World Archives Project: New South Wales, Australia, Police Gazettes, 1854-1930 Supplimental Help

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Keying the Police Gazettes Updated 5 October 2011

WHEN IN DOUBT ASK THE MESSAGE BOARD

http://boards.ancestry.com/wap.intlrecordsaustralia/mb.ashx

Contents

FORM TYPE

Gazette Page is the form type usually used for an image. An image consists of one or two pages called sections. If there are two pages, then there are two sections to an image. Create a new section for the second page.

Keying rules state "Unless specifically stated otherwise in the project instructions, information should not be pulled from one image to key on another”. Since the two pages (or sections) here are one image, you can pull information from one page to another if there is a continuation from the end of page 1 to the beginning of page 2.

  1. Index pages just have columns of names and page numbers. They are not keyed. These are titled "Index" at the top of the page.
  2. Do not try to change form types in an image. You cannot use Gazette Page for section 1, and then change to Index or Image with no Data for Section 2 or your entire image will be automatically submitted (with no warning) and you will lose everything you may have already keyed.
  3. Government Supplement: If you get a page entitled Government Supplement, it is considered a Gazette page. Some sections of the Government supplements have no date, and they may not say Government Supplement at the top. There is just a page number - key that number. This is usually a list of hotels. their locations, and the names of the people who hold the licenses. Key all names and locations with Other as the event.
  4. When a NSW Gazette page has no names to key, it is still a Gazette Page, not a Cover page. Just key the header and blank the highlighted section.

HEADER

The header is the name of the Publication e.g., New South Wales Police Gazette. Key only the publication date and page number found at the top of the page Do not key dates at the bottom of the page. If there is no publication date at the top of the page then don’t key anything. On some pages there is just a page number - key that number.

NAVIGATION

The Navigation field is keyed only for the first and the last record of each section/page on the image.

RECORDS

A record is a row of keying information pertaining to one name. There are only four required fields in a record. These are the highlighted (or shaded) fields. All other fields are optional. The highlighted fields are the only places you would ever key a blank (Ctrl B). Never use blanks in optional fields.

  1. Never key in all caps or all lower case.
  2. Columns can be changed to any order you prefer. If you have a long list with last name first, you can switch/drag the given and surname columns to make them easier to key. Don’t forget to switch back if you have further names or you will put first and last names in the wrong columns.

EVENT LOCATION

An article/event can be one sentence or several paragraphs, but only one location is keyed per article/event. That location is where the crime/event (theft, murder, desertion, inquest, etc.) took place.

  1. Key the same location for every name in the article.
  2. When an article/event begins with a place name and a dash, it’s usually where the crime took place. However sometimes it isn't necessarily the name of a city or town. Some of these, which are proper locations in Sydney are; Domain, Hyde Park and Circular Quay. Ask the message board if you are unsure.
  3. Use the drop down list. If you can find it there, it's usually a location. If it's not there, Google it. If you still can’t find it, don’t be afraid to ask the Message Board. Someone there will let you know if it is now, or was at one time, a location.
  4. Use the name place/dash location when there is not a more specific location in the body of the article.
  5. Be aware that some of the names in the drop down list are less than accurate. Do not use: “New South Wales Locations” or “New South Wales Artillery”, just use New South Wales.
  6. When the publication is the New South Wales Police Gazette, if there is no other location in an article, the location is New South Wales.
  7. Spelling – Key as seen. Even if you know the correct spelling is Geelong and in the Gazette it’s spelled Geloong, use the Gazette spelling. If the location in the Gazette shows Miller's Point and the dropdown list shows Millers Point, key as seen and use the apostrophe.
  8. If you are keying the NSW gazette and there is a section entitled “Excerpts from a different (Queensland or Victoria for example) Gazette” use the name of that Gazette as the location unless there is a more specific location in the body of the article.
  9. Return/Release of Prisoners (Tried or Discharged): use the publication location whether in a table (a table is a boxed in column of names or other information) or an article.
  10. If an event (other than Return of Discharge of Prisoners) is in a table, and there is no specific location given, then use the location at the top of the column if there is one, or the publication header if there is no other location.
  11. Missing Persons: where in Australia they were last seen or heard from. If from another country, use the publication location.
  12. In the NSW Gazettes, key "New South Wales" for all overseas locations outside Australia, e.g. New Zealand or England.
  13. If an event is not in a table, and there is no specific location mentioned, then use the district location at the top of the column if there is one, or the publication information if the district is not given.
  14. If there is no header to a page (just a page number) and no district location for the article, use blank (Ctrl B) for the location unless you can tell from the content that it is a New South Wales Gazette image.
  15. The only other time a blank is entered for the Event Location is when starting a fresh image and only part of the paragraph is visible, and then only if the paragraph has names listed.
  16. Inquests: Location is wherever the inquest took place.
  17. If a person is charged with “neglecting to proceed to” (whatever area) the location is that area they neglected to proceed to. This term is usually used in a Ticket of Leave situation.
  18. Ticket of Leave location: wherever granted or issued.
  19. Impounding: Wherever the impound station is located, not where the cattle were impounded from.
  20. Warrant, Bench Warrant or Summons:
    1. If an article states "A bench warrant or summons was issued for John Jones, and there is no location listed, then the location would be the publication header, usually New South Wales.
    2. If an article states "A bench warrant or summons was issued for John Jones by the Sydney Bench, and there is no further information about the area in which the event occurred, then the event location would be Sydney.
    3. If the article states "A bench warrant or summons was issued for John Jones by the Sydney Bench for the crime of murdering Sam Williams at Waverley." The location is Waverly.
  21. If a location is listed as:
    1. Myrtle Creek near Maitland, key Myrtle Creek
    2. Good Hope Gold Fields, key Good Hope
    3. Johnston Station (district header Wagga Wagga), key as Johnston Station
    4. Gully Creek, Bathurst, key Gully Creek
    5. Between Myrtle Creek and Geelong, key first place (Myrtle Creek)
  22. Not a location:
    1. Where a criminal was apprehended is not necessarily the location. The location is where the crime or event occurred, so (if no other more specific location is given) use the publication header – New South Wales or Victoria if given or blank if there is no header.
    2. Where a criminal was tried or remanded to is not necessarily a location. The location is where the crime or event occurred, so (if no other more specific location is given) use the publication header – New South Wales or Victoria if given or blank if there is no header.
    3. If an article says something was stolen from, e.g., John Jones, Liverpool. It doesn’t always mean it was stolen in Liverpool. That’s just the area the person is from. He could have been in another location when the event occurred. Unless it specifically states that the event happened there, don’t use it as a location.
    4. Vide is not a location. It means, “see also” in Latin. It’s directing you to a year and a page.
    5. Ultimo is not a location when in lower case. It means “previous month” in Latin. However, it is a location (a suburb of Sydney) when used as such if capitalized.
    6. Water is not a location when the Water Police are mentioned in an article. They are a branch of the New South Wales police department that operated out of The Rocks - one of the original parts of Sydney. They were not from a place called Water, so (if no other more specific location is given) use the publication header if given or blank if there is no header.
    7. Hotels, streets, roads, house & ship names (usually in quotes, but not always) are not locations.

PREFIX

  1. Do not shorten titles when using prefixes. Key as seen. Sergeant First Class is not Sgt 1st class. Also do not lengthen titles. Cap is not Captain. Include the dash, as in Senior-constable. If Sergeant is spelled as Serjeant, key as seen.
  2. Probationary Constable, Supernumerary and Ordinary Constable are all prefixes. Tracker is also a prefix.
  3. Mr, Mrs, Miss are all prefixes.
  4. The following would be keyed as prefixes even though the description follows the name. These examples are taken from a list of stragglers from a ship:
    1. John Williams, Quarter Master
    2. Richard Brice, O S
    3. John Chapman, A B
    4. James Merrell, Private
  5. Generic job descriptions such as butcher, baker, saloonkeeper, rancher, captain-foretop, farmer, engineer, etc., are not considered as prefixes or suffixes.
  6. Police appointment promotions or reductions: New rank is used as the prefix unless there is no new rank shown in which case the former/existing rank would be keyed.
  7. Different prefixes on the same page - such as Constable Abernathy and, further down, Senior-Constable Abernathy - are to be treated as two separate entries with different prefixes as they are different versions of the name.

NAME

  1. Key the name of every person mentioned in the article EXCEPT makers of products. Do include names engraved on jewelry stolen checks or mail. The only exceptions to this are names appearing in caps at the ends of articles, e.g. HENRY PARKES, and the name of the printer.
  2. Key as seen. Don’t shorten or lengthen names. Do not change Fredk to Frederick or Wm to William. One exception to keying as seen is initials. Even though the article may show “T. G. Smith”, we don’t use the full stop (or period) after the initials. It would be keyed as “T(space)G” in the Given Name area. It is the same with titles such as Mr, Mrs, or Esq.
  3. Spelling – Key as seen. Even if you know the correct spelling is Smith and in the Gazette it’s spelled Smthi, use the Gazette spelling.
  4. Names of hotels, wharves, or companies are keyed if it is a person’s name; e.g., Johnson’s Hotel, Smith’s Wharf, or Paine and Sellers Co., Inc. Paine and Sellers are keyed on two separate records.
  5. If a name is repeated on a page you would generally the name key only once.
    1. However, if the name is spelled differently, key all versions of it, e.g., T. McClaren, Thos, McClaren, Thomas McClaren.
    2. It is not necessary to re-enter the name when the surname appears alone after the full name, e.g. if Thomas McClaren is followed by McClaren alone or by Mr McClaren. For an exception to this rule, see PREFIX #7.
  6. Don’t forget to use the international characters when keying names if they are used in the article, e.g., Baumé.
  7. If given names are connected with “and” you can assume the surnames are the same. For example: The difference between an article stating that “John and Mary Smith are missing (assume they both have the same surname) vs. John Smith and his wife Mary are missing. (Mary would have a blank surname).
  8. If an article states that a name was spelled incorrectly in a previous or vide article e.g., John Berry (not Bury) key both given and surnames on separate records.
  9. If an article gives a name as William OR George Coulter, key both names on separate records. If there is an alias, key it after the second name on the record.
  10. If an article states that a person is identical with, or is believed, thought or supposed to be identical with, a person of another name, key both names with any listed aliases. Each supposed name and its alias should be entered on a separate record.
  11. If a name is in Section 1 and repeated in Section 2, key it in both sections.
  12. Messrs Jones and Smith are keyed as Mr Jones and Mr Smith on separate records.
  13. If a name is in quotes or italics, it sometimes designates a ship, especially if it follows “per”. However, product maker’s names are also sometimes seen in quotes.
  14. Names that look like M’Manus or M’Carthy should be keyed as McManus and McCarthy as it is not an apostrophe but a subscript “c”.
  15. Asian Names - Key as seen with the last name in the surname column. E.g., Tommy Ah Ping. Tommy Ah in given name column and Ping in surname column.
  16. If an article states John Smith was appointed Poundkeeper, or any other job vice Martin Williams (resigned or deceased). Vice, in this case means, “formerly held by”. Both names should be keyed on separate records.
  17. If there is only one name (Chinese or Aboriginal in some cases) key in Given Name field unless it is obviously a surname.
  18. When you encounter longer names that are listed as, or appear to be, aboriginal names or nicknames, the entire name should be keyed in the Given Name field. These examples all belong in the Given Name area:
    1. Young Man Tommy
    2. Kyneton Bobby
    3. Big Sonny
    4. Old Moses.
  19. Photo Pages: Key the names and event types in rows (not columns), left to right.
  20. Do not key:
    1. Makers or manufacturers of products such as Smith and Wesson, etc.
    2. An article or event that does not contain any names.
    3. Regina or Rex, when it appears as Regina or Rex vs. Smith. In this case Regina/Rex is not a name, it means the State or Government.
    4. Names in the Tables of stolen, found, or recovered livestock (horses or cattle). If the page contains only that table, key the header information and nothing else. However, if names appear in an article about stolen livestock, they should be keyed.
    5. Names of ships are not keyed, even if they are named after a person.
    6. Initials if no given or surname is shown.

SUFFIX

  1. Esq
  2. Esq, J P (include comma)
  3. Jr, Jnr, Jun, Junior
  4. Sr, Snr, Sen, Senior
  5. II
  6. III
  7. See dropdown list

AGE

  1. Don’t calculate age from birth dates – leave age space blank.
  2. If the age is written as 27 or 28, or between 25 and 30, key the first age.
  3. If an age is given only in months, e.g., 3 months, key as 3/12.
  4. If age is given as a category, e.g. girl under 14 years, do not enter an age.

EVENT TYPE

  1. There is only one event type for each article, so key the same event type for every name in the article.
  2. The only time a blank is entered for the Event Type is when starting a fresh image and only part of the paragraph is visible, and then only if the paragraph has names listed.
  3. If there is more than one charge against a person, e.g., if someone is assaulted and robbed, use the first crime listed in the article. In this case assault is the event type.
  4. Manslaughter (causing a death in any way) is keyed as Murder.
  5. Attempted murder, rape, garroting, stabbing, felonious wounding, attempting to injure is Assault.
  6. Attempted or actual Larceny, robbery, burglary are all keyed as Theft.
    1. Note the title on the tables of Stolen Jewelry. Until 1901, the title was limited to "stolen" jewelry and watches and keyed as Theft.
    2. Ater 1901 the title changes to "stolen, missing, etc". This means the event type would be Other.
  7. Leaving (absconding or absenting) a contracted job, a ship, or a family is Desertion.
  8. Anything having to do with the internal workings of the police including issuing licenses or appointments. resignations, promotions is Police Business.
  9. Missing Persons: Usually the column has Missing Friends as a title. If Missing Friends is the header for a group of articles, use it for the event type even if it looks like it could be Desertion unless a warrant has been issued for desertion.
  10. A blank is entered for the Event Type when starting a fresh image and only part of the paragraph is visible, and then only if the paragraph has names listed
  11. Photo Pages: Key the names and event types in rows (not columns), left to right.
  12. Events Keyed as Other:
    1. Unlawful carnal knowledge, unless it specifically states rape or injury, in which case it would be Assault.
    2. Obtaining money or goods under false pretences. Includes fraud, embezzlement, forgery, and passing or “uttering” bad checks.
    3. Vandalism
    4. Bigamy
    5. Disobeying a magisterial order, a summons, or absconding from bail even if a description of the original crime follows. The first crime listed here is disobeying an order, a summons, or absconding from bail.
    6. Return of Prisoners Tried or Discharged if no crime is listed.
    7. Release from prison, if no crime is listed.
    8. Apprehension of a criminal if no crime is listed.
    9. A warrant, bench warrant, or summons is issued, but no crime is listed.
    10. Extortion
    11. Attempting to commit or actually committing suicide
    12. Trespassing
    13. Cruelty to animals. This includes killing, maiming or harming an animal in any way.
    14. Inquests
    15. If written as “theft or straying” or “lost or stolen”. Some articles are written as theft and then at the bottom where a reward is offered, it says, “If strayed” the reward is less. Obviously they are unsure so this should be Other.
    16. Impounding animals.
    17. Breaking out of gaol or escaping from custody
    18. Stragglers from ships
    19. Ticket of leave event
    20. Leaving a “Ticket of leave” district
    21. Breaking and entering or burglariously breaking and entering
    22. Arson
    23. Kidnapping or abduction of a person
    24. Possessing or receiving stolen property
    25. Evading payment or refusing to pay for services rendered to a restaurant, hotel, taxi, etc. This is considered fraud.
    26. Issuing licenses, such as publican or captain (unless they are issued by the Police Departments, in which case they would be Police Business).
    27. Causing harm to another person by accident.
    28. Illegally using something that belongs to another person.

ALIAS

An alias can be indicated by words such as "alias", "also known as", "AKA", "better known as" or "may go by the name of" being used within the article. These indicate that there is one person who was known by more than one name.

  1. Wording such as "is identical with" or "thought to be the same as", etc., a person of another name, should be typed as a separate record as this indicates there may have been more than one person, rather than the same person with multiple names.
  2. In the case of more than one alias, list only one, the first given.
  3. If name is e.g., John Brown, alias John Jones, just key Jones in the alias surnames. If it is John Brown, alias, Jimmy Brown, just key Jimmy in the alias given name.
  4. If name were e.g., Thomas Fitzgerald, alias Little Tommy, Little Tommy would be keyed in the alias given name area.
  5. If an article infers that a name was spelled incorrectly in a previous or vide article e.g., John Berry (not Bury) key both given and surnames on separate records - this is not an alias.
  6. If an article gives a name as William OR George Coulter, key both names on separate records. If there is an alias, key it after the second name on the record.

SEE ALSO YEAR, SEE ALSO PAGE

  1. In some vide (Vide is Latin for “see also”.) articles, only a year is listed, and in some only a page is listed. Key them anyway.
  2. In some vide articles there are several different years and/or several different pages listed. Key only one year (the first given), and key only one page (the first given).
  3. Add the same vide "see also" year and page information to each record in an article.
  4. If a vide is included within an article, the year and page need only be keyed for the individual referenced, e.g. "Offender is thought to be identical with escaped prisoner John Smith (vide 1864, page 369)." If there are multiple vides after this name, use only the first.
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