this Evening
Feel better to day
Macon papers in Camp to day state “General” Wessel has been Exchanged with our line officers and Great Hopes are had of our speedy Release.
Sick call to day I went to the Doctor for Diarhoa and sore mouth

Thursday and Friday, August 11 and 12, 1864 are blank

Saturday, August 13, 1864
The Excitement about Exchange is verry (sic) high
The Quartermast tells some are to leave here on Monday That the Exchange is going on as fast as possible

Sunday, August 14, 1864
Verry Hot and Heavy Rain is the Evening Rations are verry scarse in Camp
Pork selling from 20 to 30 ctc a Ration

Monday, August 15, 1864
Verry hot to day
Started to the Doctor but gave out and came Back
About 600 sick were taken out 1
It is [in?] the Herald and Phad. Inquirier that Genrl Wessle and the Rest of our field Officiers are Exchanges
Verry feeble to day
The most Beautiful Rain Bow I ever saw just at sun down

Tuesday, August 16, 1864
Clear this morning and very hot through the Day
Saw an Artist taking a Picture of the Camp on both sides of the Brook from Post No 17 at the lower side of the camp today. Verry warm in the afternoon
Our Rations tonight are ½ Ration cooked Beans ½ Ration corn Bread and 1 full Ration of Cooked Beef No news of importance

Wednesday, August 17, 1864
Clear this morning and very warm through the day and suffer considerably with heat these days There was about Thirty (30) Prisoners came in today from Different parts of the army. They bring no late news that can be considered reliable
Rations tonight 1 Ration cooked Beef ½ corn bread & ½ of very good cooked Beans

Thursday, August 18, 1864
Clear this morning as usual and about as warm through the Day as has been for some days back
Nothing strange or very important going on that I can hear of
The Cars have been running very busy for the last 48 hours
Probably they are laying in the next ten days Rations for us
Rations Cooked Beans ½ corn Bread ½ of Cooked Beef 1 Ration

Friday, August 19, 1864
Cloudy this morning but soon cleared off
The air grew very hot & sultry as the day advanced
We had a heavy shower of rain about dark & good prospect of putting in a wet night
Rations tonight 1Pint cooked beans ½ ration corn bread ¼ ration cooked Pork and ¼ ration cooked beef

Saturday, August 20, 1864
Foggy this morning the fog lifted about 8 o clock A.M. and came down again about 11 o clock A.M. in the shape of a heavy shower of rain
Wet and uncomfortable all afternoon Prospect of a wet damp night
At Dark One of our Co WW Davis Received a Letter from home this evening the first that has come [-of at?-] here
Rations ¼ cornbread ½ beans, ¼ cooked Beef and a smell of cooked Pork

Sunday, August 21, 1864
Cloudy and very foggy this morning The air feels Damp & cool and kept about the same all Day. There is no news in camp that can be considered Reliable probably because there was no Prisoners came in today
One drew no Rations toight except about (8?) ounces of corn- bread half cooked that and water had to make our Supper

Monday, August 22, 1864
Foggy this morning and very damp but quite pleasant through the Day. We had to fast this morning till about 10 o clock & then we drew a double Ration of cooked Beef and Beans We drew ½ Ration corn Bread ½ cooked Beans and a pretty good Ration of cooked Beef in the evening.
No news of any kind that may be considered Reliable tonight.

Tuesday, August 23, 1864
It’s quite foggy this morning but warm Kept warm all day. There has [been] no late taken Prisoner came in and of course a stagnation in late news although all kinds of rumors are constantly afloat in the camp but They are not worth listening to.
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ corn Bread and 1 good Ration cooked Beef

Wednesday, August 24, 1864
Clear and pleasant this morning. Warm through the Day. Richard C Wick [Co E, 103rd PA Vols}Died last night at 9 O clock he has been ill for about a Month.
Abour 100 Prisoners came in today they report Kilpatrick out with the Cavalry on another Raid Where he is going to is not known.
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ corn Bread and a small ration cooked beef

Thursday, August 25, 1864
Clear and very warm all Day There is no late news or strange ones either in Camp Nothing going on inside the camp except the Issuing of Rations to the Prisoners that takes up almost the entire Day now.
Our Rations this Evening is 5 spoonfuls Molasses ½ Ration Corn Bread and about ½ pint of Cooked Rice
Starvation indeed almost

Friday, August 26, 1864
The sun rose very clear this morning The Day was hot and sultry. There is no news of any kind afloat today. One of the so called Regulators while the Rations were being issued today struck a Man over the head Breaking his skull and killing him almost instantly.
Rations ½ corn bread ½ cooked Beans and 5 spoonfuls Molasses

Saturday, August 27, 1864
Clear and warm all Day. There is nothing special as yet going on that I can learn. Still a great deal of talk of Exchange but all talk to us so far I would like very well to see something doing but I am still content to wait longer.
Rations tonight ½ corn Bread ½ cooked Rice 1/3 raw Beef

Sunday, August 28, 1864
Clear this morning and very pleasant all Day the sun is not too hot or the air too cool to feel well
There is a great many stories going today about us being exchanged soon some of them appear to have come pretty strength [?strong?] yet they may be false
Rations tonight ½ cooked Beans in forenoon
½ corn Bread in afternoon
1 Cooked Beef in afternoon
I guess that is all

Monday, August 29, 1864
Cloudy and very cool last night & this morning Kept cool all forenoon but changed and got warmer at noon very warm in afternoon
Soloman Moses Died last night about 8 Oclock of Dysentery
There is nothing new in Camp that I can hear of all old stories
Rations ½ Ration corn Bread
½ Ration Cooked Beans and a very little Pork

Tuesday, August 30, 1864
Clear and very warm all day There is still some talk of a speedy Exchange Some say that the Papers state that the Commisioners have met and agreed on a General Exhange of Prisoners on both sides but I do not know how it is all we can do is to wait and hope
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ Beef in forenoon
½ corn Bread in afternoon
1 Ration cooked Beef at Dark

Wednesday, August 31, 1864
Cloudy this morning but soon cleared off and got quite warm was warm the remainder of the Day
We can hear nothing but talk of Exchange but so far there is more noise than Proof” [?]
We are getting very tired of this place our rations are so small at present
Rations ½ corn Bread 1/2 cooked Beans 1 Ration cooked Beef & a little smell of Pork

Thursday, September 1, 1864
Clear this morning but pretty cold for this time of year The Musketoes are very bad at night they torment us so that one can hardly sleep A Serg’t of Detachment killed a man on the North side by stabbing him last evening
No late reliable news
Rations Cooked Rice & Beef in forenoon ½ each
½ Ration corn Bread in evening with some Pork

Friday, September 2, 1864
Very cool last night but clear this morning and very (sic) all Day
The Rebels took out some of the Colored Soldiers this evening it is said that they were formerly Slaves I do not know it (sic) that is true of not
This like everything else looks like Exchange to us
Rations tonight 1 Ration cooked Beef
½ Ration cooked Beans
½ Ration cooked corn Bread
This fills the page




This is the last daily entry in the Diary. Charles died September 11, 1864 of Dysentery. He is buried at Andersonville, grave # 8405


The pages for September 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th are missing.
The pages for September 7th, 8, and 9th and blank.

On pages for September 10th and 11th and for September 14th and 15th the following poem is written. Pages for 12th and 13th are blank. The ink is very faded and difficult to read:

When our country called for men we came from forge & store
From workshop, farm and factory our broken ranks to fill
We left our quiet happy homes & ones we loved so well
To vanquish all our Union foes or fall where others fell
Now in prison drere we languish & it is our constant cry
Oh ye who yet can save us will you leave us here to die?

The voice of slander tells you that our hearts were weak with fear
That all or nearly all of us were captured in the rear
The sores upon our bodies from musket ball & shell
The missing legs and shattered arms a truer tale will tell
We tried to do our duty in sight of God on high
Oh ye who yet can save us will ye leave us here to die?

There are heart the hope still beating in our pleasant northern homes
Waiting for the footsteps that may never never come
In southern prison pining meger pale and gaunt
Growing weaker weaker daily from pinching cold and want
There brother, sons and husbands pine and helpless captives lie
Oh, ye who yet can save us, will ye leave us here to Die?


From out our prison gate there’s a graveyard close at hand
Where lie 12 thousand Union men beneath the Georgia sand
Scores and scores are laid beside them as day succeeds to day
And thus it will be ever till all shall pass away.
And the last can say when dying with upturned & glazing eye,
Both love and faith are dead at home, they have left us here to die.



This poem has apparently shown up in various prisoners writings and no one knows for sure who the original author was.






















































Charles Lepley Diary
Co. E. 103rd Pa Vols
Plymouth, N.C.
Jan. 16th, 1864




Friday, January 1, 1864
Wrote a letter to Sister. Otherwise passed the Day foolishly wearily away with hardly a good resolution for the New Year or a regret for the follies of the past.
Here am I at Plymouth, North Carolina This 1st day of 1864 and may well ask where may I be one year from now but must wait for Time to answer.

Saturday, January 2, 1864
Dull and drearily the day
Slowly and wearily wears away
And Surely
But I think I’d better wake up if I can and Time if it didn’t pass less surely. Would perhaps pass more gayly, pleasantly, profitably and speedily away. Yes I often think I must only be dreaming and not really living because I’m most always sad and I see others enjoy themselves.

Sunday, January 3, 1864
On Picket duty on Extreme right post on the line. Warm and pleasant day.
On post with Roscoe Warner of the 85th N.Y. A Regular Pennsylvania Yankee from Potter Co. Pa. An agreeable fellow too.

Monday, January 4, 1864
A little wet this morning and rather unfavorable for catching Squirrels But we made out to destroy The Head quarters of 4 or 5 of them. But they made their escape to our disappointment and cost as I tore my Sock.
Keountersign “Santafe

Tuesday, January 5, 1864
Monthly inspection at 11 oc Rather wet for good business
Came very near Enlisting in the “Veteran Corps to day
About 500 of them turned out this evening and paraded the muddy streets by order of “Genl Wessle.

Wednesday, January 6, 1864
Blowing and
Raining and
Sleeting all day.
Vaccinations examined.
Thursday, January 7, 1864
On Picket on Red Hill post. Plastered the shanty and kept up a big fire and kept pretty comfortable in spite of the wind snow and ice and rain. Countersign Memphis

Friday, January 8, 1864
Came in off Picket and out of the rain to shake and freeze and things. With this ague and things its worse than mosquitoes.

Saturday, January 9, 1864
Ague and fever to day

Sunday, January 10, 1864
Cold clear and windy
Six Rebel deserters came in to day
Went to the Doctor this morning got 30 grains quinine Feel no better

Monday, January 11, 1864
Considerable better this morning but went to Doctor

Tueday, January 12, 1864
Read a letter with a Ring in it. Mailed a letter.
Made a Requisition for pr pants 1 shirt 2 pr socks

Wednesday, January 13, 1864
Raining all day Slightly

Thursday, January 14, 1864
On Picket on Lees Mill Road

Friday, January 15, 1864
The Dixie gals the Southners Pride
Graceful, Lovely and gay

Saturday, January 16, 1864
No entry

Sunday, January 17. 1864
No entry

Monday, January 18, 1864
A Small expedition Sailed This morning at 4 oc on the “Messasoit bound up Chowan River for Recruits to fill up some North Carolina Companys that are forming here
Refugees and Deserters are daily comeing in and swelling our Ranks here.
[first letters of lines are in black ink and remainder in red ink]
Tuesday, January 19, 1864
Felt like Shaking this evening but prevented it by taking a dose of quinine which made me Sicker.
The weather is clear and windy and not very warm.
Rebel “ Longstreet reported advancing on this place with 40 thousand men
I think he’ll stand a good chance of getting his street Shortened.
[lines alternate black and red ink]

Wednesday, January 20, 1864
Detailed at 10 oc to relieve the Veterans that were on duty that they might be mustered in and on returning to camp at 4 oc was informed that I with 13 others were to get ready with 3 days rations to march at 7 oc It is now 6. At 8 oc 175 men Embarked on the Massasoit. At 12 oc 20 men of (sic) landed 7 miles below Harrellsville tried to Capture a picket post of guerrillas failed

Thursday, January 21, 1864
At 4 oc the Ballance (sic) landed 4 ½ miles from town. Marched up to town and Captured 6 mule teams, 8 horses, 5 hogheads of sugar salt pork in profusion. Were fired on by the Guerrillas had 1 man killed 1 wounded Captured 1 Rebel wounded
Returned to Plymouth at 7 oc.

Friday, January 22, 1864
Another expedition left to day at 12 oc
Sold a captured pipe for 26 cts
Rambling around through town inspecting the Captured Stock and waggons
There was on(e) Beautiful 2 horse Carriage valued at $5000.
A grand Consort this evening 25 cts Brahms

Saturday, January 23, 1864
A Splendid day and night for picket. My turn for standing was from 2 till ½ past 4 as ever decided by casting lots.
It was a beautiful Moonlight night and
Nothing to break the Quiet but
Stealthy Tread of Otter and Mink
and the plunging of Muskrat
in the sluggish water of the stinking Swamps
Mixed with the gentle splashing of the Alligator.

Sunday, January 24, 1864
A lovely Sabbath Morning without a darkening cloud or rude breath of wind.
Our new Chaplin preached to day but I wasn’t here to hear him but understand He did not make a favorable impression on the soldiers. He is of the Episcapalion (sic) Church
The 15th & 16th Connecticut landed here this Evening to Relieve our Veterans.

Monday, January 25, 1864
Myself had a Chill this morning and Racking fever all day.
Did nothing but lay in bed all day and bear it and such a beautiful day warm, sunny and airy
An Expedition went off to day and showed with one prisoner.

Tuesday, January 26, 1864
Fell (sic) a little better to day in spite of Dose the Doctor gave me yesterday But am sorry he had no Quinine to give me today.
Another Expedition to day

Wednesday, January 27, 1864
Expedition of 22nd Returned this evening by land with about 100 head of sheep and poultry in proportion Captured near lake “Phelps.
Connecticut troops Relieve our Picket this morning

Thursday, January 28, 1864
“Camp Guard to day. Verry (sic) warm
“Countersign “Vicksburgh.

Friday, January 29, 1864
Good Music I hear just now by the Brass Brigade Band of the Connecticut troops here.
Grand Consort at the M.E. Church this Evening
At 9 0c got orders to get ready immediately with 2 days rations. 10 oc found 60 of Regt on Massasoit. Sailed at 11 up the Roanoke

Saturday, January 30, 1864
We land at 4 oc 6 miles above Hamilton 500 strong and 1 piece Marine artillary
Marched 8 miles and come upon 300 Rebs at Windsor and Route them completely taking 3 prisoners and Instruments of a Brass Band. Burn their Barracks and return to the Boat at 5 oc. Arrive at Plymouth at 9

Sunday, January 31, 1864
At Church this Evening Preaching by the Chaplin of the 101st

Monday, February 1, 1864
Down at the market post this morning. An Expedition at 2 oc
Amador County
Fiddletown PO
California.
Fayette PO
Fayette County
Iowa
Tuesday, February 2, 1864
Expedition of 70 men to Edenton
Start from here at 11 oc Return at 8
While there an Old woman told me to be carefull of my gun and not let her children get Shot with it as she did not want her children shot by a Yanke or a Yankees gun ugh

Wednesday, February 3, 1864
Monthly inspection
The 15th Connecticut leaves for Newbern Had a chill to day

Thursday, February 4, 1864
Another shake
18 Transports with Reenforcments (sic) for Newbern passed Roanole Island today

Friday, February 5, 1864
Still another shake was at the Doctor
Fighting reported continueing at Newbern
One Battery Captured by the Rebs and gunboat under water
Genrl Pickett in command of the Rebls (sic) forces

Saturday, February 6, 1864
At the doctors this morning
The troops at this place were all called out at 3 oc to watch the moon rising
Paid $15.00 to Harrison Pugh for a watch

Sunday, February 7, 1864
Was at the Doctor
Rec’d 2 letters from home Answer the same
Sent a Blue Back 5 dollar bill captured at Harrellsville Jan 21st `64

Monday, February 8, 1864
Clear windy and rather cool
Rebels Raise the siege at Newbern and Retreat towards Goldsboro. Reported to have been 15 thousand strong uner General Pickett and Ransom

Tuesday, February 9, 1864
On Provost Guard Clear and cool
two Rebel deserters came in to day. One from Stewarts Cavalry the other from the 11th NC
One man named Hughs in prison was conscripted paid 16.00 dollars for a substitute


Wednesday, February 10, 1864
Relieved of guard
Warm and pleasant weather
Dress parade every evening
No drill

Thursday, February 11, 1864
At Church this evening
Cooked a Chicken for supper

Friday, February 12, 1864
Sent for a pair of pant and a shirt

Saturday, February 13, 1864
Two companies of second Massachusetts heavy artillery landed here to Day to garrison the fort and let Veterans go home.

Sunday, February 14, 1864
At Church to day Preaching by Chaplain of 16th Connecticut
Again by Chaplain Billingly of 101st

Monday, February 15, 1864
Mailed a letter to SCR (presumed to be SC Roth)

Tuesday, February 16, 1864
On Camp guard post no 2.
Clear Cold and Windy

Wednesday, February 17, 1864
Relieved of guard
twas verry (sic) windy and verry cold last night
Countersign Lodi
Drawed clothing viz
1 pr Trowers 2.50
1 shirt 1.53
2 pr socks 32 per pr…64cts

Thursday, February 18, 1864
Pretty cold and windy
Commenced snowing finely about 9 oclock this evening

Friday, February 19, 1864
Sacra Mondue
Snow and freeze unto death. 2 inches deep and windy quantum sufficit
The sun shining Nevertheless

Saturday, February 20, 1864
28 Guerrillas were brought in this morning from Hyde County
41 negroes and 38 white Refugees came yesterday
Rect a package of papers from HWR (presumed to be HW Roth) Snow not going Detailed for carrying wood for kitchen

Sunday, February 21, 1864
Preaching to day by Rev Rowlings
Warm and snow disappearing
Detailed

Monday, February 22, 1864
Washingtons Birthday Celebrated by an address by Chap Billingsly of 101st
Music by the Band
Hail Columbia
Star Spangled Banner and the Doxology
Address at 6oc by the Rev Dickinson Chaplin 16 Conn Subject American Republic

Tuesday, February 23, 1864
Blank

Wednesday, February 24, 1864
Expedition up the Chowan [river] of 30 men on Genl Foster

Thursday, February 25, 1864
Expedition returned after capturing 1500 lbs tobacco and 2 negros (sic)
Shingles in the country are made of cyprus (sic) and juniper principally

Friday, February 26, 1864
Have a little Chill to day
A little chill is not such a little thing, either

Saturday, February 27, 1864
More Ague to day Received a letter from home. Tomorrow

Sunday, February 27, 1864
Inspection and whole regiment on picket with knapsacks included

Monday, February 28, 1864
Relieved of picket. Inspection and Mustered for 2 months pay and a miserable shake.

Tuesday, March 1, 1864
Shake again Went to the Doctor
An Expedition is ordered out with 2 days rations. Bumb Shell sent off up Chowan.

Wednesday, March 2, 1864
Shelling up the Chowan Rebels have a Battery on a bluff but are driven off and the Bumb Shell rescued by the Gunboats Southfield and Whitehead. At Doctors Got a Dose Worse


Thursday, March 3, 1864
Pretty well to day at again got some powders this morning
Warm pleasant day
Reports of Genrl Longstreet moving on Newbern

Friday, March 4, 1864
The 101st PV and 116 Connecticut were ordered away yesterday evening at 9 oc Destination supposed to be Newbern

Saturday, March 5, 1864
On Picket to day on Boyls Mill road Verry (sic) warm till 2 oc a heavy rain cooled the air and another shower at night made it cold and disagreable
Tying to fish in Welsh Creek

Sunday, March 6, 1864
Verry cold and cloudy and windy this morning
Countersign Snow Hill
At church by Rev Billingsly of the 101st

Monday, March 7, 1864
Warm again as usual to day
Great and exciting game of Ball in which Chaplain Rowlings figures conspicuously

Tuesday, March 8, 1864
A little rain this morning
Detailed for Provost Guard 30,000 Rebels reported moving on Norfolk

Wednesday, March 9, 1864
Relieved of Guard
fine morning A small mail came inon the Lancer last night

Thursday, March 10, 1864
Mailed a letter to sister
An Expedition on the Dollie last night a 9 oc Started to go up the Chowan for a Refugee but wind being high on the Sound the waves came near breaking over her, compelling her to Retreat for fear of drowning

Friday, March 11, 1864
Made a Gutta percha Ring


Saturday, March 12, 1864
Detailed for Picket but traded with H Pugh for Provost guard
Two refugee from Petersburgh are in the jail They give woefull account of affairs
Qoute [quote] Meal at 30 doll per bushel sometimes none to be had at that
Hotel meals 8 dollars
A small drink of Whiskey 2.50.


Sunday, March 13,1864
Relieved of guard. Dress parade at 5 oc Warm and verry pleasant

Monday, March 14, 1864
On Picket on Reserve post pleasant enough this morning gets cloudy and windy and cool towards night at 12 oc night begins to snow and blow but not freez it continues to snow till near morning
Drawed $2.00 sutler Check paid 30 [sutler was a person who followed the army and sold food, liquor etc to soldiers]

Tuesday, March 15, 1864
Several inches of snow fell last night but now at 12 0c it has almost disappeared by the influence of the Sun. Yesterday I Drawed 1 pr Pantaloons & 1 pr shoes.

Wednesday, March 16, 1864
This is a Blunder
To day I was relieved of picket and last night the snow fell etc
“Countersign Bachelors Creek
Recd 3 copies of the Lutheran

Thursday, March 17, 1864
On Picket to day again On post on Right of Acre Road
Very pleasant day and night
Colonel Maxwell officer of day

Friday, March 18, 1864
Relieved of Picket at 10 oc. Countersign “West point.
This evening the Veteran of 101st arrived from Roanoke Island
Talk of the Rebel Ram coming down the River to day

Saturday, March 19, 1864
Four escaped prisoners arrived here to day from Richmond. Were captured at Catletts Station last October. Were being conveyed from Richmond to Georgia Jumped out of the cars arrived after being 13 days in the swamp 2 were from N Jersy (sic) 2 from NYC
Detailed for loading Rations Draw Ham 2 next time


Sunday, March 20, 1864
Rain last night and cold and windy this morning
Had a chill this evening didn’t go on dress parade

Monday, March 21, 1864
Went to doctor this morning got 80 gr pow
A slight chill in the evening
Commenced snowing a little this morning about 8 oc Continued all day snowing and blowing

Tuesday, March 22, 1864
This is another error
Inspection as usual A Rain last night and cool this morning
Prisoners yesterday Reported 14 persons froze to death on Belle Island 2nd morning January. Snowed and(sic) all night and all day. At Doctors this morning

Wednesday, March 23, 1864
2 inches of snow pretty well friz this morning Commenced last night
went to Doctors this morning
Warmer to day and snow melting away
The 16th Connecticut arrived here again from Newbern

Thursday, March, 24, 1864
Feel pretty well this morning. Pretty hard freeze last night but the Remaining Snow is fast disappearing
An order for drill 2 hours a day from 10 am to 11, from 3 to 4 Batallion drill

Friday, March 25, 1864
Raining some today and cold
A Rebel was brought in to day that had been working on the Rebel Ram
An attack is expected

Saturday, March 26, 1864
On Provost guard
middling warm this morning but verry cool toward night
a Small Reconnoisance goes up the River on Massasoit and Returns and goes again

Sunday, March 27, 1864
This morning at 4 oc havenot Returned yet at 4 PM
Was at Church this evening Preaching by Chaplain of the 16th Conn Text 1st Peter 1st Chap latter part 12 verse

Monday, March 28, 1864
Drill at 10 oc to 11 AM and from 3 to 4 PM Dress parade from 5 to 6 Went at 8 oc to load wood get back just in time for drill

Tuesday, March 29, 1864
Commenced to Rain at 8 oc this morning
Recd 2 letter one from “Em one from S.C.R [Em may be his sister Emily]

Wednesday, March 30, 1864
On Provost Guard post no=4 Cold rain Paymaster “Major “Crane came in at 3 oc from Norfolk on the “Tug S.C Brooks.

Thursday, March 31, 1864
Relieved of guard The 101st PV is being paid to day They get The 100 dollars old bounty and 60 of the new with 3 months wages

Friday, April 1, 1864
A little wet and cool to day
company drill from 10 to 11 Brigade ordered ---? Day commencing at 2 oc
The 88 N.Y. is being paid to day None but Veterans get their pay.

Saturday, April 2, 1864
On Picket on the Right post on Acre Road A cold wet disagreeable day
Part of our Regiment were paid to day

Sunday, April 3, 1864
Relieved of Picket at 10 oc “Countersign “Calladale”
Recd a letter from “Em.

Monday, April 4, 1864
Mailed a letter for ‘E.E.L. [could be sister Emily Elisabeth Lepley]

Tuesday, April 5, 1864
Company E Veterans are paid Barrowed $1.00 from Milton Myers paid .50 for Butter 5 for Honey 10 for walnuts
Rather cold and unpleasant a little Rain

Wednesday, April 6, 1864
On Provost Guard Still cold and Cloudy and windy

Thursday, April 7, 1864
Relieved of guard On company drill from 10 to 11 Batallion Drill from 2 till 5 I escaped from it and had chill at 5 PM

Friday, April 8, 1864
Went to the “Doctor this morning have headache all day
Sold Watch to H.H. Pugh at $21.50
Recd a package of papers from H.W.R. Another chill at 8 oc

Saturday, April 9, 1864
Was at the Doctor this morning excused of duty
Recd a copy of the Missionary from Home Raining all day
paid Milton “Myers $1.00

Sunday, April 10, 1864
At the Doctor this morning Clear warm and pleasant
At Church at 10 a.m. by Chaplain 16th And at 2 P.M. by Rev Rowlings in the Brick Church The first service in it since we came here

Monday, April 11, 1864
Brigade Drill from 2 till 5 Fair and warm

Tuesday, April 12, 1864
Company drill A little rain in the afternoon.
Bought a watch from SB McCandlass for $13.00 Sold the same to James “Bracken at $13.50

Wednesday, April 13, 1864
Detailed for Police and Escaped drill Right warm and pleasant again

Thursday, April 14, 1864
Warm and pleasant Company and Brigade drill

Friday, April 15, 1864
A little Rain and no drill Buying and trading Watches

Saturday, April 16, 1864
On Camp guard. [a paragraph is crossed out]
Not on guard This [paragraph] is a mistake

Sunday, April 17, 1864
On Camp guard
The Rebels attack our pickets at 4 oc P.M. Two companies of Cavelry charge on the Rebels and are Repulsed with the loss of 2 men killed one missing 1 Lieut wounded.
Our Forts open on the Rebels at 6 oc PM and a Sharp shirmish takes place up at Warren neck.

Monday, April 18, 1864
All was quiet last night But the ball opens just at sunrise and continues to Roll until this time 9oc. A Captain of the 16 is wounded
Our Pickets hold their ground and firing is kept up all day on the line. The Rebels advance in force at 6 oc PM and drive our pickets in and open with artillery

Tuesday, April 19, 1864
The firing yesterday evening continued 2 hours. The Bonbshell and Whitehead are were sunk also
This morning the firing commenced at 3 oc and The Ram sinks the Southfield and chases the Miami off and fires on the town from below. The Rebles also captured Fort Wessle at daylight and are now firing on us from it We Build bomb proofs

Wednesday, April 20, 1864
Firing continued all night last night and the 101st Fort is Captured at daylight and the Rebels enter the town from both ends and we are surrounded and they have crossfire on us but we hold our works until 10 oc AM Wessel goes with a flag of truce and firing ceases for an hour and then commences but were forced to surrender about 11 oc AM.
The weather if fair. Sergent Logan killed and Corporal Bertner wounded.

Thursday, April 21, 1864
Fine morning and we are are(sic) living 1 mile from Town. The Rebels say they number 20,000 men in command of General Hoke
Started to March at 12 oc. Marched 15 miles and camped. 4 days ration were issued to us this morning, 32 hard tack 1 lb of pork

Friday, April 22, 1864
Williamston 13 minutes past 2 oc
started this morning at 6 oc
verry (sic) warm
Traveled about 12 miles to day Halted at 5 oc and are well treated
fine weather
Our guard is the 35 NC.

Saturday, April 23, 1864
Started at 6 oc Marched about 6 miles and Halted at Hamilton
distance 6 miles
{4 days Rations were issured to us this morning of our own Rations
32 hard tack and 1 lb of pork}this entry is crossed out and the word "not" writen over it

Sunday, April 24, 1864
Started 1/2 past 10 oc
Marched 10 miles
Camped in a wood
Our guard to day is the Alalcomb (?) [un readable word] and 17th NC
we are treated nice
A few drops of Rain

Monday, April 25, 1864
Fell in to line at 1/2 past 6. Arrived at Tau or, Taw, or Tar-bow at 12 M
Drawed Rations 1 pint of Meal and a little pork and peas for 2 men
Tuesday, April 26, 1864
The 88th were taken away at 10 oc without Rations The Rest of us are getting Rations "Ditto" Minus " pork
The 16th and part of the 101st left at 3 oc

Wednesday, April 27, 1864
No Rain yet verry (sic) warm
Drawed some Corn Meal and Onion 2 sides for 5 -6 men
a little salt
Have a Chill about 3 oc

Thursday, April 28, 1864
Sold a watch at $18.00
A sprinkle of Rain last night and to day
Took a dose of willow Tea this morning
Drew Rations
Meal, pork, peas salt

Friday, April 29, 1864
Fine morning and no rain yet
left Camp at 8 oc and Tarboro at 11 oc
Arrived at Goldsboro at at (sic) 5 oc distance60 miles
got some crackers and pork
Arrived Wilmington at 2 oc distance from Goldsboro 18 miles
Lot of cars at 6 oc crossed a river Cape fear River
There are 501 men in our train

Saturday, April 30, 1864
This morning at 7 oc Drawed soft bread about 3/4 of a lb
(can't read) and a small piece pork
left Wilmington at 12 oc Crossed The pee dee (?) Santee Rivers
distance from Wilmington to Charleston 205 miles

Sunday, May 1, 1864
arrived at Charleson at 7oc am left at 10 amrossed Savanah River at 6 oc and were in Georgia
Changed Cars at 3 miles (?E or S) of Savannah at 8 oc
from Charleston to Savannah 100 miles
Started for Americus by way of Macon
drawed Boiled pork an crackers
Rain this evening
Chill to day

Monday,May 2, 1864
Arrived at Macon at 12 oc from Savannah {?19 oc?} Arrived near Americus at Camp about 8 oc
Marched a few Rods from the cars and laid down for night

Tuesday, May 3, 1864
We are (?Counted?) of in messes of 90 men and an orderly sergent to draw rations and are marched 1 mile from road to camp with about 11000 more prisoners
drawe (sic) pork meal soap
Had a chill at 3 oc
We have Roll Call every morning at 8 oc [this last line is in ink, all the previous days are in pencil since his capture on the 20th]

Wednesday, May 4, 1864
It is very warm through the day and cold at night
Rations to day Ditto [this line is crossed out]
Rations for 1 man 1 day 1 quart of Meal and 1/4 lb of pork and a little salt
Confederate money is selling for 20 cts on the dollar in Greenbacks

Thursday, May 5, 1864
Rations of Meal and 3 spoonfulss (sic) of Molasses to a man and 1/4 lb of pork for 4 men
A squad of 25 or 30 men Escaped from prison last night through a tunnel and The Rebels have Hounds after them
Wrote a letter to Mother

Friday, May 6, 1864
Still verry warm
Ration of Meal 1 pt and 1/4 lb pork and 1 pt Rice for 4 men

Saturday, May 7, 1864
The Weather Remains the same
Rations of Baked corn 3 loaves to 4 men and Boiled pork 1/4 lb to 1 man
Three Rebel officers Ride through and inspect the camp

Sunday, May 8, 1864
A little warmer to day
Rations still smaller 2 loaves to 4 and a small piece of meat
The Three Officers Ride thrugh camp again to day
Rumors that Plymouth is Retaken

Monday, May 9, 1864
Had a chill and Fever to day about 3 oc
Eggs are selling at 10 dollars a Confederate or 2 dolls Greenbacks pr doz Bacon 5 confed or 1 Green Beans 2.00 per pot
Rations Do[ditto]
Tuesday, May 10, 1864
Still verry warm and sign of Rain
All kinds of Rumors are afloat about Exchanging Prisoners
Rations of Bread 66 loaves for 90 men
Rumors today that Fort Darling is ours

Wednesay, May 11, 1864
Another Chill today
Commenced Raining last night at 3 oc Rained Slightly all night and to day
Rebels say that "Lee Sold Richmond to Grant
Rather too cool for us this morning

Thursday, May 12, 1864
Went to the Doctor this morning but had no chill to day Got 4 little Black quinine pills
About one half of the prisoner got a little boiled rice today and a little less pork and bread instead
9 (8 crossed out) Prisoners Came in to [day] Captured at Dalton

Friday, May 13, 1864
At Doctors again this morning Cloudy and Cool A few more prisoners Come in to day
We get about 1 pt of Boiled Rice Mixed with pitch and a little less meat and Bread
Had a shake to day Was at the doctors

Saturday, May 14, 1864
A "Chill to day and high fever was at the Doctors
A few prisoners came in to day
Dalton reported surrounded by Genrl Thomas with 150000 men
The Rebellious Have a picnic in sight of Camp to day

Sunday, May 15, 1864
A Chill to day was at The doctor Weather of little more comfortable
A man with one leg was shot by the guard
Another tunnel was discovered to day
Rations of Vinegar issued to about 1/2 the prisoners

Monday, May 16, 1864
At the doctors again this morning feel pretty well No shake to day Rations as usual
Genrls Longstreet and Lee both reported wounded Mortally and Grant Moving closely on Richmond

Tuesday, May 17, 1864
Took 3 pills to day, feel better
Some prisoners were brought in to day They report Dalton in
our Possession with 4000 prisoners
They were captured on the 12th
They also report that a General Exchange of prisoners (have crossed out) has been agreed upon The weather still cool and cloudy
12 men that escaped last friday
night were brought in again to day

Wenesday, May 18, 1864
Am first rate to dayRations of Beans are issued to 1/2 the
camp to day
Our wounded are brought from Plymouth
and 12 more prisoners captured at
Dalton They report in our possession

Thursday, May 19, 1864
Fine day Everything quiet in camp
we get rations of Beans. Slop
The Macon Confederate of the 18th is
in camp They report no news from
Richmond since the 9. But that their army is being Victorious
in all points.

Friday, May 20, 1864
No News today
Dr E is digging a well. A(nd) is 15 feet to watter(sic)
Rations as usual plus a little soft soap

Saturday, May 21, 1864
A little excitement about Exchange
Reports of a General Order being issued by the Rebel authorities That all prisoners must be Exchanged or paroled (or crossed out) within 30 days.

Sunday, May 22, 1864
Three or four hundred more prisones were
brought in to day Some from Danville and some from
Meades Army captured on the 5th.
The Rebels are taking prisoners out to work at enlarging the Stockade.

Monday, May 23, 1864

very warm to day About 1000 prisoners were brought in today from Meades Army Captured at Mine Run on the 3rd and 6th

Tuesday, May 24, 1864
6 or 7 hundred more prisoners were brought in to day from Meades Army
Had a chill today at 3 oc
Wednesday, May 25, 1864
Had a shower of rain last night. Still very warm
About 1500 prisoners were brought in from Meades army
(on the 24th written between the lines) in which wer (sic) some of the 11th Reserves
And 7 or 800 more came in today.

Thursday, May 26, 1864
Had a Shake and severe fever Great excitement to day about paroling

Friday, May 27, 1864
Nothing unusual occurs to day Except that the Rebs are pretty badly
Scared and Examine The Stockade and a double guard on and line of
Battle formed on all sides having been Reinforced also giving us a Caution
against forcing the Stockade

Saturday, May 28, 1864
Had a severe Chill and fever. Took a dose of nine.
A few prisoners were brought in from Sherman's Army Captured 20 miles beyond Atlanta

Sunday, May 29, 1864
About 900 more prisoners were brought in to day from Meade's and Segels Army
Captured on the 14th/15th
Very fine day
Orderly got a letter from R R Bryson from Macon he reports that They have no
Shelter and not half enough to eat
Took some more Medicine

Monday, May 30, 1864
Another shake to day Very warm Took some more Medicine
About 900 more prisoners were brought in from Shermans and Butlers Army
The colonel Commanding this post says we will all be out
of this inside of 13 days

Tuesday, May 31, 1864
Fell (sic) pretty well no shakes Took some medicine
Reports that Atlanta is ours
The Macon papers claim continual victories for their armies

Wednesday, June 1, 1864
Had a Shake to day and Severe fever A Heavy rain to day about 12 oc

Thursday, June 2, 1864
A little more Ague & fever
Still take (fever crossed out) medicine
More Rain to day
8 or 9 hundred more prisoners came in to day

Friday, June 3, 1864
Escaped the Shake to day
Another Heavy Rain
4 or 5 hundred more prisoners were brought in to day

Saturday, June 4, 1864
Raining again this morning

Sunday, June 5, 1864
Raining all day and gave us a good cooling

Monday, June 6, 1864
Heavy Showers
Many Reports are going around in Camp of a speedy Parol (sic)of all prisoners on both sides

Tuesday, June 7, 1864
Verry Hot to day and looks like Rain
About 500 more prisoners were brought in from Grants Army and from Bell Island
They Report "Lee driven inside his fortifications (near crossed out) at Richmond

Wednesday, June 8, 1864
Another shower of Rain to day Nights are verry warm. Everything
is Dull in Camp no News Confederate Money is played out entirely in
Camp. Biscuit are selling at 50 cts a piece Onions 1.00 for largest Eggs 3 for 1.00
or 4.00 pr dozen

Thursday, June 9, 1864
A little rain to day and Cool and pleasant
Cheering News in camp this evening It is said (in) The Rebel papers that Atlanta
and Richmond are both in the hands of the Yankees.
It Causes a Rise spirits and great hopes of getting out of prison

Friday June 10, 1864
A Hot sun part of the day but verry Cool fresh breeze and looks like rain

Saturday, June 11, 1864
More Rain to day Had a chill and severe fever this afternoon eat no supper
Another excitement about paroling

Sunday, June 12, 1864
Cloudy and cool Fell (sic) pretty well Eat 2 biscuit for breakfast
News this morning that our officers are paroled and we are to follow

Monday, June 13, 1864
Cloudy all day the sun only got one peep at us and it is very cold with a mist
Have a tremendous Shake from 9 oc AM till 1oc PM
We have no Roll call

Tuesday, June 14, 1864
Still cloudy and cold with a light mist and no sunshine
Went to the Doctor This morning
New Potatoes in camp 1.00 pr qt Cucumbers 50 cts for 1 Beets Do Raddishes(sic) Do
Onions 1.00

Wednesday, June 15, 1864
Rain again to day
Was at Doctors Took 7 pills and Had a severe "Chill" Shake about 9 oc and pain with Bowels

Thursday, June 16, 1864
More Rain And about 2000 prisoners were brought in to A(nd)
Heard that Henry (his brother) was wounded Have a feve (sic) all day and no appetite all

Friday, June 17, 1864
The more Rain the more rest
was at the Doctors this morning. Fell (sic) better this morning
Got some Whiskey this evening

Saturday, June 18, 1864
Fell (sic) some better to day Was at the Doctor again
Have some Diarhea and Can't eat
Still very wet weather Cheering news from our Armies

Sunday, June 19, 1864
No better to day was at the doctor
Rain to day again 7 more men were shot to day by the guard

Monday, June 20, 1864
Feel pretty well was not at the Doctor
Rain Showers to day Blackberries and Apples for sale in camp Berries

Tuesday, June 21, 1864
Better this morning But verry slim

Wednesday, June 22, 1864
No rain to day Fell(sic) pretty well
Biscuit flour Onions are verry plenty and cheaper today
No news and things begin to look gloomy The Rebels find a tunnel completed


Thursday, June 23, 1864
Feel Better to day Washed a shirt and myself
About 200 more prisoners came in to day from Grants Army
They report him advancing on Petersburg

Friday, June 24, 1864
Took a dose of my Medicine this morning
A few more prisoners were brought in to day from Grants Army
Report Peterburgh in our possession Borrowed $10.00 of Weston Hall

Saturday, June 25, 1864
Verry warm but no rain
Great excitement about an exchange of prisoners to commence on the 7th July

Sunday, June 26, 1864
Feel a little Agueish to day Took some medicine
We have had no Roll Call for near week
47 Detachment went out for wood 18 men go evry(sic) day
to carry wood for 270 & is barely sufficient

Monday , June 27, 1864
Another hot day Feel better A few more prisoners were brought in to day that
were captured at Paines mills a month ago

Tuesday, June 28, 1864
Two fine showers of Rain

Wednesday, June 29, 1864
Cool and pleasant to day
Captain Wirs (?) Comanding Camp and quartermaster take the Raiders out of camp A Dead man is found buried near one of Their tents A jury of 12 Sargeants is taken out to try them.

Thursday, June 30, 1864
Captain Wirs issues an order for all men who had watches taken from them at Richmond to report at the Gate tomorrow evening to get them returned

Friday, July 1, 1864
An addition to the Stockade is finished to day and 49 detachments are taken out into it
A verry hot day I saw large new tomatoses (sic) in camp for sale to day
Great excitement again about an exchange Commencing of the 7th inst.

Saturday, July 2, 1864
Warmest day yet
Was over in the new stockade to see "Weber, Ellis & Kennedy
Reports in Camp that the guards say Richmond is in our hands and is (in) Peterburgh

Sunday, July 3, 1864
Had Roll Call this morning verry hot
no excitemnet here about the memorable (4 crossed out) Fourth of July
The paroled officers are Reported to be here to witness the Exhange which is to commence on the 7th

Monday, July 4, 1864
Warm and clear till toward (evening crossed out) noon and we had 2 fine showers
The Rebles are Reorganizing the Detachments in Camp The 44th(? 47th) is changed to the 96 Everything is quiet

Tueday, July 5, 1864
To day 13 thousand (line is crossed out)

Wednesday, July 6, 1864
blank page

Thursday, July 7, 1864
Have the Diarhea to(day) and feel bad
The Exchange passed off verry quietly too(sic) day. But the 16th is certain

Friday, July 8, 1864
Worse to Day

Saturday, July 9, 1864
Rain to day Very bad last night

Sunday, July 10, 1864
blank page

Monday, July 11, 1864
Six Raiders that were Sentenced to be Hung were Executed to day
Am Better

Tuesday, July 12, 1864
Am great deal better M Myers was taken to the Hospital
Verry warm
About 300 prisoners were brought in to day Grants Army
Reports that the parole Commences the 16th inst according our paper

Wednesday, July 13, 1864
Still some better Verry Hot day

Thursday, July 14, 1864
[blank page]

Friday, July 15, 1864
Verry warm This day and all quiet

Saturday, July 16, 1864
Not so well these days

Sunday, July 17, 1864
The Rebs fired 2 cannon as a signal for all troops to fall in in (sic) Readiness for any Emergency.

Monday, July, 18, 1864
Prisoners were brought in Captured 7 miles other side Atlanta

Tuesday, July 19, 1864
Reports in camp that “Shermans Cavalry is at Macon
Report also that Atlanta is in our possion (sic) and The Rebel “Johnson is Relieved of his Command

Wednesday, July 20, 1864
Great excitement about “Genrl Shermans Cavalry Coming to Release us
The “Rebels are fortyfying and Renforcing (sic) the guard
Heard a Sermon preached in Camp this evening. Preaching has been kept up for over a week

Thursday, July 21, 1864
The Rebs are Bringing woman and Children here from Atlanta and are hurying (sic) up works of defence around the Camp and Car loads of Soldiers are arriving to day
Am still no Better of Diarrhoaa (sic)

Friday, July 22, 1864
Several Hundred prisoners arrived to do (sic) from Grants army with no verry (sic) encouraging Reports
Middling Cool and pleasant

Saturday, July 23, 1864
The Old Story of a parole to commence on the 7th is Strongly Revived to day
Reports that the Commissioners of Exchange met at Wilmington on the 20th and agreed on a Parole of 3 months and then exchange This is the Coolest day since we have been in here Feel worse to day

Sunday, July 24, 1864
A Cool Breeze is going to day last night was Remarkably cool. Not so well to day

Monday, July 25, 1864
Very Cool and cloudy with a few showers
A man was Shot by the guard

Tuesday, July 26, 1864
Got some pills to Day am pretty Bad
Over a Hundred prisoners Came in from Grants Army
A large Tunnel was discovered to day 14 feet deep
Negroes are Employed to fill it up

Wednesday, July 27, 1864
No Better to day taking some more pills
Another man shot by the guard
The excitement about Parole is still kept up

Thursday, July 28, 1864
About 500 Prisoners were Brought in to day from Shermans army Captured within 1 mile of Atlanta
A shot was fired over Camp by the Rebs to prevent a Break being made by the prisoners

Friday, July 29, 1864
Several Hundred Prisoners Came in this morning
feel Better to day The sky is Cloudy and Threatning (sic) Rain Middling pleasant with a low breeze that arises eery (sic) morning about 9 oc or 10 oc

Saturday, July 30, 1864
I feel not better Diarrhoa bad
Reports that a Cavalry Raid is at Macon shelling the town
Great Excitement about Exchange
The Rebels are Building Forts and Mounting Guns

Sunday, July 31, 1864
Am worse to day
Cloudy all day and a Shower in the Evening
[on same page written in hand]
The 1st Aug
Col Winder and Capt “Wirs and a Minister visited the Camp
The Minister Red (sic) an extract from the NY (?) Herald that the Commisioners had met 3 times and it was hoped had agreed upon an Exchange

Monday, August 1, 8164
A little better to day Cloudy and Cool with a little Rain Nights pretty warm
Tuesday, August 2, 1864
Not so well today We had a heavy Shower of Rain this evening
The Sick are being taken out ot the rate of 4 to a Detachment Such as are not able to take care of themselves
Report say they are to be taken to our lines at Hilton Head to the Hospital
They are dying at Rate of 50 and 60 per day

Wednesday, August 3, 1864
Another Yankee was shot by the guard
Seven or eight hundred sick were taken out to day it said by some a train load was taken away
Verry (sic) Hot these days
Reported that Gen Stoneman was captured at Macon

Thursday, August 4, 1864
No sick were taken out to day
No Roll Call
A few prisoners were brought in Shermans Army

Friday, August 5, 1864
About 100 more prisoners were brought in from Shermans army They Report Atlanta surrendered
About 100 sick were taken out to day such are not able to walk
Feel worse do day

Saturday, August 6, 1864
A little Better to day
Another Yanke was shot today
No sick were taken out
A Macon paper stated that 2 train loads of Yankee sick passed though there

Sunday, August 7, 1864
Verry warm to day and I feel worse with Diarrhoea
The Exchange excitement has considerably abated and all is quiet

Monday, August 8, 1864
Warm and Cloudy and and (sic) Heavy Rain about 4 oc
The Exchange story is Revisited this morning
21 men were sent from Here for our lines
Three men were sent with Petition to our Government for our speedy Release.

Tuesday, August 9, 1864
A dew more Prisoners were brought in to day from Shermans Army none are arriving from Grants Army
Another Heavy Rain the Evening which caused about 40 Rods of the Stockade to fall and no little excitement among the Rebs
Am some Better
Wednesday, August 10, 1864
Another Heavy shower this Evening
Feel better to day
Macon papers in Camp to day state “General” Wessel has been Exchanged with our line officers and Great Hopes are had of our speedy Release.
Sick call to day I went to the Doctor for Diarhoa and sore mouth

Thursday and Friday, August 11 and 12, 1864 are blank

Saturday, August 13, 1864
The Excitement about Exchange is verry (sic) high
The Quartermast tells some are to leave here on Monday That the Exchange is going on as fast as possible

Sunday, August 14, 1864
Verry Hot and Heavy Rain is the Evening Rations are verry scarse in Camp
Pork selling from 20 to 30 ctc a Ration

Monday, August 15, 1864
Verry hot to day
Started to the Doctor but gave out and came Back
About 600 sick were taken out 1
It is [in?] the Herald and Phad. Inquirier that Genrl Wessle and the Rest of our field Officiers are Exchanges
Verry feeble to day
The most Beautiful Rain Bow I ever saw just at sun down

Tuesday, August 16, 1864
Clear this morning and very hot through the Day
Saw an Artist taking a Picture of the Camp on both sides of the Brook from Post No 17 at the lower side of the camp today. Verry warm in the afternoon
Our Rations tonight are ½ Ration cooked Beans ½ Ration corn Bread and 1 full Ration of Cooked Beef No news of importance

Wednesday, August 17, 1864
Clear this morning and very warm through the day and suffer considerably with heat these days There was about Thirty (30) Prisoners came in today from Different parts of the army. They bring no late news that can be considered reliable
Rations tonight 1 Ration cooked Beef ½ corn bread & ½ of very good cooked Beans

Thursday, August 18, 1864
Clear this morning as usual and about as warm through the Day as has been for some days back
Nothing strange or very important going on that I can hear of
The Cars have been running very busy for the last 48 hours
Probably they are laying in the next ten days Rations for us
Rations Cooked Beans ½ corn Bread ½ of Cooked Beef 1 Ration

Friday, August 19, 1864
Cloudy this morning but soon cleared off
The air grew very hot & sultry as the day advanced
We had a heavy shower of rain about dark & good prospect of putting in a wet night
Rations tonight 1Pint cooked beans ½ ration corn bread ¼ ration cooked Pork and ¼ ration cooked beef

Saturday, August 20, 1864
Foggy this morning the fog likted about 8 o clock A.M. and came down again about 11 o clock A.M. in th eshape of a heavy shower of rain
Wet and uncomfortable all afternoon Prospect of a wet damp night
At Dark One of our Co WW Davis Received a Letter from home this evening the first that has come [--?-] here
Rations ¼ cornbread ½ beans, ¼ cooked Beef and a smell of cooked Pork

Sunday, August 21, 1864
Cloudy and very foggy this morning The air feels Damp & cool and kept about the same all Day. There is no news in camp that can be sonsidered Reliable probably because there was no Prisoners came in today
One drew no Rations toight except about (?) ounces of corn bread half cooked that and water had to make our Supper

Monday, August 22, 1864
Foggy this morning and very damp but quite pleasant through the Day. We had to fast this morning till about 10 o clock & then we drew a double Rationof cooked Beef and Beans We drew ½ Ration corn Bread ½ cooked Beans and a pretty good Ration of cooked Beef in the evening.
No news of any kind that may be considered Reliable tonight.

Tuesday, August 23, 1864
It’s quite foggy this morning but warm Kept warm all day. There has [been] no late taken Prisoner came in and of course a stagnation in late news although all kinds of rumors are constantly afloat in the camp but They are not worth listening to.
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ corn Bread and 1 good Ration cooked Beef

Wednesday, August 24, 1864
Clear and pleasant this morning. Warm through the Day. Richard C Wick [Co E, 103rd PA Vols}Died last night at 9 O clock he has been ill for about a Month.
Abour 100 Prisoners came in today they report Kilpatrick out with the Cavalry on another Raid Where hs is going to is not known.
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ corn Bread and a small ration cooked beef

Thursday, August 25, 1864
Clear and very warm all Day There is no late news or strange ones either in Camp Nothing going on inside the camp except the Issuing of Rations to the Prisoners that takes up almost the entire Day now.
Our Rations this Evening is 5 spoonfuls Molasses ½ Ration Corn Bread and about ½ pint of Cooked Rice
Starvation indeed almost

Friday, August 26, 1864
The sun rose very clear this morning The Day was hot and sultry. There is no news of any kind afloat today. One of the so called Regulators while the Rations were being issued today struck a Man over the head Breaking his skull and killing him almost instantly.
Rations ½ corn bread ½ cooked Beans and 5 spoonfuls Molasses

Saturday, August 27, 1864
Clear and warm all Day. There is nothing special as yet going on that I can learn. Still a great deal of talk of Exchange but all talk to us so far I would like very well to see something doing but I am still content to wait longer.
Rations tonight ½ corn Bread ½ cooked Rice 1/3 raw Beef

Sunday, August 28, 1864
Clear this morning and very pleasant all Day the sun is not too hot or the air too cool to feel well
There is a great many stories going todayt about us being exchanged soon some of them appear to have come pretty strength [?strong] yet they may be false
Rations tonight ½ cooked Beans in forenoon
½ corn Bread in afternoon
1 Cooked Beef in afternoon
I guess that is all

Monday, August 29, 1864
Cloudy and very cool last night & this morning Kept cool all forenoon but changed and got warmer at noon very warm in afternoon
Soloman Moses Died last night about 8 Oclock of Dysentery
There is nothing new in Camp that I can hear of all old stories
Rations ½ Ration corn Bread
½ Ration Cooked Beans and a very little Pork

Tuesday, August 30, 1864
Clear and very warm all day There is still some talk of a speedy Exchange Some say that the Papers state that the Commisioners have met and agreed on a General Exhange of Prisoners on both sides but I do not know how it is all we can do is to wait and hope
Rations ½ cooked Beans ½ Beef in forenoon
½ corn Bread in afternoon 1 Ration cooked Beef at Dark
Wednesday, August 31, 1864
Cloudy this morning but soon cleared off and got quite warm was warm the remainder of the Day
We can hear nothing but talk of Exchange but so far there is more noise than Proof” [?]
We are getting very tired of this place our rations are so small at present
Rations ½ corn Bread !/2 cooked Beans 1 Ration cooked Beef & a little smell of Pork

Thursday, September 1, 1864
Clear this morning but pretty cold for this time of year The Musketoes are very bad at night they torment us so that one can hardly sleep A Serg’t of Detachment killed a man on the North side by stabbing him last evening
No late reliable news
Rations Cooked Rice & Beef in forenoon ½ each
½ Ration corn Bread in evening with some Pork

Friday, September 2, 1864
Very cool last night but clear this morning and very (sic) all Day
The Rebels took out some of the Colored Soldiers this evening it is said that they were formerly Slaves I do not know it (sic) that is true of not
This like everything else looks like Exchange to us
Rations tonight 1 Ration cooked Beef
½ Ration cooked Beans
½ Ration cooked corn Bread
This fills the page




This is the last daily entry in the Diary. Charles died September 11, 1864 of Dysentery. He is buried at Andersonville, grave # 8405


The pages for September 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th are missing.
The pages for September 7th, 8, and 9th and blank.







On pages for September 10th and 11th and for September 14th and 15th the following poem is written. Pages for 12th and 13th are blank. The ink is very faded and difficult to read:

When our country called for men we came from forge & store
From workshop, farm and factory our broken ranks to fill
We left our quiet happy homes & ones we loved so well
To vanquish all our Union foes or fall where others fell
Now in prison drere we languish & it is our constant cry
Oh ye who yet can save us will you leave us here to die?

The voice of slander tells you that our hearts were weak with fear
That all or nearly all of us were captured in the rear
The sores upon our bodies from musket ball & shell
The missing legs and shattered arms a truer tale will tell
We tried to do our duty in sight of God on high
Oh ye who yet can save us will ye leave us here to die?

There are heart the hope still beating in our pleasant northern homes
Waiting for the footsteps that may never never come
In southern prison pining meger pale and gaunt
Growing weaker weaker daily from pinching cold and want
There brother, sons and husbands pine and helpless captives lie
Oh, ye who yet can save us, will ye leave us here to Die?


From out our prison gate there’s a graveyard close at hand
Where lie 12 thousand Union men beneath the Georgia sand
Scores and scores are laid beside them as day succeeds to day
And thus it will be ever till all shall pass away.
And the last can say when dying with upturned & glazing eye,
Both love and faith are dead at home, they have left us here to die.



This is a slightly different version than was given to me by Cousin Eliza. Do you suppose he was able to send a copy out , perhaps written on those missing pages, or gave them to someone to take with them? This poem has apparently showed up in various prisoners writings and who knows who the original author was.


























































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