Census Records for Georgia

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This entry was originally written by the Johni Cerny and Robert S. Davis, in Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources.

This article is part of
the Georgia Family History Research series.
History of Georgia
Georgia Vital Records
Census Records for Georgia
Background Sources for Georgia
Georgia Maps
Georgia Land Records
Georgia Probate Records
Georgia Court Records
Georgia Tax Records
Georgia Cemetery Records
Georgia Church Records
Georgia Military Records
Georgia Periodicals, Newspapers, and Manuscript Collections
Georgia Archives, Libraries, and Societies
Georgia Immigration
Ethnic Groups of Georgia
Georgia County Resources
Map of Georgia


Contents

Federal

Population Schedules

• Indexed—1820 (partial), 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 1890 (fragment), 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930

• Soundex—1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930

Industry and Agriculture Schedules

• Industry—1820, 1880

• Agriculture—1850, 1860, 1870, 1880

Mortality Schedules

• 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880

Slave Schedules

• 1850, 1860

Unfortunately, the 1820 census is the earliest enumeration of Georgia’s population to have survived, making it necessary to substitute other lists for the missing censuses. More than forty percent of Georgia’s population (and likely seventy percent of the frontier migration families) lived in Wilkes County in 1790, making the numerous publications of that one county’s extensive surviving records an especially valuable census substitute. The 1820 census of Georgia is also lost for Franklin, Rabun, and Twiggs counties; for many other counties, names were often omitted or unreadable. Land lottery, military, tax lists, and other records, discussed under other headings, are available as census substitutes and supplements for the 1820 and earlier censuses. Both the Georgia Archives and the FHL have a complete set of Georgia census records and mortality schedules.

State

Georgia conducted state censuses for various years from 1787 to 1866. Only a relatively few of these returns survive, and they are only lists of heads of households with some minor statistical information. The returns prior to 1852 have been published in various sources. Later census returns, when they survive, are almost all on microfilm at the Georgia Archives. To see what has survived of Georgia state and federal census records, see Robert S. Davis, Research in Georgia (see [Georgia Background Sources]), 27-41, 44, 147-68.

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