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Ray Family History, Vols. II and III

Replies: 9

Re: Ray Family History, Vols. II and III

Posted: 1457490718000
Classification: Query
Ray's (Rhea) Of Haywood Co NC

.




Thomas Leander Ray b' abt 1727 (Ireland)
Spouse unknown
Children

Children
Thomas Lee Ray II


Thomas Lee Ray II
Sopuse Celia or Betsy Young

Children
Thomas Lee III b.1774
Joseph B. b. 1776
John b.1778 (maybe 1772)
Elizabeth Mary b.1780 never married had 3 children
W. Hiram b.1783
James (Big Jim) b. 1785
Soloman L. b. 1792




At each point along the way south there are other Rays living in the community. Apparently several of
the family were migrating together. There are no records to indicate when this Thomas died; there was no
settlement of his estate, and his name disappeared from county records about 1815, but not before
amassing large tracts of land in present day Yancey County. Thomas Ray Sr also had brothers John Henry
and William. John obtained land in Haywood County in 1799/1800 and William received a land grant in
1795 on Simpsons Creek.




John Henry Rhea/Ray b. abt. 1772 VA d. Dec.1859 Haywood Co. NC
On 1830 census John is between 60-70 years
old, Wife between 50-60 years old
John has 7 children and 2 slaves
John Came from Wilkes Co ( NC) ?

Spouse Sara Jacobs


FOR THE RECORD:

These records put a John RHEA or RAY on the land in 1795 and 1798 in Buncombe Co., NC., {Haywood Co., NC., formed from the Western Part of Buncombe County in 1808}.

John RAY, of the 1850 Haywood Co., NC., Federal Census was b ca 1772, in Virginia, and would have been of age - 23 years old - at the time of this North Carolina Land Grant for a John RHEA or RAY.

Thomas Leander Ray, Sr. was born 1727, Ireland, died 1815 Yancey County, N. C. 1771 in Virginia he married Cecila Arrington, born 1756, Virginia, died ? Yancey County.

Pennsylvania Archives, 5th Series, Vol. 1, page 15, enlisted July 19, 1746. For 3 years service # 3659, George Rogers, Clark's Illinois Regiment, and Virginia, Continental Line, # L 03659, 3 years service, given land, signed by Patrick Henry and Thomas Meriweather. Land Grant January 6, 1794, Cane River, Yancey County, North Carolina. First Family of Old Buncombe County, N. C. **

His son Thomas Leander Ray, Jr., born 1774, died 1843, Burnsville, Yancey County, N. C., buried Thomas L. Ray Cemetery, Yancey County, N. C., married 1790, Yancey County, N. C. Ivey "Betsy" Hensley, born 1775, Buncombe County, N. C., died Abt. 1818, Yancey County, N. C. She was the daughter of Hickman Hensley, born 4-15-1759, Albermarle County, Virginia, died 1816, Buncombe County, N. C., and Agnes Fisher, born 1760, Scott County, Virginia, died Abt. 1790, Buncombe County, N. C.

Hiram Ray born 1784, Yancey County, N. C., died 1840, Yancey County, N. C., wife Elizabeth Cox, born Abt. 1790, Yancey County, N. C., died, ?

Have a great Christmas and Happy New Year.
Lorraine Emory Lambert
lojolambert@sbcglobal.net

Note:
Annals Of Haywood Co. North carolina

About the time of the settlements on Crabtree, some bold hunters from what is now Caldwell County pushed across the mountains and shot deer, bears, and turkeys and fought the Indians on Panther and Twelve Mile creeks. There also they established temporary homes and went back for their families. Among these men, the names of David Russell, Hughey Rogers, and John Ray appear. Russell secured large grants on Twelve Mile creek in 1796. Rogers also opened up large boundaries in the same locality about the same time. John Penland who had bought lands on the West Fork of Pigeon a few years before also obtained grants on Twelve Mile creek. John Ray, a year or two before the settlements in that section were planted, came from Wilkes County and occupied a large grant on Panther creek. These four men, at one time, owned most of the land now included in Fines Creek township. Twelve Mile creek is now known as Fines creek.
These men all fought in the Revaloution.

ITEM: The East Carolina University's Joyner Library

http://media.lib.ecu.edu/govdoc/gis/county_display.cfm?id=45

Shows Haywood Co., North Carolina Locations:

Fines Creek: 353956N 0825634W

Laurel Branch Stream: 354025N 0830050W
Cove Creek Gap

Panther Creek: 353836N, etc.,


FOR THE RECORD:
North carlonia Archives: File #424

These records put a John RHEA or RAY on the land in 1795 and 1798 in Buncombe Co., NC., {Haywood Co., NC., formed from the Western Part of Buncombe County in 1808}.

John RAY, of the 1850 Haywood Co., NC., Federal Census was b ca 1772, in Virginia, and would have been of age - 23 years old - at the time of this North Carolina Land Grant for a John RHEA or RAY.






Note: 1830 census shows John with 7 children 2 slaves. His wife is born between 1770-1780
Children, 5 boys, 2 girls, 1840 census, only 3 in family, John, wife and 1 girl 10-15 years old (who is this girl?) (what are the names of the other two children of John?)
Also on the 1830 Haywood Co. census there is a Hananiah Ray the same age as John, Hananiah's wife is the same age as John's wife.
Is Ann Ray and Sarah Ray the childeren of Hananiah Ray?
Ann married Jacob Sitton
Sarah married John Henson



Children: Solomon b. 6 April 1811 m. Mary ( Polly) Ferguson
10 Mar. 1835
d. 24 June 1894

Mary b. 1813 m. Dempsey Hodge 22 Oct. 1832
Haywood Co. NC d. Blunt Co. TN
Robert b. abt 1815 Married Louisa Rhewhamer Green
William Madison b.12 Aug. 1823 d. 20 May 1908 Webster,
Jackson Co. NC Jackson Co. was made from
Haywood and Macon Co's
m.Jane Emily Noland 9 June 1847
m. Lucinda H. ? after 1880

Note: two boys and one girl missing from 1830 census


First Generation

1. John RHEA (RAY) was born in 1772 in Virginia. He appeared in the census in 1820 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1830 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He was a Farmer. He appeared in the census.

John RHEA (RAY) had the following children:

+2 i. Joseph H RHEA (RAY), born in 1803, Haywood County, North Carolina; married Elizure MURRAY, on 28 Nov 1841, Haywood County, North Carolina.
+3 ii. Solomon RHEA, born on 6 Apr 1811, Haywood County, North Carolina; married Mary Martha (Polly) FERGUSON, on 18 Mar 1835, Haywood County, North Carolina; died on 24 Jun 1894, Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina.
4 iii. Mary (Polly) RHEA (RAY) was born in 1813 in Haywood County, North Carolina.
+5 iv. Robert RHEA (RAY), born in 1815, Haywood County, North Carolina; married Rhewhamer GREEN, on 20 Dec 1834, Haywood County, North Carolina.
+6 v. Major William Madison RHEA, born on 12 Aug 1823, Haywood County, North Carolina; married Jane Emily NOLAND, on 9 Jun 1847, Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina; married Lucinda H, after 1880, Jackson County, North Carolina; died on 20 May 1908, Webster, Jackson, North Carolina.



Second Generation

2. Joseph H RHEA (RAY) (John-1) was born in 1803 in Haywood County, North Carolina.

Joseph H RHEA (RAY) and Elizure MURRAY were married on 28 Nov 1841 in Haywood County, North Carolina. Elizure MURRAY died before 1860 in Haywood County, North Carolina. She was born in Haywood County, North Carolina.


3. Solomon RHEA (John-1) was born on 6 Apr 1811 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1870 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina. He died on 24 Jun 1894 in Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina. Was interred in at Panther Creek Church Cemetery - Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina1

Solomon RHEA and Mary Martha (Polly) FERGUSON were married on 18 Mar 1835 in Haywood County, North Carolina. Mary Martha (Polly) FERGUSON was born on 13 May 1813 in Haywood County, North Carolina. She died on 18 Nov 1893 in Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina. Was interred in at Panther Creek Church Cemetery - Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina1 Solomon RHEA and Mary Martha (Polly) FERGUSON had the following children:

7 i. C RHEA was born in 1836 in Haywood County, North Carolina.
8 ii. Mary RHEA was born in 1837 in Haywood County, North Carolina.
+9 iii. John RHEA, born in 1842, Haywood County, North Carolina; married Martha, Haywood County, North Carolina; died before 1880.
10 iv. Laura RHEA was born in 1861 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.
11 v. James RHEA was born in 1863 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.
12 vi. William RHEA was born in 1869 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.

5. Robert RHEA (RAY) (John-1) was born in 1815 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Haywood County, North Carolina.

Robert RHEA (RAY) and Louisa Rhewhamer GREEN were married on 20 Dec 1834 in Haywood County, North Carolina. Rhewhamer GREEN was born in 1820 in Haywood County, North Carolina. Robert RHEA (RAY) and Rhewhamer GREEN had the following children:

13 i. Nancy Catherine RHEA (RAY) was born on 15 Feb 1836 in Haywood County, North Carolina.
14 ii. Solomon RHEA (RAY) was born in 1838 in Haywood County, North Carolina.
15 iii. M RHEA (RAY) was born in 1849 in Haywood County, North Carolina.

6. Major William Madison RHEA (John-1) was born on 12 Aug 1823 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1860 in Fines Creek community, Haywood, North Carolina. listed as Wm M Rhae He appeared in the census in 1870 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina. He appeared in the census in 1880 in Fines Creek community, Haywood, North Carolina. listed as W Madison Ray He appeared in the census in 1900 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. He died on 20 May 1908 in Webster, Jackson, North Carolina. He was a Farmer, Town Clerk. Was interred in at Webster Cemetery - Webster, Jackson, North Carolina2

Major William Madison RHEA and Jane Emily NOLAND were married on 9 Jun 1847 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina. Jane Emily NOLAND (daughter of William NOLAND and Sarah Elizabeth (Frances) RUSSELL) was born on 10 Dec 1829 in Fines Creek community, Haywood, North Carolina. She died on 21 Nov 1878 in Fines Creek community, Haywood, North Carolina. Was interred in at Penland Cemetery Fines Creek, Haywood, North Carolina moved to Arkansas Major William Madison RHEA and Jane Emily NOLAND had the following children:

16 i. Sarah J RHEA was born in 1848 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.
17 ii. Jefferson James RHEA was born in 1862 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.
18 iii. Thomas Zebulon RHEA was born in 1867 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina.
+19 iv. Samuel M RHEA, born on 5 Aug 1871, Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina; married Mary E, in 1899; died on 2 Feb 1937, Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina.
20 v. Laura Avone RHEA was born on 20 May 1878 in Waynesville, Haywood, North Carolina. She died on 18 Aug 1878 in Waynesville, Haywood, North Carolina. Was interred in at Green Hill Cemetery - Waynesville, Haywood, North Carolina4

Major William Madison RHEA and Lucinda where married after 1880 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Lucinda H was born on 11 Nov 1840 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She died on 3 Jul 1898 in Webster, Jackson, North Carolina. Was interred in at Webster Cemetery - Webster, Jackson, North Carolina



Third Generation

9. John RHEA (Solomon-2, John-1) was born in 1842 in Haywood County, North Carolina. He died before 1880.

John RHEA and Martha were married in Haywood County, North Carolina. Martha was born in 1838 in North Carolina. John RHEA and Martha had the following children:

21 i. John T RHEA was born on 22 Mar 1863 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina. He died on 16 Mar 1924 in Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina. Was interred in at Panther Creek Church Cemetery - Panther Creek, Haywood, North Carolina1

19. Samuel M RHEA (William Madison-2, John-1) was born on 5 Aug 1871 in Crabtree, Haywood, North Carolina. He died on 2 Feb 1937 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. Was interred in at Keener Cemetery - Sylva, Jackson, North Carolina5

Samuel M RHEA and Mary E were married in 1899. Mary E was born on 19 Apr 1878 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. She died on 3 Apr 1966 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. Was interred in at Keener Cemetery - Sylva, Jackson, North Carolina5 Samuel M RHEA and Mary E had the following children:

22 i. Helen RHEA was born on 14 Jan 1913 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. She died on 16 Jan 1930 in Sylva Township, Jackson, North Carolina. Was interred in at Keener Cemetery - Sylva, Jackson, North Carolina5

Sources

1. Joseph Michael Miller, William Rowan Miller, compiler, Cemeteries & Family Graveyards in Haywood County, North Carolina (Waynesville, North Carolina: George A Miller Sr, 1979), p 128.
2. Jackson County Genealogical Society, compiler, Cemeteries of Jackson County, North Carolina (Cullowhee, North Carolina: Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc, 1998), p 393.
3. , Cemeteries & Family Graveyards in Haywood County, North Carolina, p 130.
4. Ibid., p 67.
5. , Cemeteries of Jackson County, North Carolina, p 208.

From "THE EARLY HISTORY OF HAYWOOD COUNTYN.C.
William M. Rhea came to this county in the early part of the 19th century and settled on Fines Creek. He took an active part in the old muster militia organization in this county. He served with distinction in the Confed service attaining to the rank of Major. Major Rhea lived near the old Pendland place (middle Fines Creek) where he obtained some good land at much less than a dollar an acre about the time of the Civil War. Rhea also took an active part in politics and was elected Clerk of the Court before the war. He was also an active Deputy Sheriff of the county for awhile.



William Madison Rhea, b.Aug. 12, 1823, N.C. believe he was a Maj. in
Civil war. d. May 20,1908 in Jackson Co. N.C.
m . June 15,1847, Jane Emily Noland, b.Dec.10, 1829, Haywood Co. N.C. d.
Nov.21,1876 Haywood, Co. N.C.
Children: Sarah Jane Rhea,May 14,1848;d.Feb.10,1907;m.Geo.N.Rogers
Nov.25,1866
2. Laura Avaline Rhea,May 25,1851, d.Aug 20,1858
3.Helen Josephine Rhea b.July23,1854, d.Feb.19 1856
4.William P. Rhea July 14,1856
5.James Vance Rhea Jan.30,1860
6.Jefferson Hardy Rhea May 4.1861 m Ura 1896
7.Thomas Zebulon Rhea
b. May4,1866; d.Feb.7,1937;m. Georgia Lora, 1891
8. Samuel Madison Rhea, b.Aug.5, 1871; m.Mary Etta Hill, Aug.5,1899

State of North Carolina--Haywood County. Court of Pleas and
Quarter Session, December Term 1859.
Solomon Rhea, and D. V. McCracken, administrators of John Rhea,
dec'd, vs. Robert Rhea, et. al.--
Petition to sell a slave. It appearing to the satisfaction
of the Court that Robert Rhea and the heirs of Mary Hodges
are non-residents of the State of North Carolina. It is
therefore ordered by Court, that publication is made in the
Franklin Observer for six succesive weeks, commanding said
non-residents to be and appear at the next term of this
Court to be held ** the county of Haywood at the Court House
in Waynesville, on the 4th Monday in March next, then and
there to plead, answer or demur to said petition, or the
same will be heard ex parte ** to them. Witness, W. W.
Medford, Clerk of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, at office, the
4th Monday in December, 1859. Certified this 12th Jan.
1860. W. W. Medford, clerk Jan. 27





Robert Ray/Rhea b. abt 1814 NC d. after 1860 m.20 Dec. 1834
Ray, Robt., Lamar Co., age 46, born @ 1814, in NC,
!860 Census Males Born 1811-1847
Eligible for Military Service Larmar and Fannin Co TX
occp. Farmer, Pct. 8, Dwl#176/192, worth 0/100

Spouse: Rhewhamer Green b. abt 1819 NC Daughter 0f William
and Catherine Green

Note: What happened to Robert Ray ? Bible records show Rhewhamer marries
John Neff 21 January 1862

Children: Nancy Catherine b. abt 1836 NC m. Patton messer
m. 25 Dec. 1853 Haywood Co. NC
Solomon b. abt 1838/39 NC m. Nancy Wilkerson,
Mary Ann (Sissy) Wilkerson m. 23 Feb. 1871
M. (female) b. abt 1851 NC

Solomon Ray/Rhea

Spouse: Nancy Wilkerson

Children: Climemtine b. abt 1864 TX d. abt 1870

Spouse: Mary Ann Wilkerson

Children: Asa b. 7 Feb. 1872 Webbers Falls, OK d. 31 Jan. 1923
Nancy Bell b. 1875 m. Hugh A. Shoemake

Asa Ray m. 20 Oct. 1890 Sallisaw, OK

Spouse: Mattie George White b. 15 Sept.1877 TN (daughter Of
George White and Frances Tilman (Pilman ?)
d. 3 feb. 1940 Tulare Co. Hospital
buried at Delano, CA

Notes:

This line ties into the Wilkerson line in Emmet Starr’s History of the Cherokee Indians..
It has taken a long time and the help of a lot of people to trace Solomon Ray to his ancestors.
Solomon Ray, Patton Messer, McAnnally (Mack) Messer, John Groom, Isaac Neff with two brothers
and George Wilkerson were all in the 22nd Texas cavalry, 1st Indian Regiment. Enlisted at Ft Washita, TX


Patton Messer is the brother of James McAnnally Messer.
Patton married Catherine Rhea/Ray sister of Solomon Rhea/ Ray.
James McAnnally Messer married Elizabeth Wilkerson, sister in-law Of Solomon Rhea/Ray,
Catherine Rhea and Patton Messer.
Isaac Neff is a brother in-law to all, he married Mary Wilkerson.



The Enterprise Mountaineer, September 21, 2001
Community named for big cat
Panther Creek's history now part of mountain lore

Editor's note: Much of this story comes from a brief history of Panther Creek written
by Charles C. MESSER, a native of that area and retired chief deputy of the Haywood County Sheriff's Office. MESSER told the history to Al AMBROSE, who wrote and submitted it to The Enterprise Mountaineer. Additional information was provided and written by Kathy N. ROSS.

In the early 1800's there was a small post office at the lower end of the Beasley Cove in what is now the Panther Creek community. This is just off the Earl Bradley Road. Along with the post office, there stood a store, a blacksmith's shop and a one-room schoolhouse made of logs. This little community then went by the name of "Paint".
The postmaster for Paint was Bascomb BEASLEY. Nearby lived Tood NOLAND and his family.
Dave MESSER also lived in the Paint Community. He was a son of Revolutionary War veteran Christian MESSER, who settled in that area after the war and who is buried in a family cemetery below Panther Creek Road, on a knoll not far from the Pigeon River.
MESSER owned lots of land and had 10 children to work it. Most of his time was spent in the woods hunting deer, bear and turkey. It was on such an outing that MESSER stopped at a creek for a drink of cold water. As he raised from his drink, he saw a large black panther standing in a chestnut tree. As the big cat was above him, MESSER shot the panther with his muzzle-loading rifle. The panther fell into the creek, dead. The local people called the stream Panther Creek from that time on.
About a year after the panther incident, Tood NOLAND, MESSER and some of the older people decided the community needed some boundary lines and set about laying them out. The boundaries started on the east side of the Pigeon River, near the mouth of Jonathan's Creek. They went up the watershed to the east of Sol RAY Gap. Then the boundary went across the top of Little Pine Mountain and over to Poke White Gap. It continued to the top of the Cedar Cliff (now known by many as FERGUSON’S Mountain), east to the Gillet Gap (near where MESSER killed the panther) and northeast to Lize Gap. The boundary turned north to the top of Oaks Knob and then west along the watershed to Jim RUSSELL Gap. The boundary ended at a point southeast of where Fines Creek enters the Pigeon River.
NOLAND stood up in the boundary meeting and said, "Let's call our community "Panther Creek" in honor of the black panther that uncle Dave MESSER killed up at the head of the creek."
Everyone agreed, and corn whiskey was poured into a cup. The cup was passed around, and everyone took a sip from the cup. Tood NOLAND exclaimed, "From this day forward, our community shall be known as "Panther Creek."
Things have changed since that day. The little schoolhouse, which was still standing in the 1920's, is gone. All of the community elders are gone. The first church, with its hand hewn beams, is gone. Dave MESSER swapped his land from Wilken's Creek to Hurricane Creek to a man named "FISHER" for a .32-caliber homemade hog rifle. The land ended up being sold for back taxes. A silver manganese mine operated on the swapped land. That silver manganese was smelted into bullets, which were lighter than lead. Now the mine is gone as well.
But the legends remain, including those of the Granny Rhea Rock, also located in Panther Creek.
The ledge overlooking the Pigeon River was a home away from home for Polly RHEA, an eccentric but also apparently warm-hearted contemporary of Dave MESSER. Polly RHEA grew up near Rush Fork, the daughter of Robin FERGUSON, the ancestor of most of the county's FERGUSONS. She married Solomon RHEA and moved to Panther Creek.
'Polly RHEA would take mad spells," said her great-great-grandson, Carlyle DAVIS, in a 1991 interview.
"And when she did, she would go down to that rock and spin."
The RHEAS had five slaves, three men and two women, and the men slaves would have to take her spinning wheel" down to the rock,” recalled DAVIS, who is now deceased. "One of the women slaves was named Prissy, and she would have to carry her food and go tend to her.
'When she got on good terms again, the men would go get the spinning wheel, and she would go home."
During the days of the Cherokees’ forced removal on the Trail of Tears, Cherokee refugees hid at the RHEA house. When the family feared trouble, the Cherokee would be sent to the Granny RHEA Rock to hide and sleep. Almost 30 years later, during the Civil War, the rock was used to hide horses, meat and valuables from Union raiders. Granny RHEA continued her spinning spells at the rock, in those later years spinning cloth for Confederate soldiers.
Solomon RHEA gave his name to a nearby pass in the mountains, known as the Sol RAY. (In later generations, many descendants of the RHEAS changed the spelling of their name, and that later spelling stuck.)
As for the old Paint post office, it became part of the Route 1, Crabtree route run by Coleman FRANCIS in the early 1900's.
Many older generations and natives of Panther Creek still pronounce their home in old mountain dialect, spoken as "Painter Creek." And while it may be coincidence that the original name of the area was Paint, it is only coincidence, said Ralph MESSER, Charles MESSER’S brother. For "painter" is simply an old-English pronunciation of "panther," dating back to the 1600's.


Granny Ray was Mary "Polly" Ferguson, [born 1812] wife of Solomon Ray [born 1811] in NC and married on March 18, 1835.
Solomon RAY and Mary FERGUSON, daughter of William, married March 18, 1835 in Haywood County, NC in the presence of
S. FITZGERRALD. County Court Clerk. The bondsmen for the marriage were Solomon RAY and Alexander Henry.
Solomon RAY was the son of John Ray, and brother to Robert.

:

Notes:



PATTON M. MESSER, b. September 01, 1830, Haywood County, NC; d. January 20, 1923, Morrison, Noble County, OK; m. NANCY CATHERINE RHEA, December 25, 1853, Haywood County, NC; b. February 15, 1836, NC; d. March 05, 1919, Morrison, Noble County, OK.
JAMES MACANALLY MESSER, b. February 1842, NC; d. 1922, Stilwell, Adair County, OK; m. (1) ELIZABETH "BETTIE" A. WILKERSON, September 11, 1864, Fannin County, TX; b. Abt. 1845; m. (2) NANCY ALBERTY, Aft. 1870; b. January 1853.

John Neff, married Rhewhama Rhea/Ray

Note: If this Rhewhamer is the mother of Solomon Ray then Rhewhamer would be abt 18 years older then John.


(Neff family lore has Rhewhamer marring John Neff Jr. 18 year her junior abt 1861, TX)
(I think it is possible that the John Neff that married Rhewhamer could have been a 2nd marriage for
John Neff Sr.)
It is also possible that the farm that John Sr. bought was sold by John Jr.(two years after it was purchased by
John Sr.

North Texas Regiments
22nd Regiment Texas Cavalry:
At Ft. Washita, the 22nd Regiment Texas Cavalry: “was organized January 16, 1862, and reorganized June 30, 1862, with ten companies, A to K. It appears to have been reduced to a battalion of six companies A to F, some time after February 29, 1864. The organization was known at various times as the 1st Indian Regiment Texas Cavalry, Merricks’s Regiment Texas Dismounted Cavalry, Taylor’s Regiment Texas Cavalry, Taylor’s Regiment Texas Mounted Rifles, Steven’s Regiment Texas Cavalry, Stone’s Battalion Texas Cavalry and Merrick’s Battalion Texas Infantry or dismounted Cavalry.” Source: National Archives

Source:

Confederate Records
U.S. Census
Annals of Haywood CO. NC
History Of The Cherokee Indians
The Enterprise Mountaineer


Source:
Oklahoma court records

10. APPEAL AND ERROR — Remarks of Trial Judge — Reversal. Record examined, and held, remarks of trial judge were not such as to authorize a reversal of this judgment.
Appeal from District Court, Haskell County; W.H. Brown, Judge.
Bob Hisaw was convicted of murder and sentenced to imprisonment for life, and appeals. Affirmed.
On the 13th of February, 1912, Virgil (commonly called Rex) Ray and his wife, Lizzie Ray, who had been married about a month previous to that date, separated. They had been living in a little one-room log house in the Hisaw neighborhood of Haskell county. Rex Ray was a tenant farmer, and prior to his marriage and up to the time of said separation had off and on worked for the defendant Bob Hisaw; the defendant being a farmer and stock raiser of that neighborhood. On the afternoon of February 13, 1912, Rex Ray and his wife and her father, Dick Odom, hauled what little household goods the Rays had up to old man Dick Odom's place. It was there that Rex Ray and his wife finally parted — Rex leaving there with a man by the name of Dink Dukes, another farm hand who had been working in that neighborhood, and when they left they said they were going across the river; this community being in the neighborhood of both the Canadian and Arkansas rivers near the junction of them. The general public never saw Rex Ray alive after dark of February 13, 1912. He was missed from that community. Along in April or May of that year it became rumored that Rex Ray had been killed and his body buried. On
Page 487
the 28th day of June, 1912, Dink Dukes appeared in Stigler, the county seat of Haskell county, and informed the officers that Rex Ray had been killed on the night of February 13, 1912, and his body buried near the Arkansas river in what was known as the Hisaw bottoms, and that Bob Hisaw had shot and killed Rex Ray while he was asleep in bed at the home of one Rile Odom, a brother of Ray's wife, and that Bill Hisaw came with Bob Hisaw when the killing occurred. Dink Dukes also stated that he could go with the officers and find the place where Rex Ray's body had been buried. A complaint charging Bob Hisaw and Bill Hisaw with the murder of Rex Ray was immediately filed by the county attorney of Haskell county, and warrants issued for their arrest. The officers carried these warrants with them when they went down with Dink Dukes to disinter Ray's body. On their way they stopped at the home of Bob Hisaw, but could not find either him or Bill. There had been a picnic in Stigler on that day, which Bill Hisaw had attended. As soon as he heard that Dink Dukes had disclosed that Rex Ray had been murdered, and that the officers had gone to the scene to search for the body, he got a horse and immediately rode to Bob Hisaw's house, where he had been staying. The officers disinterred Ray's body, and found it wrapped in a blanket and quilt, dressed in a dark coat, an old blue shirt, either one or two pairs of trousers, and one pair of overalls. The flesh was partially decomposed, but a bullet hole was discovered in the head near the nose. These parties did not make a thorough investigation of the body because of its badly decomposed condition. The officers returned to Stigler, and thereupon Rile Odom and his wife, Mary Odom, were arrested in connection with Dink Dukes as being implicated in the
Page 488
murder. About a week or ten days later Bill Hisaw came to Stigler and gave himself up. A month or two thereafter he was tried for the murder and acquitted. Bob Hisaw was not arrested until about October, 1914, when he was captured in McCurtain county, Okla., on a farm about ten miles from the town of Valiant. He was at that time going under the name of R.A. Johnson. The trial of Bob Hisaw took place in December, 1914. Bill Hisaw, Rile Odom, Mary Odom, his wife, Emma Hisaw nee Odom, Lizzie Ray, nee Odom, the widow of Rex Ray, and the old lady Odom, the mother, were all witnesses for the prosecution, and testified to a state of facts substantially as follows:
That Rex Ray separated from Lizzie Ray on the 13th of February, 1912, at old man Dick Odom's house, and left traveling afoot with one Dink Dukes. That he was dressed at that time in a dark coat, an old blue shirt, and a pair of overalls over a couple of pairs of trousers, and was wearing ordinary work shoes. Rile Odom says that he was at his father's house that day and learned of the separation of Rex Ray from his (Odom's) sister, and that along in the afternoon he started home riding horseback. That on his way home he overtook Rex Ray and Dink Dukes, and that they told him they were leaving the country, and were going across the river if they could find some place to ford that night. Odom says that he told them if they couldn't get across the river that night to come and stay all night at his house and wait until next morning and go across. That he separated from them near the Hisaw store and postoffice, their intention being to ford the river, and his to return home. He says that about an hour, or near that time, after he returned home, Rex Ray and Dink Dukes appeared at his house, stating that they could
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not find a way to ford the river that night. That Odom lived in a small two-room log house not far from the west bank of the Arkansas river. That they all went to bed in one room; Rex Ray and Dink Dukes and Rile Odom sleeping in one bed, Rile's wife, Mary, and her two children sleeping on another bed, and Emma Odom sleeping on a pallet close to these beds. They state: That about 12 o'clock that night somebody came to the front of their house and halloed, "Hello!" That Rile Odom lighted a lamp and opened the door. That Bob Hisaw and Bill Hisaw came into the room. That as soon as he came in Bob stated, "There is going to be hell here in a few minutes." Rile says that he told Bob that he didn't want any hell there that night. That Bob immediately walked over to the bed in which Dink Dukes and Rex Ray were lying, turned the covers back, and with the remark to Rex Ray, "Wake up, old boy!" commenced to shoot him in the breast with loads from a pistol. That Bob Hisaw shot Rex Ray five times in the breast, and then stepped back from the bed toward the fireplace, remarking in substance, "Now, I guess you will burn my barn, and poison my horses, and sneak up behind me and cut my throat, and take me away from my little children," to which Rex Ray is alleged to have replied, "No, no, Bob," whereupon Bob said, "Well, I guess you need another," and reloaded his pistol, stepped back to the bed, and fired another load into Ray's head. The witnesses then say that Bob turned around to each of them with his drawn pistol, stating that if they said anything about it they would go the same way. That he then directed Dink Dukes and Bill Hisaw and Rile Odom to help him put Ray's clothes on, which was done, and the body wrapped in a blanket and quilt, carried out and placed on a horse which Bob Hisaw led and Dink Dukes
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rode, holding the body in front of him across the horse, and Bill Hisaw walked beside the horse out to a field about 200 or 300 yards from Rile Odom's house, where the body was thrown into a gap and covered up with brush. Just when and by whom the body was buried does not appear from the record. Rile Odom did not accompany the parties away from the house. Some time after these parties left with the body of Rex Ray they again appeared at Rile Odom's house and washed their hands, stood around and talked, and finally Bill Hisaw and Bob Hisaw and Dink Dukes left. The next morning Rile Odom and his wife and children and Emma Odom all went up to old man Dick Odom's house. They stayed around there two or three days, and afterwards moved to a little house on Bob Hisaw's place, about a quarter of a mile from where he lived, and were still living there at the time of their arrest on the 28th day of June, 1912. Dink Dukes stayed around in that neighborhood for a while, and then disappeared. Bill Hisaw stayed on the farm there with Bob up until the day that Ray's remains were disinterred. Bob Hisaw also stayed there until that time. Old man Odom and his wife and Lizzie Ray testify that on the night of the 13th of February, 1912, Bob Hisaw and Bill Hisaw came to their house; that Bob asked if Rex Ray was there, and was told that he had left that evening; that Bob was drinking, and had some whisky with him, and offered them a drink of whisky, and then left. This was about an hour before he is said to have appeared at Rile Odom's house. Dick Odom and Rile Odom lived about four miles apart. There is some evidence in the record to the effect that Bob Hisaw and Rex Ray had had some trouble over a hog which either Bob had lost or it had been stolen, and there is evidence to the
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effect that Rex Ray had made threats against Bob Hisaw just a short time before the homicide to the effect that there would be trouble between him and Bob if Bob came over to Rile Odom's to a dance that Rile intended to have, and danced with his (Rex Ray's) wife. It appears that Bob Hisaw and Rex's wife had been neighbors and friends ever since they were boys and girls together. There is also some evidence to the effect that Rex Ray had been married previous to his marriage to Lizzie Odom, and that his first wife had died mysteriously, and that Rex Ray was tried for killing her. This evidence, we presume, was admitted for the purpose of indicating that Lizzie Ray was afraid that Rex would kill her, and that she instigated her brothers and his friends to kill Rex and bury him. On the other hand, the theory of the state is that there was hard feeling between Bob Hisaw and Rex Ray, and that Rex had indicated that he intended to do Bob some injury, both to his person and his property, and that Bob was infuriated thereby, and on this occasion was drinking, and concluded he would put Rex out of the way in order to prevent any future trouble. The jury adopted the latter theory of the killing, and there is ample evidence in the record to support the conviction.
The defense relied upon was an alibi, Bob Hisaw testifying that he was at home from a little after dark on the evening of the 13th of February, 1912, all the balance of the night, and that he sat up with a sick child of his until after midnight, and that his wife and Hiram Thomas and Jeff Rainwater, his cousin, and Idus George were all at his house that night sitting up with the sick child. He is corroborated by all of these witnesses, who were shown to be either relatives or very intimate friends of his, at
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whose places and with whom he counseled and conversed during the time he was scouting from the 28th day of June, 1912, up until October, 1914. Bob explains the fact that he went on the scout by stating that he had heard that the Odoms were going to testify that he killed Rex Ray, and that he did not know just when they would say it was done, and ran off until he could find out what their testimony would be. It appears, however, that after Bill Hisaw was tried and acquitted and the testimony of all these state witnesses became public, even after that time Bob returned to near the scene of the homicide and counseled and advised with those people who afterwards corroborated him in his alleged alibi. This was either late in the year 1912 or early in the year 1913, and yet after all that happened Bob again went on the scout and stayed for a period of over a year, and never did surrender himself to the officers.
A.L. Beckett, R.C. Roland, and E.O. Clark, for plaintiff in error.
S.P. Freeling, Atty. Gen., and R. McMillan, Asst. Atty. Gen., for the State.
MATSON, J. (after stating the facts as above). The regularly elected county attorney

This killing, according to the testimony of the state's witnesses, was as cold blooded, cruel, and malicious as any of which we have read. If there ever was a case deserving
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of the death penalty this is one. A defenseless man shot in the bed while asleep without warning, without opportunity to defend himself, or even to say good-bye, and then the defendant, after shooting him five times, and after reloading his pistol, returned to the bed because he was still alive, and put a final bullet into his brain, and then, after threatening the lives of those who were present, compelled some of them to dress the corpse and help load him onto a horse and conceal him in a deep ravine near the Arkansas river, where he was afterwards buried.
After a full and careful consideration of all the points urged by counsel for the appellant and assigned as reasons for a reversal of this judgment, we conclude that none of the errors complained of were of such a fundamental nature or so prejudicial as to deprive the accused of that fair and impartial trial which is guaranteed to him under the Constitution and laws of this state.
The judgment is therefore affirmed.
DOYLE, P.J., and ARMSTRONG, J., concur.

Note:

Virgil (Rex) Ray is Virgil Acuff. Raised by my grandparents Asa and Mattie Ray.
Raymond Ray
Hisaw Bottoms is near Stigler, OK
Just south and east where Dirty Creek flows into the AR river.



SubjectAuthorDate Posted
Clingerclinge... 1021431450000 
debbie ray 1085590902000 
Mia Perez Arr... 1090632280000 
RAYD7024 1401646549000 
Raymond Ray 1472494109000 
b r 1568120577000 
Crystal Moss 1377287253000 
Clingerclinge... 1377295720000 
Raymond Ray 1457490718000 
Clingerclinge... 1457502575000 
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