Welcome to a yearlong celebration of our story—and yours. We invite you to explore highlights from our first 15 years and get to know some of the fascinating customers and employees that have joined us along the way.

We’re also celebrating 15 years of the people behind our success.

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 1996

    *Lou has worked with the company since 1992 prior
    to the online launch.

    Department: Community Relations

    Lou Szucs

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. The people are awesome! All the people I work with are dedicated to making family history a positive and transforming experience for everyone!

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. I feel that I am helping bridge Ancestry.com with long-time friends; particularly those in the archival community, library community, and the leaders of the family history community. In this capacity, I’ve been able to work with the content team to bring in some great historical records.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. Looking back on my nineteen years with Ancestry it is pretty hard to say. I guess it has been the ability to adjust and find good in the many, many changes to the company during this time. Other than that, it has been the ability to work with leaders in the field. (Many of whom became friends while we were writing and editing the first, second and third editions of The Source: A Guidebook to American Genealogy.)

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. I was hired to be the acquisitions editor – again providing me the great opportunity to work with a diverse crowd of authors who specialize in family history. In 1992, Ancestry was just a small publishing company with 12 employees and approximately the same number of published books by that time.

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 1997

    Department: Content Acquisition

    Quinton Atkinson

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. The only other “real” job I’ve had was as a surf judge for the South African Surfing Association. With that in mind, a primary difference is that I no longer conduct business on the beach.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. Two aspects of my role bring me great satisfaction. One is the ability to help archives and other repositories with the preservation and access of their valuable records. The second is the knowledge that the records and documents that I am helping to bring online will result in amazing and impactful discoveries for our users.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. In terms of acquiring the rights and permissions to publish records on the Ancestry.com website, my work with The National Archives of England and Wales stands out for me. It took about four years from first contact through contract signature to obtain the permission needed to begin publishing the documents of the UK Census. In terms of record importance and significance, the recent partnership between with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com is one that has great meaning and significance for millions of people around the world, and thus has had great impact and importance for me.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. My first job involved answering the phones and helping people pay for and unlock databases on their Ancestry CDs.

  • MEMBER SINCE 1998

    Location: Washington

    Ralene Guy

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. I think there comes a time when most individuals want to reach back and find out where they came from. My dad always told us that he was born under a rock. When I got older and realized that I had not met another Jordan besides my immediate family, and reflected on what Daddy had told us at different times, he knew more about his relatives than he let on. Life then went too fast with school, marriage, children and work. Suddenly middle age was here and I wanted to find out about the Jordans. Sister Pat and I took a trip to Salt Lake City, Utah and started our odyssey with genealogy.

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Ancestry.com has helped me go back to the Pilgrims in 1620 when one Edward Fuller, his wife and his son were on the Mayflower, to 1641 when Olof Stille from Sweden sailed on the Charitas to New Sweden and 1743 when Patrick Jordan from Ireland arrived in the New World and started his family in Virginia and Kentucky. Then Jacob and Mary Ann Jordan raised nine sons and two daughters in PA and Ohio. I must also include Mom's side, the Jones' which were part Cherokee Indian from Tennessee. Because of Ancestry.com, I found others that have researched where their Indian blood came from. Thanks to three sisters, I was able to find the Wilkerson/Wilkinson, Standridge, Blevins, Browns, Hamptons and others that had been lost to memory of our elders.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. My favorite part of the site is being able to find and view censuses, marriage records, and pictures. I also enjoy meeting other members researching some of the same people. I have actually been in contact with ten or more of these individuals and shared genealogy with them.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. My dad has an uncle, Chance Reeves. I found him with his wife and two children living in Huntington, Oregon in 1820 but after that nothing. His wife was Carlee or Carlae. His WWI draft card stated he had a wife Carlee and a child. I did try to find a Carlee in earlier census records. I tried to find a marriage certificate but no luck except a Carlee in KS in 1900. The last name was not familiar. After several years of research, out of the blue I received a message from another Ancestry member asking if I knew a Chance Everett Reeves. By contacting her immediately, I was able to find Chance's wife and children and his story. Please don't think that this was my only exciting moment. Each individual who contacted me, or I them, was exciting. Just being able to be in touch with a cousin and learning something about their side of the family is exciting. I was also able to find a niece, Barbara.

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I have several wishes: To find what happen to Theodocia Campbell, granddaughter of Mary Patterson Reeves. Where did Franklin Reeves die? Where did my grandmother Hattie M Reeves Jordan die? That's just on the Jordan side.grandmother Hattie M Reeves Jordan die? That's just on the Jordan side.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 1999

    Department: Human Resources

    Jeff Weber

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. Two things:

    1. The talented people who care about and are passionate about our products
    2. The meaningful service we provide for our customers.

    It is unique to work for a company where employees and customers are both so passionate and emotionally engaged in the product.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. To be involved with the growth and recognition of the company as we have expanded. Also, seeing interest in the category grow as Ancestry.com makes it easier and easier to connect people with their family history stories. The increased brand recognition and positive perceptions are also making it easier to recruit people to the company.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. I think this really goes back to helping build a team of talented, passionate and capable people at this company—not just those who are here today, but all of those who have contributed to the business over the years to help get us to where we are today. Ancestry.com has a great legacy of employees and is continuing to expand that legacy in new locations and offices with people who have different backgrounds and experiences.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. HR Director—we had approximately 150 employees at the time. It’s been rewarding to experience the growth of the company as we have now reached more than 1,000 employees.

  • MEMBER SINCE 2000

    Location: Michigan

    Sally Harris

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. My 5th grade daughter had an assignment to do a family tree, and I realized how little we knew about our ancestors. The search started as I actively began to seek out family information, which led to more in-depth research. The last years have been filled with amazement and wonder as I discovered our family roots. Thank you, Ancestry.com!

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Ancestry.com has always been the base tool for my research and has helped me locate historical family information to “connect the dots” and create family projects. Most importantly, it has connected me with cousins and family whom I never knew—across the continents of North America, Europe, Australia, and the British Isles.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. The organization and format are excellent, which allows me to explore and enjoy all of Ancestry.com, especially the access to a wide range of historical documents. I especially like the additions of new sources to explore on a regular basis, but I believe my favorite part is learning what others have found in their family trees and making connections with them.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. Tough question as so many experiences have been exciting. Finding a Native/African American connection, original pre-Civil War letters written by my 3rd great-grandmother, pictures of one grandmother who was the first white woman born in Indian Territory, finding my father’s family (he was adopted), walking on the Native American land of my 3rd great-grandparents, and so much more.

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I am hoping to locate more family; especially in Wales, Greece, and Germany. When seeking your ancestors, once the first step is taken the journey never ends. Names and locations are just a teaser; there is a desire to learn more about their lives, their struggles, and their dreams. Therefore, I will continue to seek and expand my family tree, learn more about my heritage, and learn more about who I am.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2001

    Department: Content Management

    Echo King

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. After a decade with Ancestry.com, I barely remember any other jobs. I know it is a lot cleaner than when I worked on my dad’s farm.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. I really enjoy meeting members who tell me their success stories. I love to see those family connections spring up while you are watching. I try to remember that every collection that we add will help someone with a potential breakthrough.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. I couldn’t pick just one thing and say that it was the greatest. Working with and publishing the U.S. Census collections was tremendous, but we publish great content all of the time. When I think about what has changed in the last ten years, I’m very impressed with how much we accomplished back then, but also with how we have grown with each new challenge. We are doing so much more today.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. I was hired as the Project Manager for the U.S. Census projects. At the time I did everything from shipping and receiving film to editing indexes. I loved it because I got to learn every piece of the process.

  • MEMBER SINCE 2002

    Location: Denver, Colorado

    Johari Lewis-Green

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. My interest in researching my family history began around 1977 after watching Roots. Like many other African Americans, I became curious about slavery and wanted to know if any of my ancestors had been enslaved. I dabbled in genealogy for years. I began to research in earnest years later when my father (who was born in 1921), told me that his father (my grandfather) had disappeared when my father was about eight years old, and had never been heard from again. I promised my father that I would find out what happened to my grandpa. I took the promise very seriously, and I did find out what happened to my grandfather. I found that he had been part of the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments, and his body had been kept from the family by being buried in a pauper's grave.

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Ancestry.com has helped me in so many ways. The census schedules helped me get back to about 1870, and the slave schedules helped me put more of the pieces together. The death indexes helped me find original death certificates, probate records, and much more. I also found a lot of helpful information in the newspaper collection. In fact, I found a copy of a story about my 3rd great grandmother. To my delight, there was a photograph on the front page. I also used Ancestry.com's collection of black slave narratives to get firsthand accounts from some of my ancestors who were held in slavery. By using the Black Slave Narratives, not only was I able to obtain the names and dates of my ancestors, I was also able to bring their stories to life by using their own words. What started out as a simple chart turned into a 244-page historical narrative of my family's history. (I wrote a book, called Ten Generations of Bondage: Eleven Generations of Faith.)

    I think that one of the most important ways Ancestry.com has helped me connect to the past is with the "Member Connect" feature. I have been truly amazed that I managed to connect with so many other relatives who are also researching the family history. I have met several of them who still live in my father's small hometown in Arkansas, and we have kept in touch.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. My favorite part of the site is "Member Connect." This section provides notices of people who are also researching the same ancestors that I am. I like the option of being able to compare their family trees and documents to my family tree and documents. I also love the fact that I am able to send the person a message and compare research. I have connected with many relatives through this option and have made many lifelong family connections.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. My most exciting discovery this far is that I was finally able to find AND VISIT the Mississippi plantation that my ancestors were enslaved on. Another Ancestry.com member contacted me through the site and told me that she lived on the property and invited me to visit. I was able to visit the old graves that were on the property. It was a surreal experience to actually walk on that land, but I felt that I had accomplished something that I had only dreamed about.

    It was also very fulfilling to keep the promise to my father and let him know where Grandpa was buried.

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I still hope to find my connection to my ancestors in Africa. I know that new records become available daily, and I am keenly aware that even after all the years that I have been a member of Ancestry.com, I still regularly find more information.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2003

    Department: Business Continuity and Security

    Jennifer Munson

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. I know that I have a unique role in the ongoing success of my co-workers and customers. That sense of personal accountability is fostered throughout the company and goes a long way to help promote a dynamic, positive working environment.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. That I am able to help protect the company through my efforts with our business continuity program.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. While I have had many wonderful experiences managing our global payment and business continuity programs, one experience that really stands out is when I was still a newer employee working in member services. An elderly gentleman from South Florida called in one afternoon to cancel his subscription. He’d signed up a few days prior, hoping that he could find a way to reconnect with his family. As I took care of his account, we talked and he told me that years before, after hearing about the attack of Pearl Harbor on his family’s radio, he’d run away from home and joined the Merchant Marines. He was only 17. After serving in the South Pacific, he returned to his home in New Jersey to find that his family had moved away without leaving a forwarding address.

    Years passed and he never stopped wondering what had happened to his family, especially his younger sisters. I could tell that he was sad and very disappointed, and so I asked him as many questions as I could about what he remembered and then promised to call him back if I was able to find any promising leads. Eventually, with the help of one of Ancestry.com’s genealogists and lots of searching through various New Jersey neighborhoods in the 1930 Federal Census, we were able to help our customer finally reunite with his youngest sister, who ironically enough had also moved to Florida. He called me and my co-worker back after the reunion and we alternated between laughing and crying as he described hugging his sister for the first time in nearly sixty years and meeting her children and grandchildren. His joy and relief at no longer being alone was palpable and reminds me to this day why family is SO important.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. Customer Service Representative for the Inbound Member Services Team.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2004

    Department: Member Services

    Mary Nordin

    I have worked at Ancestry.com since April 2004. I've enjoyed teaching and helping people with their family history since I was sixteen years old. I help even more people each day working here. Ancestry.com is the best site to do genealogy, family history, and build family trees.

    I work in member services and the call center for Ancestry.com. Answering questions, setting up memberships, giving site tips, and helping on family trees and Family Tree Maker are just some of the things I do in my job. I also work in the Publish-MyCanvas department, answering questions about family history books and chart projects, as well as the DNA department.

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. I get paid to do what I love—helping ensure that people have the tools and tips they need to find their ancestors. I enjoy the contact with our members. The company's leadership and employees are focused on helping our members be successful, which is also important to me.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. Giving our members help and encouragement in their efforts to find their ancestors is very satisfying. Sharing in their excitement when they find a new ancestor, cousin or record is like finding one of my own ancestors. I’ve also been able to share my talents by helping other departments and testing out new projects.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. My goal has been to help and encourage our employees as well as members in their quest to find ancestors. I feel it is very important for them to know who they are and where they come from, so this help and encouragement has been my greatest accomplishment.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. I have been in member services and the call center since I started working at Ancestry.com. I've stayed in this position because I love working with our members.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2005

    Department: Member Services

    Arnold Ngatuvai

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. Ancestry.com combines a timeless product and a dynamic work environment composed of individuals sparking positive impact within their spheres of influence: personal, companywide, communitywide, worldwide, family-wide. We’re like lightning in a bottle. It’s almost impossible for a company to replicate such a magical combination unless you’ve got a mascot who is a mouse.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. Satisfaction doesn’t describe it. I’m addicted to seeing my team thrive. I especially love hearing from customers about how our services provide a profoundly emotional experience to be cherished for years to come. I love knowing that we’re actively helping people carry the most poignant moments of the past to help them redefine their present identity and re-envision the boundless possibilities of the future. That’s awesome.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. I love getting wonderful people through the door and facilitating their growth into expanded roles so we can build our company from the ground up as an innovative, agile, and customer-centric juggernaut of an organization.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. Customer service representative

  • MEMBER SINCE 2006

    Location: Texas

    Dannie Baker

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. Genealogy has always interested me, and when a cousin shared her genealogy with me I had to try my hand at it. Until we bought a computer we had to go libraries, courthouses, etc. to do research. My husband taught me how to use the computer and when I heard people could do research “online” I couldn't wait to get a subscription to Ancestry.com.

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Ancestry.com's census records proved what my family had always said about us having American Indian heritage. There is nothing more exciting than turning family myths into family history. One ancestor died in the Civil War while another survived by going AWOL. I found other ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War. I've proved my Irish heritage, English heritage, and so much more.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. It’s really difficult to choose my favorite part. If I had to choose it would have to be the many census records, but there are so many other parts I haven't even searched yet. Since I have African-Americans in my lineage too, I really enjoy reading interviews of former slaves.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. Every discovery is exciting, and my son and I spend days discussing each one. One of the most exciting was when I decided to try one last time to find my great-grandfather, John Anderson, on the census and there he was just a few houses from my great-grandmother. He was hidden right in plain sight.

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I still hope to find that elusive great-grandfather’s parents and siblings. He is difficult to research because John Anderson is a very common name! I hope to discover the name of a great-great-grandmother who was only called Widow Wilson in the court records. With all the records Ancestry.com has, I'm sure there are still a lot of nuggets just waiting for me.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2007

    Department: International Legal

    Ruth Daniels

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. I’ve had a few jobs over the years, both as a lawyer and also in fashion and marketing; one great difference is that thankfully I don’t have time sheets to complete! Another key difference is that we really are trailblazers in the space we operate—an exciting place to be.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. Working within a truly international environment and the fact that no one day is ever the same due to the constant dynamism and new challenges we face.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. Being able to influence and contribute to change and growth, by working with so many great people across all areas of the business, in different countries, is very rewarding. I have learnt to juggle many things; completing the acquisition of Genline last year, in particular, means a lot to me since we are now seeing an enthusiastic and fantastic team integrated and contributing to the business.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. Director of Legal (EU & Australia)

  • MEMBER SINCE 2008

    Location: Northwest Montana

    Marie Fong

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. I wanted to make a family tree for my kids.

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Oh my! Because of what I found on Ancestry.com, I was able to find my birth mother, see her picture, read her obituary, and find my siblings. It would not have been possible without the website.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. I really like the public tree feature and the ability to contact the other people who are doing these trees. Without the public tree feature, I would not have been able to see my niece’s family tree, or been able to contact her. It is only through those tools that I found my birth family and found a way to contact them.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. OH MY!! MY BIRTH FAMILY!!!!!

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I hope to work on my birth father’s side of the tree and contacting any of that family I can find.

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2009

    Department: Document Preservation

    Sabrina Petersen

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. I love my job. I am excited to come to work every day. There are always challenges, but I feel like I am making a difference within a community I love.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. Being at the forefront of preserving historical documents and making them available for generations to come.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. Opening the Ancestry.com Washington D.C. office. There were many federal regulations that had to be studied and followed to insure that the office was a safe environment for historical documents–and that was just to get the office approved. A minimum of three different departments from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) had to certify everything from security to the paint on the walls. Then there was a six-month pilot program to make sure that it would all work. Nothing like this had been attempted before and since the six months were a success, we have now expanded the office. We still have many inspections and there are daily guidelines that must be adhered to, but this has in turn helped all of our imaging locations around the world. It has been the benchmark for Ancestry.com regarding the proper handling of records, the reading room like atmosphere that we require our scanners at every location to follow, and the 100% quality assurance that is conducted on a routine basis.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. Business Operations Manager

  • MEMBER SINCE 2010

    Location: Ithaca, NY

    Paul Hubert

    Q. Why did you start researching your family history?

    A. I met my biological father two or three times, when I was five to seven years of age. I started using Ancestry.com to find out who my father's family was. I interviewed my mother and wrote down everything she could remember about where my father lived, who his siblings were, what type of person he was and of course who his parents were. My mother was able to list 14 brothers and sisters that my father had. I remember being both amazed and suspicious about this at the time. My mother was unable to tell me who my paternal grandparents were however, and it was not until 2009 when my father died that I learned who they were through his obituary. Unfortunately I did not know where he lived until his obituary was published. In 2010, when we learned we were having fraternal twins, I became even more interested than I had been prior. I did not like the thought of my kids growing up and not knowing about their paternal grandfather's family. I found my paternal grandparents on the 1930 U.S. Federal Census along with several children with many of the names my mother had mentioned. Everything fell into place from there after much talking with cousins and time spent pulling obituaries. According to several sources, including birth announcements I found in newspapers, obituaries and word of mouth, my father had around 23 brothers and sisters. I have since researched each and every one of my paternal aunts and uncles and found several cousins whom I am now in contact with via email and Facebook.

    Q. How has Ancestry.com helped connect to your past?

    A. Through my research I have come in contact with around 30 or so living cousins, some who already had my mother’s line in their tree. After discovering who my paternal grandparents were, more and more public trees began appearing and I discovered cousins from my father's side as well. I have since proven my lines through birth and death certificates, baptisms, census records and obituaries. The further back I looked, more hints and public trees began appearing. Occasionally, I am contacted through the messaging system at Ancestry.com by distant cousins who are just starting their research. Ancestry.com was the start of my now daily obsession with genealogy. I had my first experience with microfilm just six months ago at the New Jersey State Archives in Trenton, NJ. I spent three days there from the moment they opened until closing. I never thought I would take my family research this far.

    Q. What is your favorite part about the site?

    A. It would be difficult for me to name just one favorite part of Ancestry.com. My family had never kept a family bible or tree until we found Ancestry.com. I like being able to navigate through each family with ease, as opposed to going through a stack of papers. I love being able to change facts with the click of a button after finding new information. I like that all of my data is online rather than on my computer so that it cannot be lost if something were to happen to it. One cousin I found through Ancestry.com told me their ancestor had been researching since 1940 for at least 60 years. He was amazed that I was able to pull so much information together in a matter of hours; information that took his ancestor considerable time to send away for. Apparently family research took weeks, months and years before the internet and Ancestry.com. I like that Ancestry.com has several different databases that I can immediately search at any hour of the day. You do not need to know necessarily what records to look for with Ancestry.com, just start by searching for your parents or grandparents names on the main search form and Ancestry.com will guide you. Ancestry.com is the base for all of my research and I cannot imagine doing it any other way.

    Q. What is your most exciting discovery thus far?

    A. My most exciting discovery would have to be finding distant cousins on Ancestry.com and Facebook and exchanging family information. With Ancestry.com, I discovered that both my maternal and paternal ancestors have lived in the same state since the early 1800s. At this point in my search I am working with the DNA feature as I have hit brick walls on both lines in the early 1800s. I think the most exciting discovery is as simple as finding out the names of your ancestors, who they were, who they married, who their children were, what they did for a living and how they died. My family research with Ancestry.com has really given me a sense of belonging.

    Q. What discoveries do you still hope to find?

    A. I have not yet traced either of my lines out of America. Although we have our suspicions, I would like to connect both lines to the countries they emigrated from, whatever they may be. At this time we do not know when either line immigrated or where they departed from. All we know is that they were all New Jersey farmers, owned acres of land, and were fairly respected by the public. I enjoy finding newspaper articles mentioning them and their affairs.

    READ MORE

  • EMPLOYEE SINCE 2011

    Department: DNA

    Ken Chahine, Ph.D. J.D.

    Q. What makes working at Ancestry.com different from other jobs you’ve had?

    A. I love the people. There is an unparalleled level of collaboration, energy, and eagerness to constantly improve the customer experience that makes it easy to come to work.

    Q. What is most satisfying about your role here?

    A. We are living through the greatest scientific revolution in history. I feel fortunate to be part of a great team that is using those tools to revolutionize genetic genealogy. Our DNA products are not only going to be invaluable genealogy tools, but they are going to be simple, personal, interactive, and downright cool. I think we are all going to be blown away with what we can do with DNA in the not too distant future.

    Q. What has been your greatest accomplishment at the company?

    A. The DNA team has a split personality: one half of the team is performing cutting-edge science, and the other half is translating the science into cutting-edge user experiences. Watching the team seamlessly collaborate is fun to watch.

    Q. What was your first job at the company?

    A. I was a consultant for almost a year exploring the potential of DNA in genealogy.

The views expressed are those of the individuals making the comments and not those of Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.

Click below for highlights from 15 years of Ancestry.com

  • 1996

    1996

    Ancestry.com becomes the first website to feature the Social Security Death Index.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 1997

    1997

    Ancestry.com adds a new database every weekday.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 1998

    1998

    Ancestry.com launches MyFamily.com, giving families a new way to connect through their own private websites.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 1999

    1999

    Ancestry.com adds head-of-household indexes for the U.S. Federal Census.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2000

    2000

    Ancestry.com launches images of U.S. Federal Census records and starts creating an every-name index for the collection.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2001

    2001

    Ancestry.com releases its one-billionth historical record.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2002

    2002

    Within 24 hours of NARA’s release, Ancestry.com launches images from the 1930 U.S. Federal Census and starts indexing names in the collection.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2003

    2003

    Ancestry.com publishes every name in the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, plus images.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2004

    2004

    Ancestry.com releases the 1901 England and Wales Census.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2005

    2005

    Tim Sullivan, former CEO of Match.com, becomes president and CEO of MyFamily.com, Inc., the parent company of Ancestry.com.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2006

    2006

    Ancestry.com launches online family trees.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2007

    2007

    Ancestry.com reaches the milestone of having the largest online collection of U.S. military records with 90 million in the collection.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2008

    2008

    Ancestry.com introduces the World Archives Project.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2009

    2009

    Ancestry.com opens a scanning facility in Washington, D.C. that currently scans nearly 9 million documents a year.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2010

    2010

    Ancestry.com sponsors and provides research for the first season of the U.S. TV series Who Do You Think You Are? on NBC.

    Our home page at the time:
  • 2011

    2011

    Ancestry.com launches the Ancestry app for iPad and iPhone and surpasses one million downloads.

    Our home page now: