Identifying and Obtaining Instructional Materials

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This article originally appeared in Printed Sources: A Guide to Published Genealogical Records, edited by Kory L. Meyerink.


Identifying and locating instructional materials is not always easy. Evaluating these materials is even more difficult, especially for newcomers to the field. Which guide was written for a quick sell and which will withstand the test of time, aging as gracefully as a well-researched and properly prepared family history? Annotated bibliographies can help researchers assess the value of instructional works.

Identifying and Obtaining Instructional Materials

Annotated bibliographies for genealogy are in short supply. Of these, a handful of contemporary works can help identify instructional materials. One modestly sized, slightly outdated, but authoritative and annotated work is Genealogy: A Selected Bibliography by Milton Rubincam, editor emeritus of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly.

A more comprehensive listing appears in American and British Genealogy and Heraldry, by P. William Filby, in the section titled United States, General Reference, Records, Guides, Indexes. This section contains annotated titles of works known through its date of publication (1983).

Marian Hoffman has compiled and edited Genealogical and Local History Books in Print: General References and World Resources Volume. This volume is perhaps the most current source of instructional materials because new editions or supplements are to be issued on a regular basis. Many titles are submitted by authors or publishers; editors’ comments, if any, should be noted. Two important features of this work are its complete list of vendors and special ordering information. There is an index of authors, titles, and advertisers.

Book reviews and advertisements in genealogical journals and magazines provide an excellent means of learning about new instructional publications. Most publishers advertise in Everton’s Genealogical Helper (published by The Everton Publishers, Logan, Utah) and submit their books for review to several journals. Some journals critique each book; others merely describe the content of each book without evaluating its substance.

People can obtain how-to books easily through publishers or bookstores that specialize in genealogical publications and supplies. In addition, national, state, and local conferences have created opportunities for book vendors to display their merchandise, making customer examination and purchase very convenient.


Printed Sources: A Guide to Published Genealogical Records


Publication Information:

Introduction - By Kory L. Meyerink

Origin of InformationCategories of Research Sources and ToolsEvaluation of Printed SourcesDocumentation and CopyrightLearning What Printed Sources ExistPublishers and DistributorsRepositories of Printed SourcesEffective Use of Libraries and Archives

Chapter 1: General Reference - Martha L. Henderson

Unique Resources in Public LibrariesDewey Decimal Classification SystemReference SourcesEncyclopediasGeneral History SourcesSocial History SourcesAlmanacs, Chronologies, and Statistical SourcesUsing DirectoriesLocal DirectoriesPrinted Professional DirectoriesInstitutional DirectoriesDirectories of Groups and AssociationsSource GuidesGeneral Language DictionariesHistorical and Etymological DictionariesSlang DictionariesSubject DictionariesSurname DictionariesGovernment DocumentsUsing BibliographiesElectronic SourcesReferences for Printed Sources: Chapter 1

Chapter 2: Instructional Materials - Sandra Hargreaves Luebking

Introduction to Instructional MattersHow-To Guides and Manuals for AdultsHow-to Guides and Manuals for Young PeopleGenealogy Technologies and Refinement of SkillsCourses and Programs of StudyPeriodical ArticlesIdentifying and Obtaining Instructional MaterialsEvaluating Instructional MaterialsSelecting Textbooks for Classroom UseThe Future of Instructional MaterialsReferences for Printed Sources: Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Introduction to Geographic ToolsIntroduction to Maps and GazettersMapping of a New NationRoutes to the WestCanals and WaterwaysRailroadsPolitical MapsNineteenth-Century MapsUSGS Topographic MapsOrdering Topographic Map Names and NumbersOrdering Topographic MapsDigital Topographic MapsOut-of-Print Topographic MapsFact Sheets and General Interest PublicationsOther Types of USGS MapsNineteenth-Century National GazetteersTwentieth-Century National GazetteersPostal Guides and Shipping GuidesMaps, Gazetteers, and the ComputerFinding Geographic ToolsUsing Geographic ToolsReferences for Printed Sources: Chapter 3

Chapter 4

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Chapter 5

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Chapter 6

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Chapter 7

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Chapter 8

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Chapter 9

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Chapter 10

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Chapter 11

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Chapter 12

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Chapter 13

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Chapter 14

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Chapter 15

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Chapter 16

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Chapter 17

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Chapter 18

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Chapter 19

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Chapter 20

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Appendix

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