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RICHARD HUMPTON

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RICHARD HUMPTON

Roni Fraysier (View posts)
Posted: 951652800000
Classification: Biography
Surnames: HUMPTON
Biography RICHARD HUMPTON was a native of Yorkshire, England,
born in or about the year 1733. There is reason to believe he
belonged to a family which moved in a highly respectable
circle of society. - When he was quite a youth, a Captain
commission was purchased for him, in the British army; and
this commission he held for a number of years. He was for some
time stationed at Fort George, in the north of Scotland; and
he is said to have distinguished himself, in an attack which
the British made on Saint Malo, on the coast of France. He was
subsequently stationed in one of the British West India
Islands, -where he resigned his commission, and emigrated
thence to Pennsylvania. Here he fixed his residence on one of
the upper branches of the river Susquehanna. While there, the
rank which he had held in the English army became known, and
when the Revolutionary contest came on, a commission in
Continental service was offered to him, which he accepted. An
aged and highly intelligent gentleman (J.D.S.) informs the
compiler of this notice, that Judge Finney of Chester county,
(who served in the army throughout the Revolution, and in the
Indian war for some time afterward,) once told him when
casually speaking of Colonel Humpton, that he saw that
officerhorse shot under him, at the battle of Brandywine,
and saw the rider coolly ungird the saddle, sling it over his
shoulder, and proceed to place it on another horse. The same
aged and intelligent gentleman, above mentioned, further
states, that on one occasion he traveled with Col. Humpton
from Montgomery county to Philadelphia; that Humpton pointed
out to him, while passing through Germantown, the localities,
- and described the movements of the different bodies of
troops, when engaged in the battle, at that place. Humpton
also mentioned having had the command of a Brigade, on the
occasion, and showed the road by which he brought the troops
commit to his charge into action. The same respectable
authority just cited, gives the following account of incidents
in connection with the 'Paoli Massacre.'At the time of that
cruel affair, and for years afterward, the Paoli Tavern was
kept by a Mr. and Mrs. Robinson. The latter, - who was a very
respectable, intelligent woman, - gave a history of the events
connected with it, that had fallen under her personal
observation, at the time. - General Wayne and several of his
officers were regaling themselves in one of the parlors of the
tavern, known as Paoli.'- when the conviviality of the
party was suddenly checked by the arrival of Col. Humpton, -
who came from the camp, in full speed, and announced to them
his belief, that the camp was on the eve of being attacked by
the enemy. This they professed in disbelieve; when he
emphatically repeated his asseveration; told them from whence
he derived his information (a Scotch Highlander,) and urged
them, if they regarded their own safety, or that of their
troops, to break up their party forthwith. He then immediately
returned and took Mrs. Robinson, with him to act as a guide to
the American troops, in case of necessity; and Mrs. Robinson
did act as a guide to them. The informant of the compiler
says, this detail was received from such a source, that he
could not, and never did doubt its correctness; and he adds,
the facts were as thus stated, it is to be regretted that
Mr. IRVING, in his life of Washington, should have charged the
misfortune to the tardy movements of Colonel Humpton, the
second in command.'There is good evidence that General
Washington had full confidence in Colonel Humpton, and
employed him confidentially on various occasions; (see note *
at the end) and although a writer in the HISTORICAL MAGAZINE,
VOL. 3 p. 375. attempts to brand the Colonelmemory with
and disobedience of orders,'it is remarkable that
when the Society of the Cincinnati was formed - NEARLY SIX
YEARS AFTER THE PAOLI AFFAIR - we find in the list of
members'the name of 'RICHARD HUMPTON, COL. 2D
PENNA. REGT. between the names of two gallant Pennsylvanians,
viz. ANTHONY WAYNE BRIG'R GENERAL, and WILLIAM IRVINE BRIG'R
GENERAL; Is 'COWARDICE'a trait of character likely to be
snugly located between the names of such men as Wayne and
Irvine, in an honary document, at the close of a seven years'
war? CREDAT JUDAEUS. After the revolution, Colonel Humpton,
settled on a farm in Chester county, where he received (it is
believed from Governor Mifflin) the appointment of ADJUTENT
GENERAL of the Militia of Pennsylvania; which office he held
until his death, on the 21st of December, 1804. His remains
were interred in the Burying ground of the Friends'Meeting,
at Caln, where some of his brethren of the Cincinnati were
desirous of erecting a monument to his memory; but the
regulations of that religious society forbade the measure.
Colonel Humpton was a favorite friend of Governor Mifflin, and
particularly intimate with his Secretary, A.J. Dallas, Esq.,
Dr. Benjamin Rush, and other distinguished worthies of his
day. He left no family, and since the death of his widow, no
connection, or relative of his, is known on this side of the
Atlantic. [NOTAE CESTRIENSES]

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